2021-2022 Catalog 
    
    Dec 01, 2022  
2021-2022 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Congregational and Ministry Studies

  
  •  

    CMS 151 - Church and Society

    (3)
    FA. This course introduces students to the study of human social activity through the lens of the church as a societal institution in the North American context. It also functions as an introduction to the field of congregational studies, analyzing and understanding the social dynamics of the church through social science investigation.
  
  •  

    CMS 251 - Theological Reflections on Ministry Practices

    (1)
    FA, SP. Students learn to address specific situations, problems, challenges, and opportunities in ministry through interdisciplinary readings, theological reflection, and strategic planning exercises. Each section of 251 focuses on a unique topic. Students are encouraged to enroll in the course up to 4 times.
  
  •  

    CMS 252 - Introduction to Missions

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A general introduction to Christian missions in biblical and historical perspective. This course surveys the biblical and theological foundations for missions, and the church’s interpretation and implementation of the task of spreading the gospel. The methods, challenges, successes, and failures of Christian missionary activity will be considered. Prerequisite: REL 121  or REL 131 .
  
  •  

    CMS 374 - Youth and Family Ministry

    (2)
    SP. This course provides a forum for students to investigate and evaluate a variety of models of ministry to youth. We will employ a variety of methods including, but not limited to, class discussions and presentations by both students and youth ministry experts on theological reflections of key issues associated with youth ministry. The course is specially designed for cross registration with students from Calvin University and Calvin Theological Seminary. Prerequisites: junior or senior status. The course is taught at Calvin Theological Seminary.
  
  •  

    CMS 375 - Ministry, Leadership, and Community Development

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A study of both the theology and methods used by church and parachurch organizations in local community development. Consideration will be given to developing a theology of leadership and service for local churches and ministries within their respective neighborhood and community. Particular attention will be given to the church office of deacon as a resource for church and ministry leadership and service. The course is an elective part of the Ministry Leadership Minor, and is required for students pursuing the community development emphasis within the minor.
  
  •  

    CMS 378 - A Christian Calling: Proclaiming Jubilee as a Christian Leader

    (3)
    SP. The aim of this course is to describe the strategic role that leaders within the church have played and continue to play in the economy of gifts God gives to his people, and to assist twelve (12) upper-level students, Jubilee Fellows, to discern whether God might be calling them to become a church leader. Prerequisites: Admission to the Jubilee Fellows program.
  
  •  

    CMS 381 - Ministry Studies Internship

    (3)
    FA. This course links students to internship opportunities in congregations where they are assigned specific responsibilities in congregational and ministry studies. Students work a minimum of eight hours per week under the supervision of an approved on-site supervisor. The weekly academic seminar accompanying the internship involves readings, reflective journals, and a major paper/project and presentation. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, permission of the instructor, and completion of at least two courses in the minor.
  
  •  

    CMS 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  •  

    CMS 390 - Independent Study

    (3)
    FA, SP. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

Data Science

  
  •  

    DATA 101 - Data Science for Everyone

    (3)
    FA, SP. Students experience today’s data deluge by exploring its numerous sources, investigating the stories it tells, and examining its implications in God’s world by applying concepts of artificial intelligence (e.g. machine learning), high performance computing, visualization and decision making methodologies. Students employ curiosity, intuition and innovation by working with software resources to extract valuable information from the glut of data facing many of the disciplines. Students will use existing large data sets and employ software tools to discover patterns through visualization and quantification. Students incorporate these experiences into a semester project. Students also investigate the ethical considerations of data availability and analysis along with career options in the field of data science. Lab fee: $15.
  
  •  

    DATA 175 - Productivity Software

    (3)
    FA, SP. An integrated view of the use of desktop software to access, manage and analyze data from multiple disparate sources. In addition to spreadsheet, database, and word processing components, students will learn how to automate many tasks with macros and basic programming. Lab fee: $15.
  
