2021-2022 Catalog 
    
    Dec 01, 2022  
2021-2022 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Education

  
  •  

    EDUC 312 - Teaching Exceptional Students

    (3)
    SP. This course provides in-depth study of the characteristics of students who are labeled in school as having a disability and who may require a variety of learning supports. It includes study of laws and court decisions, the history of special education, alternative educational arrangements, individualized planning, current issues, and new pedagogical directions in serving exceptional learners in public and private schools. Throughout, a Christian view of persons will be developed that counteracts deficit thinking, recognizes the value and gifts of those who may have been given labels, sees human difference as asset, and fosters interdependence. Twelve hours will be spent outside of class during the K-12 school day in observation and critique of school programs that support learners with disabilities.
  
  •  

    EDUC 322 - Introduction to Methods of Teaching Reading: Elementary

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of reading theory and reading research, the nature of early reading acquisition, and instructional strategies in language arts for K-8. The teacher candidates are involved in extensive tutoring and interactions in the school that help them understand how children’s cultural and cognitive development influence their learning and how reading and writing are foundational to all learning. Prerequisites: EDUC 302-EDUC 303​ . May also be taken concurrently with EDUC 302-303.
  
  •  

    EDUC 326 - Reading/Language Arts in the Elementary School

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course will present reading as a language art and demonstrate the relationship of language arts to the various subjects in the elementary school. Students will learn strategies and techniques for assessing and differentiating instruction to meet the wide range of reading and writing levels found in elementary classrooms. Prerequisite: EDUC 322 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    EDUC 330 - Curriculum and Instruction: Cognitive Impairment

    (4)
    FA. A study of the various curricula, instructional materials, and teaching methods appropriate for learners who have mental impairments. Research-based general principles of instruction are reviewed as well as specific methods for teaching domestic, vocational, community living, recreation/leisure, and functional academic skills. Strategies are learned for generating curriculum, evaluating published curricula, and for developing individualized education programs. Includes a practicum of two half-days per week in local school programs serving students with cognitive impairment. Prerequisites: EDUC 202  , EDUC 302   /EDUC 303  , and EDUC 306   or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EDUC 302/303. 
  
  •  

    EDUC 335 - Assessment of the Young Child

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course prepares the early childhood professional to recognize and thoughtfully create and administer developmentally appropriate assessment strategies. Informal and formal assessment strategies including standardized assessments will be regarded. Students will observe and participate in developmentally appropriate assessment in early childhood classrooms. Other topics include assessment recording and reporting, referrals to community agencies using assessment data for curricular planning, and advocacy for practice that does not harm children. Prerequisites: EDUC 236 , EDUC 238 , and EDUC 302 /303 , or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EDUC 302/303.
  
  •  

    EDUC 337 - Curriculum Theory and Development: Early Childhood Education

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. An evaluation of the major approaches to development of a curriculum for early childhood education (up to age eight), the underlying assumptions of each approach, and the appropriateness of each approach for children. Included is a model for curriculum development and opportunity to implement the model for early education. Prerequisites: EDUC 236 , EDUC 238 , and EDUC 302 /303 , or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EDUC 302/303.
  
  •  

    EDUC 339 - The Early Childhood Professional

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course examines the knowledge and skills required to become an educator who identifies as a Christian early childhood professional, who can administer programs, who understands and works with children and families from diverse backgrounds, who can recognize and report child abuse and neglect, who is a strong advocate for children and families and who is a reflective practitioner committed to life-long learning. Prerequisites: EDUC 236 , EDUC 238 , and EDUC 302 /303 , or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EDUC 302/303.
  
  •  

    EDUC 343 - Early Childhood Education: Preschool Field Experience

    (4)
    FA. A field experience in a preschool setting that meets state requirements for the endorsement. Provides for analysis of teaching methods, materials, and classroom organization as they relate to the early childhood setting. Prerequisites: EDUC 236, EDUC 337, EDUC 339, and SOC 201 .
  
  •  

    EDUC 345 - Student Teaching: Elementary

    (12)
    FA, SP. Students participate in a supervised full-time teaching internship in a K – 8th grade classroom. Local and out of region placements are arranged by program faculty; out of region placements carry additional application requirements.  All internships include a weekly seminar.  Prerequisites: GPA of 2.5, completion of education courses, and appropriate recommendations from the education and major/minor departments. See the Education Program website for additional requirements.
  
