2021-2022 Catalog 
    
    Sep 26, 2022  
2021-2022 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MATH 333 - Partial Differential Equations

    (4)
    FA, alternate years. An Introduction to partial differential equations and their applications. Topics Include mathematical modeling with partial differential equations, nondimensionalization, orthogonal expansions, solution methods for linear Initial and boundary-value problems, asymptotic expansions, and numerical solution of partial differential equations. Prerequisites: MATH 231  and MATH 270  or MATH 271 .
  
  •  

    MATH 335 - Numerical Analysis

    (4)
    Offered occasionally. Theory and practice of computational procedures Including principles of error analysis and scientific computation, root-finding, polynomial Interpolation, splines, numerical Integration, applications to ordinary differential equations, computational matrix algebra, orthogonal polynomials, least square approximations, and other applications. Prerequisites: CS 104 , CS 106  or CS 108  and MATH 255 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    MATH 351 - Abstract Algebra

    (4)
    SP. An Introduction to abstract algebraic systems, including groups, rings, and fields, and their applications. Prerequisite: MATH 361 .
  
  •  

    MATH 355 - Advanced Linear Algebra

    (4)
    SP. Vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, inner product spaces, spectral theory, singular values and pseudoinverses, canonical forms, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 255 , or both MATH 231  and MATH 270  or MATH 271 .
  
  •  

    MATH 359 - Seminar in Secondary Teaching of Mathematics

    (3)
    FA. A course in perspectives on, principles of, and practices in the teaching of mathematics on the secondary level. This course must be taken concurrently with EDUC 346. The seminar provides a forum for the discussion of concerns that develop during directed teaching.
  
  •  

    MATH 361 - Real Analysis I

    (4)
    FA. The real number system, sets and cardinality, the topology of the real numbers, numerical sequences and series, real functions, continuity, differentiation, and Riemann Integration. Prerequisites: two mathematics courses numbered 231 or above.
  
  •  

    MATH 362 - Real Analysis II

    (4)
    SP, alternate years. A continuation of MATH 361. Topics from sequences and series of functions, measure theory, and Lebesgue integration. Prerequisite: MATH 361 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    MATH 365 - Complex Variables

    (4)
    SP. Complex numbers, complex functions, integration and the Cauchy integral formula, power series, residues and poles, and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MATH 270  or MATH 271 .
  
  •  

    MATH 380 - Perspectives on Modern Mathematics

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course explores the historical development of some of the basic concepts of modern mathematics. It includes an examination of significant issues and controversies, philosophical perspectives, and problems on which mathematicians have focused throughout history. Prerequisites: MATH 361 , biblical foundations I or theological foundations I, developing a Christian mind and philosophical foundations.
  
  •  

    MATH 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Math department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Math department. 

  
  •  

    MATH 385 - Topics in Mathematics

    (3-4)
    FA, SP, as needed. Advanced study of selected topics in mathematics. Consult instructor for course information. This course may be repeated for credit provided the topic is different. Prerequisite: a Mathematics course numbered 231 or above. Some topics may have additional requirements.
  
  •  

    MATH 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP. Independent study of topics of interest to particular students under supervision of a member of the department staff. Open to qualified students with permission of the department chair.
  
  •  

    MATH 391 - Colloquium

    (0)
    FA, SP. Meets weekly for an hour for the presentation of various topics in Mathematics, computer science, and related disciplines by students, faculty, and visiting speakers. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses in mathematics.
  
  •  

    MATH 395 - Senior Thesis in Mathematics

    (1-4)
    FA, SP. The course requirements include an expository or research paper and an oral presentation on a selected topic in mathematics. Open to qualified students with the permission of the chair.

Ministry Leadership (Handlon Campus)

  
  •  

    ML 101 - Old Testament Survey

    (3)
    This course prepares leaders in the church to be faithful and effective stewards of the Word by acquainting them with the basic content and principal theme of each book of the Old Testament; the historical, geographical, and cultural backgrounds to the Old Testament; its introductory hermeneutical principles; and its continuing relevance. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 102 - New Testament Survey

    (3)
    This course prepares leaders in the church to be faithful and effective stewards of the Word by acquainting them with the basic content and principal theme of each book of the New Testament; the historical, geographical, and cultural backgrounds to the New Testament; its introductory hermeneutical principles; and its continuing relevance. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 111 - Church in Historical Context I

    (3)
    An introduction to the historical context of Christianity from 100-1300 A.D. The emphasis of this history course will be the social, cultural, political, and religious contexts of Christianity and the ways in which the thought, practices, and institutions of Christians were shaped by and responded to various contexts. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 112 - Church in Historical Context II