  •  

    DATA 202 - Predictive Analytics

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to the conceptual foundations and practical skills needed to transform data into useful forms and apply predictive analytics to discover patterns and anticipate trends. Primary focus is on the core skills and concepts needed to pull data from a range of sources; to filter, transform, and combine data sets to prepare them for analysis; and to construct quantitative summaries and basic visualizations. Programming is used throughout to assemble data-processing pipelines. Students will also discuss ethical and social considerations of data collection and data-driven systems. Prerequisites: (a) DATA 175  or DATA 101 , STAT 243 , or STAT 245 ; and (b) CS 104 , CS 106 , or CS CS 108 . A minimum grade of C in CS 104 CS 106 , or CS 108  is required. Lab fee: $15.
  
  •  

    DATA 303 - Applied Modeling and Visualization

    (3)
    SP. In this senior project capstone course, students will apply modeling techniques and visualization tools to a large project and explore the related social and ethical considerations. Students will select problems from domain areas, collect and manage data related to their problems, apply appropriate modeling techniques, use visualization tools to extract new knowledge and insights from their data, and give presentations on their discoveries. Students will use free and commercial visualization tools, and learn about their tradeoffs. The course will also explore social, ethical, legal, and professional issues that arise in collecting, storing and analyzing data, using case studies and discussions informed by a reformed, Christian perspective.  Prerequisites: DATA 202, STAT 245, or permission of the instructor. Lab fee: $15.
  
  •  

    DATA 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.
    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.

Dutch

  
  •  

    DUTC 101 - Elementary Dutch I

    (4)
    FA. An introductory course in the comprehension and use of spoken and written Dutch and an exposure to the people and culture of the Netherlands and Flanders, Belgium.
  
  •  

    DUTC 102 - Elementary Dutch II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of DUTC 101.
  
  •  

    DUTC 201 - Intermediate Dutch I

    (4)
    FA. Further development of skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Dutch. Includes systematic grammar review and the introduction to finer points of grammar and idiomatic use of the language. Cultural topics are explored through film and short literary texts. Prerequisite: DUTC 102  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    DUTC 202 - Intermediate Dutch II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of DUTC 201. Further development of skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Dutch. Ongoing mastery of grammar and idiomatic use of the language. Cultural topics are explored through film and short literary texts.
  
  •  

    DUTC 305 - Dutch Literature I

    (3)
    Study and discussion of several Dutch literary texts representative of the classical and modern periods of Dutch literature. Offered based on demand. See department chair.
  
  •  

    DUTC 306 - Dutch Literature II

    (3)
    A continuation of DUTC 305. Offered based on demand. See department chair.
  
  •  

    DUTC 309 - Netherlandic Civilization

    (3)
    A study conducted in the English language of several important aspects of Netherlandic civilization: Literature, history, religion, art, architecture, social structure, and education. Offered based on demand. See department chair.
  
  •  

    DUTC 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.

Economics

  
  •  

    ECON 151 - Principles of Economics

    (3)
    SP. A one-semester introduction to the institutions of the North American market economy, including the determinants of resource allocation, income distribution, prices, production, income and employment levels, and economic growth. Topics include international economic relations and the role of government in the economy. Students intending to major or minor in economics or business should take the two-semester 221/222 sequence.
  
  •  

    ECON 221 - Principles of Microeconomics

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course involves a study of the institutions of mixed-market economies, including their role in resource allocation, the determination of prices & outputs, and income distribution. Topics include the role of the government in the economy and environmental impact of economic activity.
  
  •  

    ECON 222 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    (3)
    FA, SP. A continuation of ECON 221. A study and evaluation of the determination of national income, including analysis of consumer spending and saving patterns, business investment, government spending, taxation, monetary policy, unemployment, and inflation. The course includes an introduction to international trade and finance. Prerequisite: ECON 221.
  