  •  

    EDUC 346 - Directed Teaching: Secondary

    (12)
    FA, SP. Students participate in a full-time supervised student teaching experience in their major. Secondary mathematics, physical education, and science students (all of the sciences) student teach only during the fall semester. All other secondary students student teach during the spring semester. Prerequisites: GPA of 2.5, completion of education courses, appropriate recommendations from the education and major/minor departments, and concurrent enrollment in a departmental 359 Seminar. See the Education Department website for additional requirements.
  
  •  

    EDUC 347 - Directed Teaching: Cognitive Impairment

    (12)
    SP. Full-time, supervised student teaching in a school program serving students with mild or moderate levels of cognitive impairment. A minimum of ten weeks, including at least 360 clock hours of observation and participation, is required. Includes a biweekly seminar, which engages students in critical reflection on their experience in applying theory to practice in the student teaching context. Prerequisites: Good standing in the teacher education program, completion of all required education courses, and appropriate recommendations. See the Education Department website for additional requirements.
  
  •  

    EDUC 380 - Internship in Education and Disability Studies

    (0-4)
    SP. An internship is required of students seeking the major in Special Education Studies. This course requires students to work approximately ten hours per week in a position related to schooling and/or the support of individuals who have identified disabilities. Taken as part of the Special Education Studies major (or optionally with the minor) the internship will provide students an opportunity to consolidate their study of disability and program supports provided to individuals with identified disabilities. Students will work with Education Department faculty and the Career Center to secure a suitable position. Prerequisites: senior status, a 2.0 university and departmental GPA, and permission of the advisor and of the on-site advisor.
  
  •  

    EDUC 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  •  

    EDUC 390 - Independent Study

    (3)
    FA, SP. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair.
  
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    EDUC 398 - Integrative Seminar: Intellectual Foundations of Education

    (3)
    FA, SP. In this course students examine education in its context as a life practice. It involves inquiry into and critique of the philosophical assumptions, historical developments, and social settings that shape the beliefs and practices informing schools as social institutions and education as cultural practice. Throughout the course, students are completing their own faith-based philosophy of education. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, EDUC 302  and EDUC 303 , Biblical Foundations I or Theological Foundations I, Developing a Christian Mind, and Philosophical Foundations. May be taken concurrently with EDUC 302 and 303. 
  
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    EDUC 510 - Framing Questions, Global Forces, Constraining Structures

    (3)
    online. This course will center on fundamental questions at the intersection of education, justice, and human flourishing. We will examine key issues surrounding the nature of a good society, the ways in which the global community affects education, and how schooling gets structured by politics and economics. This course will use the faith-based frames of justice and hope in connection with shalom and the kingdom of God to investigate formal education in light of its political, economic, social, and religious contexts. Students will investigate foundational questions around teaching, learning, curriculum, and language as well as structural issues of social class, gender, ability, and race. The aim is for students to articulate their own idea of the purpose of school framed in their own faith-based perspective. The course will leave space for students to explore specific interests and issues.
  
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    EDUC 514 - Educational Research and Evaluation

    (3)
    online. This course engages students in understanding and examining the theories, methods, and paradigmatic frames of educational research through a biblical lens. In addition, the course prepares students to use data appropriately to support educational and organizational decision-making. Students will learn how to read and critique qualitative and quantitative educational research and will learn how to use research and assessment data to make decisions related to the work of P-12 schools.
  
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    EDUC 516 - Leading Educational Communities: Communication

    (3)
    online. Because communication is at the heart of teaching, learning and leading, the Graduate Studies Program prepares professional educators to understand and analyze discourse as it shapes educational activity. Teaching and learning communications are shaped and made meaningful by culture, language, mode and circumstance; as well as ideology and power. Abilities to analyze communication as discursive, prepares participants to examine educational activity settings, assess them for equitable participation and design them for more effective and just educational practice.
  
  •  

    EDUC 522 - Reshaping Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning

    (3)
    online. The dynamic relationship between curriculum as content and as process, between what is to be learned and the instructional practices used to organize and mediate it for students, is at the heart of educational practice. This course focuses on the theory and practice of curriculum and pedagogy, examined in terms of both the perspectives that shape them and the ways in which they serve or fail to serve all learners. Issues addressed include the concept, purpose, and social context of curriculum; the historical perspectives that influence current and future directions; the relationship between curriculum and instruction; and the connection between perspectival commitments, curriculum, and instruction. The course will also address issues and practices related to assessment and instructional technology. Readings, discussions, interaction with practitioners, investigation, and application will form important activities in the development of an understanding of and personal perspective on curriculum and instruction.
  