    (3)
    An introduction to Christianity in its historical context from the late Middle Ages to the present, with special attention to developments in Europe and North America. The course focuses on the global expansion of Christianity during the last 700 years and on the question of how the church’s institutions, thought, and practice were shaped by and responded to their various contexts. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 121 - Christian Formation

    (3)
    The process of spiritual formation is intentionally engaged so that habits developed throughout students’ theological education will form them for ministry. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 122 - Practice of Discipleship

    (3)
    Jesus commands his followers to make disciples. In this course, learners will explore how to assess ministry contexts and how to use Christian practices and various forms of teaching to make 21st -century disciples. The course will include opportunities to practice these skills. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 202 - Old Testament Narrative Literature

    (3)
    This course explores the form and content of Old Testament narrative literature in the books of Genesis through Kings, Chronicles, Ezra-Nehemiah, and Esther. Particular attention will be paid to the literary artistry, theological themes, and canonical shaping/context of each book and select passages from each book with a goal to developing the skills and knowledge required for faithful interpretation and proclamation of Old Testament narrative texts. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101
  
  •  

    ML 203 - Psalms and Wisdom Literature

    (3)
    This course explores the form and content of Psalms and Wisdom literature in the books of Proverbs, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, and Job. Particular attention will be paid to the literary artistry, theological themes, and canonical shaping/context of each book and select passages from each book with a goal to developing the skills and knowledge required for faithful interpretation and proclamation of Old Testament psalms and wisdom literature. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101
  
  •  

    ML 205 - New Testament Narratives

    (3)
    A study of the Gospels and Acts. Students develop an exegetical method through an analysis and critique of the various approaches to the gospels, they sharpen their exegetical skills through the study of specific periscopes, and they learn to teach and proclaim the meaning of New Testament narratives today. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 102
  
  •  

    ML 206 - New Testament Letters

    (3)
    A review of the basic principles of interpreting the biblical text (i.e., hermeneutics) as they apply to the New Testament letters. Special attention is given to the grammar, historical context, social setting, epistolary structure, and theological themes of the New Testament letters as well as their message for the church today. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 102
  
  •  

    ML 207 - New Testament I

    (4)
    An introduction to the basic elements of New Testament Greek, with an emphasis on the mastery of forms, basic vocabulary and syntax. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 211 - Theology of the Holy Spirit

    (3)
    An overview of the ongoing work and ministry of the Holy Spirit in the church for the advancement of God’s Kingdom. Students will explore the work of the Holy Spirit in both the Old and New Testaments, giving special attention to the Spirit’s work of equipping believers for fruitful witness and effective fulfillment of Jesus’ great commission. This practical theology course will look closely at the various means of grace made available to prepare for spiritual battle and equip the church for ministry, with an emphasis on personal preparation for spiritual leadership in prison. Lecture Prerequisites: REL 131, ML 101, and ML 102 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 221 - Foundations for Pastoral Care

    (3)
    This course will aid students in constructing a biblical, theological, and practical framework for understanding and implementing pastoral care. Students will begin to formulate and embrace their own pastoral identity and to create a foundational corpus of skills and competencies that address various modes of pastoral care. The pastoral skills and competencies that are addressed in this course will assist students in developing contextual perspective, understanding the complexities of human experience, and appropriating theological and biblical perspectives, all in the service of providing effective pastoral care within a relational paradigm. Lecture Prerequisites: REL 131, ML 101, ML 102, ML 121, and ML 122 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 222 - Forgiveness and Reconciliation

    (3)
    Forgiveness and reconciliation are key elements in a Christian’s relationships with God and other people. This course addresses not only the relationship between God’s forgiving us and our forgiving others, but also ways in which forgiveness and reconciliation are related to repentance, confession, restitution, and justice. Lecture Prerequisites: REL 131, ML 101, ML 102 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 307 - New Testament Greek II

    (4)
    This course continues the study of the basics of Biblical Greek. The teaching includes an introduction to Greek grammar, vocabulary, and syntax and then introduces the student to the reading of the Greek New Testament. Emphasis is given to the use of Bible software as well as the exegetical application of Greek tenses and moods, adverbial participles, and conditional sentences to exegesis. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 207
  