  •  

    ECON 232 - Sustainability Economics

    (3)
    A study of environmental problems in relationship to Christian stewardship, sustainability, economic efficiency, and justice. Topics include balancing economic activity and environmental impact; measurement of the costs and benefits of environmental policies; and design and evaluation of public policies and business practices to address these problems. No prerequisite. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    ECON 233 - Economics of Energy and Sustainability

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to economics with detailed focus on energy and sustainability issues.  Students will explore interactions among economic, social, natural, and technological systems through the lens of sustainability; including global energy resource scarcity and historical patterns of economic growth and how they impact individuals and society through local and global economic systems. Topics include definitions of sustainability, economic systems, and energy markets: energy production and consumption systems, Biblical and ethical perspectives on consumption and production of goods and energy, and efficiency and equity of resource allocation. The course includes experiential learning excursions. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    ECON 236 - Emerging Economies

    (3)
    An examination of the economies of key emerging nations: China, India, Brazil, and Indonesia. The course starts with an overview of the global economy and the international financial system. Students consider how legal, technological, political, and cultural environments influence economic and business relations between countries. The benefits of trade, national trade policies and international cooperation are explored. Each of the four emerging nations is examined within this broad context, focusing on relevant economic history, transition to a market-oriented economy, current institutions, opportunities, and challenges. Prerequisite: ECON 151 or ECON 221 and ECON 222. (ECON 222 may be taken concurrently with this course.) Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    ECON 237 - Regional Economies of the World

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course focuses on the economies of a particular region of the world. African, Asian and Latin American economies are studied on a rotating basis. The course begins with a study of basic differences in economic systems and institutions of modern economies. These concepts are then applied to more detailed historical study of a number of key regional economies. The possibility of a distinct regional development model is considered. Prerequisite: ECON 221 and ECON 222 or ECON 151.
  
  •  

    ECON 241 - Health Economics and Health Policy

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introduction to economics in the context of a study of health economics and health policy, with detailed focus on the U.S. health care system. The intent of the course is to develop an understanding of economic principles that can be used with other criteria to evaluate the historical and future direction of the U.S. health care system. Topics include efficiency and equity of resource allocation, ethical perspectives on health care access, history and current direction of U.S. and international health care policy, and the development and evolution of insurance, hospital and health care provider markets. This course is recommended for students seeking a professional career in health care management, human resources, medicine, mental health professions, nursing, public health or public policy. Not open to first-year students.
  
  •  

    ECON 325 - Managerial Economics/Intermediate Microeconomics

    (4)
    FA. An intermediate-level study of microeconomic theory with applications to managerial decision-making in such areas as market and risk analysis, demand forecasting, production and cost analysis, product pricing, profit planning, and consumer theory. Goals of firms and the use of economic theory in achieving them are examined and evaluated. Calculus concepts used in the course will be taught as part of the course. Prerequisites: ECON 221 ; DATA 175 ; and STAT 143 , STAT 243 , or STAT 343 .
  
  •  

    ECON 326 - Business Cycles and Forecasting/Intermediate Macroeconomics

    (4)
    SP. An intermediate-level study of macroeconomic theory emphasizing modeling and analysis of general business activity and the implications of changing business conditions for business planning and public policy. Computer lab work is used to understand the implications of economic policy. Prerequisites: ECON 221  and ECON 222 ; DATA 175 ; and STAT 143 , STAT 243 , or STAT 343 .
  
  •  

    ECON 330 - Urban Growth and Development

    (3)
    An introduction to the forces behind the economic growth and development of urban areas around the world. The class examines how economists measure the quality of life of urban areas and what the likely economic features of city and suburban life will be in the coming decades. Students critique urban economic policies by examining how they affect resilience, sustainability, and prosperity. Students also explore to what extent Christians might affirm or object to the way in which urban economic forces and public policies generate economic growth, affect ecological systems, and distribute goods and services across race, social class, and future generations. Prerequisites: ECON 151, or ECON 221 and ECON 222, or ECON 232, or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    ECON 331 - Money and Financial Markets

    (3)
    FA. A study of the principles of money, banking, and credit with emphasis on monetary theory and policy and their role in domestic and international economics. Prerequisite: ECON 221 and ECON 222.
  
  •  

    ECON 335 - Human Resource Economics

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A study of labor markets and their relationship to the economy as a whole, including labor-force participation, human-capital formation, wage theory, discrimination, unemployment, income distribution, labor unions, and related public policies. Prerequisites: ECON 221 and ECON 222.
  