  •  

    EDUC 530 - Introduction to School Leadership

    (3)
    A study of leadership theory and practice relating to building school communities that promote learning for all students. This introductory course in school leadership will focus on: organizational and leadership theory, establishing a school mission, collaborative problem-solving and community building, decision-making skills and procedures, and personal leadership qualities. Special emphasis will be given to exploring biblical principles which guide Christian leaders in school settings.
  
  •  

    EDUC 531 - Professional Development and Supervision

    (3)
    A study of the theory and practice related to the professional development of teachers and administrators at both the elementary and secondary levels. This course focuses on ways in which school leaders can structure professional development opportunities that promote student learning and school improvement. The course includes a study of adult learning theory, collaborative learning models, mentoring and coaching, formal and informal teacher assessment, and recruitment, induction, and retention of new teachers. Special emphasis will be given to biblical principles which help shape professional communities in schools.
  
  •  

    EDUC 532 - School Business Management

    (3)
    online. In this course students will study principles and methods of planning and fiscal management that are based on a biblical model of stewardship. Topics include the process of funding (fund raising, tuition and fees), budgeting (including risk management), and organization. Prerequisites: EDUC 530 or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    EDUC 542 - Reading Assessment and Responsive Instruction

    (3)
    online. This course meets the state literacy course requirements for professional certification. It is required as part of the Calvin graduate reading specialist endorsement and can be used as an elective in any of the other Calvin MEd programs. In this course, we consider the developmental, socio-cultural and cognitive aspects of literacy teaching with students of all ages. We review literacy practices including fiction, information and discipline specific texts, special interest reading, and work place literacy. The course presents and critiques current positions from which literacy instruction is designed and delivered. It develops participants’ pedagogy as they learn to assess a reader’s abilities and develop instructional responses. Participants enhance their own critical literacy abilities as readers and writers of text. Course participants undertake a case study to complement the course readings, discussion and other learning. Course objectives are met through a deep engagement with a student who has been identified as an “at risk” reader based on classroom performance, ELL status or special education. This authentic engagement, facilitated by professional observations, assessments, and a responsive intervention, fully complements and activates course objectives.
  
  •  

    EDUC 544 - The Early Literacy Learner, At Home and in School

    (3)
    online. This course examines the social practices and cognitive development by which children progress towards independent abilities to participate in reading activity. Course participants identify young learner’s diverse social-cultural memberships, language abilities and the environmentally influenced experiences that children bring to school. Participants explore the concepts and abilities necessary to the development of new literacy learners. Using research, theory and experience, participants explore, analyze, and practice classroom pedagogies that best nourish each literacy learner’s foundation towards independent abilities for reading and writing.
  
  •  

    EDUC 545 - Literacy Learning after the Early Years: Middle School Children, Adolescents and Adults

    (3)
    online. This course supports educator’s literacy development of middle school students, adolescents and adult literacy learners. Instructional emphases shift from the earlier years. Older literacy learners engage wide-ranging text forms and specialized vocabulary needs. Their school learning and work lives depend on abilities to interact purposefully and knowledgeably with print, digital or electronic texts. Increasingly self-directed, older learners need reading abilities to select apt comprehension strategies; respond critically to a reading; determine the applications of a text to other experience or situations; as well as determine objectives in their production of texts. Course participants: classroom teachers, coaches, resource room educators, community programmers, and adult literacy instructors, develop their professional knowledge and pedagogies to assist viewers and readers become more critical and discriminating readers and producers of texts.
  
  •  

    EDUC 554 - Pathways to Inclusion: Re-examining Beliefs about Learners

    (3)
    online. Schools and classrooms today reflect an amazing diversity of learners. In any learning community, educators must be prepared to create a learning community that meets the needs of students with a variety of differences in ability, gender, sexuality, race/ethnicity, language, socioeconomic status, and more. Yet the reality of developing just and inclusive educational communities is challenging. Through this course, participants are invited to embark on pathways to inclusion by examining the needs of learners with differences in school contexts. Participants will re-examine commonly held beliefs and practices about identity and difference with the goal of developing inclusive learning communities. Readings and discussions will create opportunities that allow participants to consider how cognitive, socio-cultural, and critical perspectives are tools for thinking about shifting understandings of learners’ differences. Learning excursions and projects will become spaces for integrating and applying new understandings about ourselves and others within teaching/learning practice. The course will specifically focus on linguistic differences, language development, and literacy as they support or impede the inclusion of all learners in educational contexts.
  