  •  

    ML 311 - Apologetics

    (3)
    The course is an introduction to Christian apologetics as an aspect of ministry. It first considers the relation of revelation, faith, and rationality. It then responds to major challenges to the existence and nature of God, the place of evil in God’s providence and redemption, God’s supernatural action in nature and history, the credibility of Scripture’s witness to Jesus Christ, and salvation through Christ alone. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102 and REL 131 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 312 - Theologizing Violence

    (3)
    Violence is a problem of profound significance in the world today and it presents a unique challenge to the Christian Church in its mission to proclaim and live the gospel. Through engaging selected readings and films, this theology seminar examines various types of violence (i.e. racialized, military, domestic, etc.) to gain insight into how violence shapes and threatens individuals, communities and the world around us. One primary goal of the course is to better understand the kinds of theological claims that Christians can and should make in response to a world that continues to be plagued by violence. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102, REL 131, and CMS 151 or permission of program director
  
  •  

    ML 321 - Forming Worshiping Communities

    (3)
    An introduction to the principles and practices of vital and faithful worship leadership. The course explores biblical and historical perspectives on worship practices and gives students practice at several basic worship planning and leading skills. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102, and REL 131 or permission of the program director.
  
  •  

    ML 322 - Pastoral Disciplines for Counseling

    (3)
    This course prepares students for the identity of pastoral counselor and task of pastoral counseling within the context of the faith community. Special attention will be given to various concrete human experiences that the pastor may encounter in the counseling function, how the personhood of the pastor influences the counseling encounter, appropriate boundaries, and how the counseling ministry is conceived in relation to the broader community and other secular entities outside of the church context. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 221
  
  •  

    ML 323 - Leadership in Ministry

    (3)
    Equips students to provide effective pastoral leadership in forming communities of disciples, and integrates a biblical theology of leadership with personal reflection, discernment of contexts, and practical leadership skills. Lecture Prerequisites: Final year in one’s program or permission of the program director.
  
  •  

    ML 324 - Missional Ministry and Evangelism

    (3)
    This course will examine how the mission of the church relates to all ministry practices. Students will learn how to talk effectively and pastorally about the faith and how to teach others to do the same. Students will learn practical skills for building relationships with people and presenting the gospel in culturally appropriate ways, conducting evangelistic Bible studies, and discipling new believers. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102, REL 131 and ML 122 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 325 - Preaching Theory and Method

    (3)
    This class will introduce the student to the practice of preaching through a series of lectures, discussions, readings, and preparatory exercises. The student will be taught an approach to preaching that will provide both a grammar for talking about sermons, and a rudimentary method for sermon construction. Lecture Prerequisites: : ML 101, ML 102, REL 131 and ML 122 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 326 - Restorative Justice

    (3)
    This course introduces students to the essential theories and practices of restorative justice. The course places a particular emphasis on theological and biblical justifications for a restorative approach to justice, and on contrasting restorative justice with retributive justice. Students will contrast notions of crime as a violation of law or an offense against the state with approaches that seek to address the harm done to victims, offenders, and the broader community, and to restore broken relationships. In addition to the underlying philosophical and theological justifications, students will examine current restorative justice practices around the United States and the empirical literature evaluating them, policy frameworks, and practical skills for use in every day interactions. Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102, REL 131, ML 222  and SOC/SOWK 250 or permission of the program director

Music

  
  •  

    MUSC 100 - Music Theory I: Fundamentals in Global Context

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to Western music theory fundamentals such as pitch, scales and modes, key signatures, intervals, triads, meter, and form. The course will consider how Western musical patterns relating time, pitch, and structure are similar and different from musical patterns in the non-West. It will also provide an opportunity to reflect on how and why humans create patterns out of sound and why God created us to be musical. Prerequisite: the ability to read music at a basic level. Corequisite: MUSC 111 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 103 - Understanding and Enjoying Music

    (3)
    FA, SP. This is an introductory course in historically-informed critical and perceptive listening to music. The relationship between musical style and culture is examined as is the forming of style by the manner in which the ingredients and elements of music are employed. Western art music is emphasized but also included are contemporary popular music and either pre-modern music or non- Western music. No previous musical training is required. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    MUSC 106 - American Music

    (3)
    FA. A survey course of American Music for domestic, church, concert, and entertainment uses, emphasizing folk, classical and popular music from a variety of American musical traditions. These traditions include hymns, spirituals, gospel, blues, jazz, rock, hip-hop and classical music. No previous musical training is required. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    MUSC 107 - World Music

    (3)
    SP. This is a study of select musical cultures of Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Europe and the Americas, with a focus on their various musical styles (traditional and contemporary) and the roles of music in these cultures. No previous musical training is required.
  