  •  

    ECON 337 - World Poverty and Economic Development

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A study of the characteristics of poor nations in many regions of the world, and of factors that cause and influence economic development within countries. After examining conditions within poor nations, students analyze theories of economic growth and economic development. Problems, possibilities, and policies are analyzed in each of these topic areas. Prerequisites: ECON 221 and ECON 222. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    ECON 338 - International Trade and Finance

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A study of international economic relations, stressing the fundamentals of international trade and international finance theories, the balance of payments, problems of international disequilibrium, trade barriers, and efforts to promote international economic stability and growth. Prerequisites: ECON 221 and ECON 222.
  
  •  

    ECON 339 - Government Finance and Public Policy

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A study of the economic effects of government spending and taxation on resource allocation and on the distribution of income. Students analyze the economic role of government, and current policy issues and the political process regarding taxation and government spending. Prerequisites: ECON 221 and ECON 222. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    ECON 343 - Introduction to Econometrics

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to econometrics, the use of advanced statistics to investigate economic and business questions. Emphasis on evaluating the quality of available information, developing theory-directed models, conducting original research, and interpreting and critically evaluating the published work of others. Topics include the classical linear regression model, time series, heteroskedastic and autocorrelated disturbance models, and selection models. Prerequisite: STAT 143 or its equivalent.
  
  •  

    ECON 345 - Advanced Topics in Economics

    (3)
    SP. This course builds on ECON 325 and ECON 326 to provide a deeper, more comprehensive understanding of microeconomic and macroeconomic theories and applications. Covered topics include welfare analysis, game theory, economics of information, uncertainty, general equilibrium, contracts and moral hazards, inter-temporal decision-making, open-economy macroeconomics, and economic growth. Prerequisites: ECON 325, ECON 326, and the major’s statistics and calculus cognates.
  
  •  

    ECON 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.
    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  •  

    ECON 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.
  
  •  

    ECON 395 - Seminar in Economic Thought

    (3)
    SP. This course considers the history of economic thought during the last two millennia. This involves a careful consideration of major historical schools of thought about economic culture, beginning with the classical civilizations and ending with contemporary methodological approaches to economics. Crosslisted as IDIS 395. Prerequisite: Senior economics or PPE major status, or permission of the instructor.

English

For more detailed descriptions of the courses offered for any given semester, see the English Department website.

  
  •  

    ENGL 100 - Enhanced Written Rhetoric I

    (3)
    FA. The first part of a year-long enhanced course sequence in written rhetoric. See the complete sequence description under ENGL 102 . Enrollment in English 100/ENGL 102  is by special arrangement with the English Department and the Center for Student Success.
  
  •  

    ENGL 101 - Written Rhetoric

    (3)
    FA, SP. A course in which students write several academic essays in which they practice rhetorical strategies, research-based argumentation, and methods of composing effective prose. In the process of writing these essays, students consider language as a means of discovering truth about God, the world, and themselves, and they explore its potential to communicate truth and, thereby, to transform culture.
  
  •  

    ENGL 102 - Enhanced Written Rhetoric II

    (3)
    SP. The second part of a year-long, enhanced course sequence in Written Rhetoric. Students enrolled in ENGL 100 /102 write expository essays, focusing particularly on how to conduct academic research, producing research-based argumentation. In the process of writing these essays and mastering conventions of language, students consider language as a means of discovering truth about God, the world, and themselves; and they explore its potential to communicate truth and, thereby, to transform culture. Prerequisite: ENGL 100 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 103 - Writing Studio

    (1)
    SP. Writing Studio offers students extra support in academic writing in a small group tutoring context. The focus of instruction is the students’ own writing from other courses. Instructors and tutors help students understand writing assignments—reflect upon specific guidelines, goals, and contexts—and provide support through the drafting, revision, and editing phases. Course may be repeated up to three times for elective credit; graded credit/no credit.
  
  •  

    ENGL 200 - Introduction to Global Literature

    (3)
    An overview of literatures from around the world. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a time period or specific region. 
  
  •  

    ENGL 205 - Special Topics

    (3)
    An introductory examination of literary topics chosen by the instructor.
  
  •  

    ENGL 210 - Introduction to Early British Literature

    (3)
    An introductory examination of British literature from the medieval period through 1660. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a specific time period within this broader range.
  
  •  

    ENGL 215 - Introduction to Later British Literature

    (3)
    An introductory examination of British literature from 1660 to the present. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a specific time period within this broader range.
  
  •  

    ENGL 220 - Introduction to American Literature

    (3)
    An introductory examination of American literature. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a specific time period within this broader range.
  
  •  

    ENGL 230 - Introduction to Genre

    (3)
    An introductory examination of literary genre. The course may focus on the characteristics of a single genre, such as poetry, novel, plays, etc, or of multiple genres.
  
  •  

    ENGL 240 - Basic Journalism

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to reporting for news media, using Associated Press guidelines, to write for digital and print publications. This course focuses on methods of news gathering, interviewing, and research with particular emphasis on reporting about current affairs. Students analyze trends and discuss ethical issues in contemporary journalism across a variety of platforms, but their primary focus is on the writing and editing of news.
  
  •  

    ENGL 241 - Business Writing

    (3)
    A course introducing students to the kinds of writing, presentations, and social media options used in business-related fields. Students practice composing the types of professional communication that they are likely to craft on the job. The class is conducted as a workshop; students consult with each other and with the instructor. Each student submits several projects. The class also includes a group report (with written, multimedia, and oral portions), in-class writing, and the use of presentation software.  Prerequisite: completion of ENGL 101  with a grade of C+ or above.
  
  •  

    ENGL 260 - The Craft of Writing

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introductory creative writing course. Students write in a variety of genres, including poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students read and analyze models for each genre, engage in peer review, and practice revision strategies to create a portfolio of finished work. Students explore a Christian perspective on literary art and the writing life. This course prepares for more advanced work in creative writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 101  or ENGL 102  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    ENGL 270 - Introduction to Linguistics

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of some of the more interesting and important characteristics of language, with particular attention given to the processes of language acquisition; to patterns and effects of linguistic change through time; to variations in language from region to region, social class to social class, and gender to gender; and to the assumptions informing the study of various grammars.
  
  •  

    ENGL 275 - English Syntax

    (3)
    FA, SP. A course that reviews the fundamentals of English grammar and examines the possibilities and limitations of teaching grammar in the ESL classroom. Students must research or practice the teaching of some of this grammatical material. Prerequisite: ENGL 101  or ENGL 102 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 290 - Ways of Reading

    (3)
    An intermediate course that introduces students to theoretical and theological approaches to reading, examining the assumptions and questions that people use to understand a written text. Special attention is paid to ways in which Christians have read both their own foundational text (the Bible) and also secular literature. None None
  
  •  

    ENGL 300 - Advanced Studies in Global Literature

    (3)
    A focused study of literature that crosses borders. This course may forefront writing from a discrete nation or examine texts belonging to a global, cosmopolitan movement, such as postcolonialism. 
  
  •  

    ENGL 305 - Advanced Special Topics

    (3)
    A focused study of a literary topic chosen by the instructor.
  
  •  

    ENGL 310 - Advanced Studies in Early British Literature

    (3)
    A focused study of British literatures from the medieval period to the Restoration. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a specific time period within this broader range.
  
  •  

    ENGL 315 - Advanced Studies in Later British Literature

    (3)
    A focused study of British literatures from the Restoration to the present. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a specific time period within this broader range.
  
  •  

    ENGL 320 - Advanced Studies in American Literature

    (3)
    A focused study of American literature. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a specific time period within this broader range.
  
  •  

    ENGL 325 - Advanced Studies in Children’s and Adolescent Literature

    (3)
    A focused study of children’s and adolescent literature. The course may be thematic or genre-focused, or it may concentrate on a time period or specific region.
  