  •  

    MUSC 108 - Music Theory II: Harmony and Voice Leading

    (3)
    SP. A study of tonal harmony and part-writing, covering triads, inversions, phrases, cadences, nonharmonic tones, and secondary dominants. Prerequisite: MUSC 100  or permission of the instructor. Corequisite: MUSC 112 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 111 - Keyboard Musicianship I

    (1)
    FA. Functional realization at the keyboard of musical-theoretical concepts covered in MUSC 100, such as meter, scales, intervals, and triads. Offered in the music department keyboard/computer lab. Prerequisite: the ability to read music at a basic level. Corequisite: MUSC 100 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 112 - Keyboard Musicianship II

    (1)
    SP. Functional realization at the keyboard of musical-theoretical concepts covered in MUSC 108, such as harmonic progressions, figured bass, and lead sheets. Offered in the music department keyboard/computer lab. Prerequisite: MUSC 111  or permission of instructor. Corequisite: MUSC 108 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 203 - Popular Music

    (3)
    FA. A survey course exploring the historical development, stylistic variety, and cultural significance of western popular music from the mid-nineteenth century to today, including folk music, minstrelsy, blues, jazz, musicals, rock, hip-hop and related genres. No previous musical training is required.
  
  •  

    MUSC 207 - Music Theory III: Chromatic Harmony and Form

    (3)
    FA. A continuation of MUSC 108 - Music Theory II: Harmony and Voice Leading, covering chromatic harmony and form. Prerequisite: MUSC 108 . Corequisite: MUSC 213 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 208 - Music Theory IV: Advanced Techniques

    (3)
    SP. A continuation of MUSC 207 - Music Theory III: Chromatic Harmony and Form, covering tonal and post-tonal compositional techniques of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Prerequisite: MUSC 207 . Corequisite: MUSC 214 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 213 - Aural Skills I

    (1)
    FA. Provides instruction in musicianship skills, including sight singing, dictation, rhythm reading, and improvisation. Usually taken concurrently with MUSC 207. Prerequisite: MUSC 100  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    MUSC 214 - Aural Skills II

    (1)
    SP. A continuation of [MUSC 213]. Provides instruction in musicianship skills, including sight singing, dictation, rhythm reading, and improvisation. Usually taken concurrently with MUSC 208. Prerequisite: MUSC 213  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    MUSC 225 - Music Technology

    (1)
    SP. An introduction to computer-based music technology, including music notation (Sibelius), virtual instruments and synthesis (using Native Instruments software), and MIDI sequencing, audio recording, and editing (using ProTools). Prerequisite: MUSC 100  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    MUSC 236 - Music in Worship

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A historically and theologically-informed course on Christian congregational song, ranging from Old Testament psalms to contemporary praise-worship songs, from traditional Western hymnody to global worship songs, with some attention to cultural context and practical issues. Course requirements include readings, seminar presentations, reports on hymn recordings and visits to churches, as well as practical assignments. No musical prerequisites.
  
  •  

    MUSC 237 - Conducting

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A course in basic conducting techniques and musicianship skills necessary for effective musical leadership. Prerequisite: MUSC 100  or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    MUSC 270 - Half Recital

    (0.5)
    FA, SP. A public performance of a minimum of 25 minutes of music. Prerequisites: four semesters of MUSC 260 - Private Lessons for Credit  and permission of your private-lesson instructor and area supervisor. Corequisite: MUSC 260 . Fee (only for recitals not required by degree program): $100.
  
  •  

    MUSC 301 - Western Music in Historical Context

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A survey of the development of music in the Western classical tradition, highlighting key eras, genres, styles, and composers. Key themes of the course include how musical traditions change over time, how music shapes and reflects the social and intellectual contexts in which it dwells, and how narratives about the past are shaped by worldview. Prerequisite: MUSC 108 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 302 - Music and Global Society

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. An exploration of the ways in which music functions in society around the globe. Using case studies from the West and non-West and drawing from classical, folk, and popular traditions, we will examine a wide variety of social functions for music, noting both the cross-cultural similarities (e.g., the use of music for ritual, dance, and story telling) as well as differences (e.g., a diversity of aesthetics, sounds and styles, genres, contexts, and interpretations of musical activity). Prerequisite: MUSC 100  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MUSC 306 - Topics in Music History

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. Advanced study of selected topics in music history. Subjects will vary from year to year, organized by themes, issues, eras, events, styles, or people of interest in music history. This course may be repeated for credit, assuming the topic varies. Prerequisite: ability to read music at a basic level.
  
  •  

    MUSC 312 - Tonal Counterpoint

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A practical study of melodic writing and counterpoint, using the instrumental works of J.S. Bach as models. Prerequisite: MUSC 207  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MUSC 316 - Arranging and Orchestration

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A study of techniques for arranging and orchestrating existing music for various instrumental ensembles. Technical capabilities of instruments and strategies for effective use of instruments in various musical situations are considered in the context of reflection on stewardship of the sonic order in Creation. Prerequisite: MUSC 108 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 337 - Advanced Conducting

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A course in advanced conducting techniques appropriate to secondary band, orchestra, and choral programs. Prerequisite: MUSC 237 .
  
  •  

    MUSC 340 - Songwriting Seminar

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A course exploring the craft of popular song writing in a seminar context where students both study existing songs and create new songs of their own. In addition to learning techniques related to writing and analyzing lyrics, melodies, chords, and arrangements, students will learn practical skills related to the industry, such as collaboration, writing lead sheets, copywriting creative work, and using tools and technology relevant to song writing. By the end of the semester each student will create a demo of at least one song they have written. Prerequisite: MUSC 100  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MUSC 370 - Full Recital

    (1)
    FA, SP. A public performance of a minimum of 50 minutes of music. Prerequisites: four semesters of MUSC 260 - Private Lessons for Credit  and permission of your private-lesson instructor and area supervisor. Corequisite: MUSC 260 . Fee (only for recitals not required by degree program): $100.
  
  •  

    MUSC 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Music department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Music department. 

  
  •  

    MUSC 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair.
  
  •  

    MUSC 395 - Critical Perspectives in Music

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A capstone seminar course for the music major designed to nurture Christian reflection on music as an academic discipline and area of cultural practice. Readings challenge students to engage with musical aesthetics, performance, composition, theory and analysis, and history in light of developing trends in scholarship, and to draw upon the insights of Christian theology to inform critical thinking about music. The course contributes to an understanding of vocation in music and a developing commitment to responsible stewardship in the musical world. Students lead class sessions on musical topics of their choice and write a significant essay in an area of vocational interest. Prerequisites: MUSC 208 , MUSC 301  or MUSC 302 , Biblical Foundations I or Theological Foundations I, Developing a Christian Mind.

Music: Private Lessons

All full-time Calvin University students may enroll in private or instrument lessons. Part-time students and dual-enrollment students must first receive permission from the department chair before enrolling in private lessons.

An additional fee will be charged for all private music lessons, based on the type and length of the lesson; see music department website for current rates. Refunds will be issued to students who drop lessons, according to Calvin’s reimbursement guidelines for tuition refunds. No refund of lesson fees will be issued after 38 calendar days. See the Financial Information  pages in this catalog and the Music Department website for details.

Students enrolling in private lessons for the first time at Calvin University may be required to take a placement audition. For a complete description of private music lesson policies and expectations, please see the Music Department website.

  
  •  

    MUSC 030 - Non-credit Private Lessons

    (0).
    FA, SP. Course includes twelve 30-minute sessions of private instruction in applied music. Lessons are pass/fail.  Fee: $360.
  
  •  

    MUSC 060 - Non-credit Private Lessons

    (0)
    FA, SP. Course includes twelve 60-minute sessions of private instruction in applied music. Lessons are pass/fail.  Fee: $720.
  
  •  

    MUSC 221 - Piano Accompanying in Worship

    (1/0)
    Offered based on demand. Private lessons in effective leadership of congregational singing from the piano. Also includes instruction in other kinds of accompanying that occurs in worship and some study of appropriate solo repertory. These lessons do not fulfill the private lessons requirement for music majors emphasizing applied music in piano.  Fee: $360 Offered on demand.
  
  •  

    MUSC 240 - Composition Lessons for Credit

    (1)
    FA, SP. Course includes 12 hour-long sessions of private instruction in composition. In addition to preparation for weekly lessons, students will be expected to participate in studio classes with fellow composition students, write scores for their compositions using music notation software, and organize performances or recordings of their work for evaluation. Lesson fees apply. Prerequisites: MUSC 108  and MUSC 225  or permission of the instructor. Fee: $900
  
  •  

    MUSC 260 - Private Lessons for Credit

    (1)
    FA, SP. Course includes 12 sixty-minute sessions of private instruction in applied music. In addition to preparation for weekly lessons, students will be expected to participate in studio classes, perform in joint student recitals, and take a jury (final performance exam) at the end of the semester. Fee: $900.