  •  

    ENGL 330 - Advanced Studies in Genre

    (3)
    A focused, advanced study of a medium or literary genre. The course may focus on the characteristics of a single genre, such as poetry, novel, plays, etc, or of multiple genres.
  
  •  

    ENGL 335 - Advanced Studies in a Major Author

    (3)
    A focused study of a major literary figure.
  
  •  

    ENGL 340 - Academic and Professional Writing

    (3)
    A course in rhetoric and composition designed for students who wish to prepare for writing in their professions or in graduate school. Students enhance their abilities to create and edit effective writing in the genres that they will encounter as professionals.
  
  •  

    ENGL 341 - Feature Journalism

    (3)
    SP. A course in the art of writing feature stories for digital publications, newspapers, and magazines. Students research, write, and edit several substantial articles for different audiences, paying particular attention to matters of strategy and style as called for by those audiences. Topics range from profiles of people to articles about science, history, religion, art, or politics. Although the primary focus of the course is writing, students do explore the possibilities of multimedia journalism.
  
  •  

    ENGL 342 - Writing in Digital Environments

    (3)
    A course that engages students in writing rhetorically effective digital texts. Students will apply rhetorical, aesthetic, and technical principles as they write extensively in a variety of genres such as social platforms, chat apps, short-form video, and niche newsletters. Special attention will be paid to questions of authorship and copyright when writing in digital environments. Prerequisite: ENGL 101  or ENGL 102 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 344 - Special Topics in Advanced Professional Writing

    (3)
    A focused study of professional writing in a particular subgenre or topic area.
  
  •  

    ENGL 350 - Teaching of Writing

    (3)
    FA. A course in the theory and practice of teaching composition in middle and high school writing and language arts programs. Extensive reading complements frequent writing about and practice in all elements involved in teaching writing. Majors and minors in English secondary education programs must take this course before enrolling in EDUC 346.
  
  •  

    ENGL 352 - Teaching of Literature

    (3)
    SP. A course in the theory and practice of teaching literature in middle and high school language arts programs. Extensive reading of literature along with the study and practice of teaching literature. Majors and minors in English secondary education programs must take this course prior to enrolling in EDUC 346.
  
  •  

    ENGL 359 - Seminar in Principles of and Practices in Secondary Education

    (3)
    SP. A course in perspectives on, principles of, and practices in the teaching of English on the secondary level. This course should be taken concurrently with EDUC 346. Before taking ENGL 359, students must pass the English Department Screening Exam and complete ENGL 350, ENGL 352, and EDUC 302/EDUC 303. Before taking ENGL 359, students normally also complete EDUC 307 and EDUC 398.
  
  •  

    ENGL 360 - Creative Writing: Nonfiction

    (3)
    FA. A course in the principles and practice of creative nonfiction. Students will examine a variety of models and engage in extensive practice of the genre. Special emphasis will be given to the relationship between faith and art for the writer. Prerequisite: ENGL 101  or ENGL 102 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 361 - Creative Writing: Poetry

    (3)
    A course in the principles and composition of poetry. Students will engage in extensive practice. Special emphasis will be given to the relationship between faith and art for the writer.   Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 102.
  
  •  

    ENGL 362 - Creative Writing: Fiction

    (3)
    FA, SP. A course in the principles and composition of fiction. Students will engage in extensive practice. Special emphasis will be given to the relationship between faith and art for the writer. 
  
  •  

    ENGL 364 - Special Topics in Creative Writing

    (3)
    A focused study of creative writing in a particular subgenre or topic area. English 101 or English 102.
  
  •  

    ENGL 368 - Writing for Children and Young Adults

    (3)
    A course in the principles and composition of writing for children and young adults. Students will engage in extensive practice. Special emphasis will be given to the relationship between faith and art for the writer. English 101 or English 102.
  
  •  

    ENGL 371 - History of the English Language

    (3)
    SP. An analysis of the changes that have occurred throughout the history of the English language, based on an intensive study of selected British and American texts.
  