Music: Ensembles

Membership in ensembles is open to Calvin students who meet the requirements of musicianship. All students who want to participate in any of the music ensembles at Calvin may audition by arrangement with the conductor prior to each semester.

All ensembles carry academic credit. Ensembles may not be audited. If a student is already registered for 17 semeter hours, they may register for the ensemble for 0 credit to avoid the overload fee. See the Music Department website for more details.

  
  •  

    MUSC 117 - Jazz Band

    (1)
    FA, SP. Representative works in jazz band literature are studied and prepared for concert performance. Meets twice a week and is open to students in all class levels who meet the requirements of musicianship.
  
  •  

    MUSC 118 - Collaborative Musicianship

    (0.5)
    FA, SP. Study and performance of music for small ensembles. Instrumentalists, pianists, and singers may take this course. Students are expected to participate in the selection of music to be studied and to assume leadership in organizing ensembles, rehearsing, and performing, with guidance and support provided by music faculty. Membership is open to all students who meet the demands of musicianship.
  
  •  

    MUSC 131 - Campus Choir

    (1)
    FA, SP. Study and performance of choral literature related to the practice of Christian worship throughout the history of the church and in many cultures. Emphasis on vocal and musical development, as well as on the theological, historical, and liturgical dimensions of selected choral repertoire. Open to all students who meet the requirements of voice and musicianship.
  
  •  

    MUSC 141 - Capella

    (1)
    FA, SP. Representative works in the field of choral literature are studied and prepared for concert performance. Membership is maintained at a set limit and is open only to those who meet the demands of voice, sight reading, and choral musicianship. Prerequisite: ordinarily one year of experience in a college choir.
  
  •  

    MUSC 151 - Symphonic Band

    (1)
    FA, SP. Representative works in the chamber wind and concert band literature are studied and prepared for concert performance. Meets three times weekly and is open to all students who wish to participate in a concert band.
  
  •  

    MUSC 161 - Wind Ensemble

    (1)
    FA, SP. Representative works in the chamber wind and concert band literature are studied and prepared for concert performance. Meets four times weekly. Membership is limited to a set instrumentation and is open to all students who meet the demands of musicianship.
  
  •  

    MUSC 171 - Orchestra

    (1)
    FA, SP. Representative works in the field of chamber and symphony orchestra literature are studied and prepared for concert performance. Open to all students via live audition who meet the demands of musicianship.
  
  •  

    MUSC 181 - Oratorio Chorus

    (.5)
    FA. The study of representative works of the great masters of choral writing with a view to public performance with orchestra. Handel’s Messiah is performed annually at Christmas. Open to all who meet the requirements of voice and musicianship.
  
  •  

    MUSC 182 - Gospel Choir

    (1)
    FA, SP. Faculty directed vocal ensemble performing representative music in this particular genre and in preparation for concert appearances. Membership is open to students, faculty, staff, and alumni.
  
  •  

    MUSC 191 - Women’s Chorale

    (1)
    FA, SP. A women’s honor choir open to all classes devoted to singing a wide range of challenging treble literature, both sacred and secular. Membership is maintained at a set limit and is open only to those who meet the demands of voice, sight reading, and choral musicianship. This ensemble tours, presents concerts and leads worship services.
  
  •  

    MUSC 193 - Collegium Musicum

    (.5)
    Offered based on demand. Offered upon sufficient demand. An ensemble for the study and performance of instrumental and vocal music of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods. Reproductions of early wind, string, percussion, and keyboard instruments are used. Open to all students, staff, faculty, and community members by audition. No previous experience in early music performance is necessary. Rehearses two hours per week. Offered upon sufficient demand.

Nonprofit Management: Graduate

  
  •  

    NOPM 607 - Nonprofit Boards and Community Leadership

    (3)
    SP. Nonprofit board of directors are integral to the process of governing and achieving effective community collaborations and public/private partnerships. This course incorporates and applies organizational behavior and theory to explore the leadership role, responsibilities, and interaction between board members and the executive director. Areas of examination include a comparison of different governing models, key questions to consider in board selection and composition, the responsibilities of advisory boards, working with committees, and the expectations of the board in the area of fundraising.  Prerequisite: admission into the graduate business program.
  
  •  

    NOPM 608 - Nonprofit Financial Management

    (3)
    SU. Why are some nonprofit organizations more efficient and stewardly than others? This course establishes a foundation in financial management for those with minimal or no experience in accounting.  Areas of emphasis include knowledge and skills needed for distributing and managing resources, and for performing and using analyses and reports to effectively steward the financial health of the organization. Topics include key accounting principles, an overview of financial statements and how they are used in the budget development process and cash flow analysis, understanding the audit report, maximizing investment policy, and the responsibilities regarding government compliance. All of these will be looked at through the lens of ethical standards.
  
  •  

    NOPM 609 - Designing an Effective Nonprofit Organization

    (3)
    SU. Nonprofit organizations, whether newly developed or established, need to incorporate methods and processes to be sustainable, This course focuses on how to design a nonprofit organization capable of raising the human and financial resources to sustain the organization as well as emerging methods for effective programming and specific nonprofit evaluation methods. Learn the various aspects of resource development including fund-raising strategies, processes, trends and ethics, public and private grant writing, submission, measurement and evaluation. The course emphasizes the examination of current trends in earned-income strategies, social entrepreneurship, and maximizing available ‘corporate social responsibility’ resources. Underscoring the importance of volunteers in achieving nonprofit goals, the course also focuses on approaches to volunteer development, volunteer recruitment, training, retention/theories of motivation, and leadership and certain ethical issues associated with volunteers. Prerequisite: admission into the graduate business program

Nursing

  
  •  

    NURS 307 - Theory: Community Based and Mental Health Nursing

    (4)
    FA. In this theory course, students will explore the theoretical foundations of the discipline of nursing, basic concepts of community based nursing, and mental health promotion and protection of individuals across the lifespan in the context of their families and communities. Prerequisites: limited to students who have been admitted to the upper division nursing major.
  
  •  

    NURS 308 - Strategies: Community Based and Mental Health Nursing

    (4)
    FA. This course provides students with the opportunity to develop strategies for health promotion and health protection for use in community based nursing and mental health nursing. Students will develop basic competency in health assessment, communication, technical skills, nursing informatics, the nursing process, and critical thinking. Students will be introduced to basic principles of pharmacology as well as the various categories of psychotropic drugs. Prerequisites: limited to students who have been admitted to the upper division nursing major.
  
  •  

    NURS 309 - Practicum: Community Based and Mental Health Nursing

    (4)
    FA. This practicum course provides the student with an introduction to community based nursing as well as the opportunity to implement strategies to promote and protect the mental health of persons across the lifespan. Students will assume basic roles of the professional nurse and utilize skills of assessment, communication, critical thinking, and nursing process to design and provide empirically based nursing care to individuals in a variety of acute care and community-based settings. NURS 309 will be graded as pass/fail (CR - completed as required/NC - not completed).  Prerequisites: limited to students who have been admitted to the upper division nursing major.
  
  •  

    NURS 327 - Theory: Pregnant Women, Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    (4)
    SP. This theory course will focus on health promotion and health protection concepts for pregnant women, infants, children, and adolescents in the context of their families and communities. Topics will include primary, secondary, and tertiary health protection and health promotion from the perspective of community based care. Prerequisites: NURS 307, NURS 308, and NURS 309.
  
  •  

    NURS 328 - Strategies: Pregnant Women, Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    (4)
    SP. This course provides students with opportunities to develop health promotion and health protection strategies in caring for pregnant women, infants, children, and adolescents. Students will develop knowledge and skills in health and cultural assessment, communication, nutrition, pharmacology, psychomotor activities, and nursing informatics systems related to care of pregnant women, infants, children, and adolescents. Prerequisites: NURS 307, NURS 308, and NURS 309.
  
  •  

    NURS 329 - Practicum: Pregnant Women, Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    (4)
    SP. The student will utilize the nursing process to promote and protect the health of pregnant women, infants, children, and adolescents in the context of their families and communities. Students will spend six weeks with pregnant women and infants and six weeks with children and adolescents in both acute care settings and a variety of community settings. Students will have opportunities to apply knowledge of health promotion and primary, secondary, and tertiary health protection strategies. The focus of the course is on engagement in clinical decision making skills and problem solving in working with these clients. NURS 329 will be graded as pass/fail (CR - completed as required / NC - not completed). Prerequisites: NURS 307, NURS 308, and NURS 309.
  
  •  

    NURS 357 - Theory: Young, Middle, and Older Adults

    (4)
    FA. This course will focus on the concepts of health promotion and health protection for young, middle, and older adults in the context of their families and communities. Topics will include primary, secondary, and tertiary health protection and health promotion including community based care and role development. The student will learn about partnerships with adults to actively promote health as well as protecting health during times of acute and chronic illness. Prerequisites: NURS 327, NURS 328, and NURS 329.
  