  •  

    ENGL 372 - Sociolinguistics and Issues in Language Education

    (3)
    FA. A course involving two major activities: (1) an examination of selected topics that have arisen in recent sociolinguistic research, particularly those topics centering on questions about how standard and nonstandard languages and dialects appear to affect people’s educational success; and (2) an evaluation of how these topics should affect approaches to language education, particularly approaches to teaching English as a Second Language (ESL). Prerequisite: ENGL 101  or ENGL 102 .
  
  •  

    ENGL 373 - Stylistics and Discourse Analysis

    (3)
    SP. A course that reviews significant grammatical terms; analyzes how words can be combined into longer constructions in English; examines the kinds of meanings–such as agency, modality, and solidarity–that those constructions can convey; and discusses how patterns of clauses conveying these various kinds of meaning within texts can be related to textual contexts.
  
  •  

    ENGL 376 - Semantics

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. The course introduces basic issues and concepts in the linguistic study of word meaning, as well as the relationship between the semantics of words and other aspects of meaning, such as propositional meaning and pragmatic meaning. Students will identify the role of word meaning in the overall system of meaning in natural language.
  
  •  

    ENGL 380 - Internship

    (3)
    FA, SP. A course requiring students to work ten hours per week in a job related to English studies. This practicum asks students to reflect on vocation broadly and to apply theoretical, technical, and ethical principles to their work. Students will work with the Career Center to secure a suitable position. Prerequisites: junior or senior status, a 2.0 university and departmental GPA, and permission of advisor.
  
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    ENGL 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
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    ENGL 390 - Independent Study

    (3)
    FA, SP. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair.
  
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    ENGL 395 - Senior Seminar

    (3)
    FA, SP. A capstone course for all English majors. This senior seminar is designed to nurture Christian reflection on issues related to writing, language, and literary studies, such as the significance of story and literary expression, the relationship of language and meaning, and the ethical implications of language and story. Students also consider vocational opportunities for those who love words. These contemporary literary and linguistic issues are framed by readings from within the tradition of Christian aesthetic reflection as well as from reformed cultural criticism and theology. Significant written work is required. Prerequisites: Biblical Foundations I or Theological Foundations I, Developing a Christian Mind, and Philosophical Foundations.
  
  •  

    ENGL 399 - Honors Thesis

    (3)
    FA. A substantial work of research and criticism in the field of language or literature or a significant creative project (with an additional critical component), required for those graduating with honors in English.

Education

  
  •  

    EDUC 102 - Introduction to Education

    (1)
    FA, SP. This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of education and the teaching profession. As such, it provides the initial framework for subsequent education courses, introducing students to pedagogy and its empirical basis, to issues of curriculum and standards, and to the organization of schools in the United States and beyond. The course affords students the opportunity to relate theory to practice as a companion field experience is a required component of the course. This course must be satisfactorily completed as a condition of program admission.
  
  •  

    EDUC 202 - The Learner in the Educational Context: Development and Diversity

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course will help students develop insight into the development of the mind, identity, and perspective of all learners, including multiple domains of diversity and many alternate ways of being, doing, and seeing, including what is typically labeled as “exceptionality.” Students will explore and analyze psychological, physical, social, culture and moral/spiritual facets of development as well as their interplay with the social environment of the learner and their impacts in the classroom. Through lectures, readings, class assignments, a service-learning experience, and a case study, the class will examine psychological, educational, biological, and socio-cultural theory through the lens of a reformed Christian perspective. There is a fifteen hour outside of class field placement required as part of this course. This course must be satisfactorily completed as a condition of program admission. Prerequisite: completion of EDUC 102.
  
  •  

    EDUC 210 - Music and Art in the Elementary Classroom

    (3)
    FA, SP. This is a required course for the elementary teacher candidate. It covers seven weeks of music education methods and seven weeks of visual arts methods. Integration of music and art with other subject areas will be stressed. Prerequisite: EDUC 102 or concurrent enrollment in EDUC 102.
  
  •  

    EDUC 236 - The Young Child in an Educational Setting

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course covers the basic theories of child development and developmental milestones. Students learn observational research techniques, observe children from birth – 2nd grade, and practice writing developmental assessment reports.
  
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    EDUC 238 - Developmentally Appropriate Practice with Young Children

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. Work with young children requires specialized knowledge of the field of early childhood education. Education 238 will equip students with knowledge and skills for developmentally appropriate practice for young children. This course includes anti-bias perspectives, pedagogical strategies including the importance of play in learning, classroom management, the use of technology with young children and reflection on practice. A one hr. practicum during the P-12 school day will be included.
  
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    EDUC 302 - Curriculum and Instruction for Diverse Learners

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course will help students develop an increased understanding of the complex issues surrounding learning theory and its impact on instruction in diverse educational contexts. Students will explore how an understanding of the learner, the curriculum, and the context shape instructional practice. They will learn how to engage in a pedagogical cycle that includes planning, implementation, evaluation, and reflection with a focus on meeting the needs of all learners. Students will also explore ways in which new teachers can develop and maintain a transformative vision. All of these areas will be examined through the lens of a reformed Christian perspective. An extensive practicum will assist students in linking theory and practice in a classroom setting. Prerequisites:EDUC 102, EDUC 202, admission to the teacher education program. (See Education Department website for admission requirements.) Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 303.
  
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    EDUC 303 - Curriculum and Instruction: Practicum

    (3)
    FA, SP. Must be taken concurrently with EDUC 302.
  
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    EDUC 305 - Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary and Middle School

    (2)
    FA, SP. A study of perspectives, content, methods, and materials in teaching the social studies in the elementary school. Students will analyze perspectives and determine major goals and themes for teaching the social studies. They will study and analyze the contributions of the various disciplines to the social studies curriculum. Students will examine materials and learn and practice methods for teaching the social studies. Biblical principles, which offer direction for human interactions in society, will be considered. Prerequisites: EDUC 302  /EDUC 303   or permission of the instructor. May also be taken concurrently with EDUC 302-303. 
  
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    EDUC 306 - Introduction to Cognitive Impairment

    (3)
    FA. A comprehensive study of the characteristics of persons who have an intellectual disability. Historical and contemporary perspectives on intellectual disability will be explored, as will common causes, definitional issues, and interventions. While special attention is given to the needs of persons with intellectual disabilities as learners, the course examines the entire lifespan and functioning in a variety of settings besides the school, such as the church, workplace, and neighborhood. A Christian view of persons, community, and discipleship, along with the concept of normalization/social role valorization, are integrating elements in the course. Prerequisite: EDUC 202 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    EDUC 307 - Reading/Literacy in the Content Area

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course examines the nature and function of literacy in the secondary curriculum. Specifically, this course will examine the reading and writing practices that support the ways of knowing and doing characteristic of secondary school subject areas. The course will include: analysis of the factors which affect comprehension and composition of content area materials, examining pedagogical strategies that support diagnosis as well as instruction in the literacy skills common to all content areas, strategies for supporting full participation and inclusion of students who display the wide range of ability found in the average secondary classroom, exploring the relationship between discipline based inquiry, literacy development, and educational goals and practices. There is a field placement component as part of this class that is outside the normal class meeting time, during the local secondary school days. Prerequisites: EDUC 302  /EDUC 303   or permission of the department chair. May also be taken concurrently with EDUC 302/303.
  
  •  

    EDUC 309 - Teaching Religion to Children and Adolescents

    (2)
    FA, SP. A study of perspectives, content, methods, and materials in teaching religion to children and adolescents. This includes pedagogy appropriate for public and non-public schools and other settings and evaluation of methods and materials. Prerequisites: EDUC 302  /EDUC 303  , permission of the instructor or declaration of ministry leadership minor. May also be taking concurrently with EDUC 302/303.
  
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    EDUC 310 - Assessment in Cognitive Impairment

    (3)
    SP. A study of the foundational concepts and basic terminology needed to assess students with intellectual disability. Skill will be developed in selecting, administering, and interpreting both formal and in-formal, norm-referenced as well as criterion referenced and curriculum-based assessment instruments, for the purpose of developing individualized educational plans. Corequisite: EDUC 347.
 

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