  •  

    NURS 358 - Strategies: Young, Middle, and Older Adults

    (4)
    FA. This course provides the student with opportunities to develop health promotion and primary, secondary, and tertiary health protection strategies in care delivery for adults. Students will develop knowledge and skills in health and cultural assessment of adults, pharmacology, communication, nutrition, psychomotor activities, and nursing informatics systems related to care of adult clients. Prerequisites: NURS 327, NURS 328, and NURS 329.
  
  •  

    NURS 359 - Practicum: Young, Middle, and Older Adults

    (4)
    FA. The student will utilize the nursing process to promote and protect the health of adults in the context of their families and communities. Students care for young, middle, and older adults in acute care settings and visit a variety of community settings. Students will have opportunities to apply knowledge of health promotion and primary, secondary, and tertiary health protection theory and strategies. The focus of the course is on engagement in clinical decision making skills and problem solving with adult clients. NURS 359 will be graded pass/fail (CR - completed as required/NC - not completed).  Prerequisites: NURS 327 , NURS 328 , and NURS 329 .
  
  •  

    NURS 377 - Theory: Community Focused Nursing and Leadership/Management

    (4)
    SP. This theory course is focused on health promotion/health protection for the community as client and leadership/management principles that are used by the professional nurse. Prerequisites: NURS 357, NURS 358, and NURS 359.
  
  •  

    NURS 378 - Strategies: Synthesis of Nursing Care across the Lifespan

    (1)
    SP. In this nursing laboratory course, students will synthesize techniques of health promotion and health protection for and with individuals, families, and groups across the lifespan in complex health situations. Students will focus on critical thinking and decision making principles in nursing practice. The course will include multifaceted, laboratory simulations that require students to analyze and synthesize assessment data and design care with other health care professionals. Students will integrate their knowledge of the Christian perspective, core virtues, and diversity into the care that they design. Prerequisites: NURS 357, NURS 358 and NURS 359.
  
  •  

    NURS 379 - Practicum: Community Focused Nursing and Leadership/Management

    (4)
    SP. This course will afford students the opportunity to partner with communities as well as interdisciplinary groups of health care providers for the purpose of promoting and protecting health. Partnerships with communities offer opportunities for the student to assist the community to develop the best health care possible for diverse cultural groups. Partnerships with interdisciplinary staff members allow for principles of management and leadership to be integrated into nursing practice. NURS 379 will be graded as pass/fail (CR - completed as required / NC - not completed). Prerequisites: NURS 357, NURS 358 and NURS 359.
  
  •  

    NURS 380 - Critical Reflections

    (3)
    SP. This reflective course will lead the student into inquiry about the relationship between Christian faith and the discipline of nursing. It will consider how the Reformed Christian worldview informs the metaparadigm of nursing as well as current issues facing the profession. Prerequisites: NURS 357, NURS 358 and NURS 359.
  
  •  

    NURS 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  •  

    NURS 385 - Nursing Internship (Curricular Practical Training-CPT)

    (0)
    This course is an optional independent study course, in which students will participate in off-campus internships in acute or long term care settings during summer months or during the academic year to complement their formal learning experiences. They will work a minimum of 80 hours over the summer, or during a semester. Prerequisites: NURS 307, NURS 308, and NURS 309, GPA of 2.5 or higher. Application for approval of activities must be confirmed by the department’s internship coordinator prior to the internship.
  
  •  

    NURS 482 - Advanced Roles in Nursing

    (1)
    FA. This seminar will explore the various graduate school options within the discipline of nursing with a specific focus on nursing research and advanced practice. It will investigate the process of graduate education from application to the acquisition of a position following graduate school. Graduate education, national priorities for nursing research, translational research, and evidence based practice will be explored in light of health care reform. The seminar will approach graduate education as means to prepare for lifelong Christian service in God’s world. This course is an elective in the Department of Nursing and will be offered once each academic year. Prerequisite: Junior status.

Philosophy: Elementary Courses

  
  •  

    PHIL 153 - Fundamental Questions in Philosophy

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introduction to fundamental questions about God, the world, and human life and how we know about them. These questions are addressed through the study of historically significant texts, primarily from the Western philosophical tradition. An emphasis is placed on philosophical reflection and discussion, constructing and evaluating arguments, reading and interpreting philosophical texts, writing clear expository prose, and engaging in faith-oriented and faith based inquiry. The course aims to help students use philosophy to respond to central issues in human life and in contemporary society.
 

Page: 1 <- 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14