  •  

    EDUC 555 - Designing Instruction for Successful Learning

    (3)
    online. This course will explore critical strategies for successful inclusive teaching practices that support all learners. Participants will refine their understanding of culturally responsive educational design as they develop complex student learning profiles, research accessible curricular programs and prepare teaching plans for successful learning. Data from individual student assessment will form the basis on which profiles are developed and plans are designed. Course foci will include reading and interpreting assessment data, developing learning profiles that reflect patterns of strengths and weaknesses, preparing or interpreting intervention-specific IEPs, and designing student-centered, evidence-based instructional plans.
  
  •  

    EDUC 556 - Perspectives, Programs, & Policies: Developing Inclusive Schools

    (3)
    online. How do educators develop and sustain a culturally responsive and inclusive school culture? What is a vision of Christ-centered educational programs and services where all students flourish? Educators in this course will trace the historical, ethical, political, religious, and research literature on policies, programs and practices of inclusive school communities. Through literature, policy, and field case analysis, they will learn about societal and community perspectives and develop skills and dispositions related to program development, implementation, and evaluation that advocate for and respond to all learners and their stakeholders.
  
  •  

    EDUC 557 - Practicum Seminar: Inclusion Specialist

    (3)
    online. The seminar supports the culminating practicum experience in the Inclusion Specialist Concentration. Students will work in a community of practice to explore the complexity of teaching and leadership to promote a culturally responsive and inclusive culture at multiple levels within a school system. At the heart of the seminar is an action research project carried out in the practicum placement. Students will design, implement, and evaluate inclusive practices, policies, or programs. They will also develop a plan for consultation with teachers and schools to increase culturally responsive inclusive practices, policies, or programs. The seminar will focus on bridging theory, research, and practice to promote culturally responsive inclusive education. The seminar must be taken concurrently with the Inclusion Specialist practicum.
  
  •  

    EDUC 558 - Practicum Field Placement: IS

    (2)
    online. The practicum provides a culminating experience in the Inclusion Specialist Program. Students may tailor the practicum experience to focus on Inclusive Classroom Practices or Inclusive School Programs. The practicum provides a culminating experience in which candidates will work closely with a mentor in an inclusive school setting for 140 hours (a minimum of 180 if you have had no special education experience). Inclusive Classroom Practices: Through the culminating practicum experience, students will gain experience designing and implementing culturally responsive curriculum, instruction, and assessment. The practicum will focus on bridging theory, research, and practice with an emphasis on teaching in inclusive classrooms and schools. Inclusive School Programs: Through the culminating practicum experience, students will examine and apply theory and best practices in leadership, organization, consulting, and the evaluation and development of programs and professionals. The practicum will focus on bridging theory, research, and practice with an emphasis on leadership in inclusive education. The practicum must be taken concurrently with the Inclusion Specialist seminar.
  
  •  

    EDUC 593 - Seminar: Educational Leadership

    (3)
    The graduate seminar and internship is designed to integrate the components of the Educational Leadership MEd concentration. The internship allows prospective school leaders to work closely with a mentor in a school setting over a period of 10 weeks during the school year. The seminar will focus on integrating the broad unifying themes of the concentration and the internship experiences. Students will reflect on how their education and professional experiences can be used for personal growth and to influence society. The seminar and internship will include a final educational portfolio. Prerequisites: All other courses in the MEd leadership concentration and permission of the educational leadership advisor.
  
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    EDUC 596 - Specialized Literature Survey

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to deepen their understanding of their chosen area of study and to specialize their focus through an extended program of reading guided by an instructor. Students will negotiate with their instructor a program of 2000 pages of reading (or equivalent) in their chosen area and evidence engagement with this literature through written and oral reports.
  
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    IDIS 205 - Societal Structures and Education

    (3)
    FA, SP. An examination of the interaction between education and the other systems and institutions (e.g., political, economic, and cultural) that shape society. This course will examine how education is shaped by and is reshaping these systems and institutions. Particular attention will be given to the impact of race, class, and gender on schooling and society. Community-based research projects will challenge students to examine these issues in real-life contexts as well as introducing them to social science research methodology. Christian norms, such as social justice, will shape this critical analysis of the interaction between education and society. This class is appropriate for all students who are interested in education and society.

Entrepreneurship: Undergraduate

  
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    ENTR 201 - Entrepreneurship

    (3)
    FA. Provides hands-on learning on how to launch a startup organization through the rapid development and testing of ideas by gathering customer and marketplace feedback. Startups face uncertainty and high levels of risk. Students learn how to reduce both uncertainty and risk by engaging actual customers in search of their pain points and unmet needs. Only by doing so can the entrepreneur develop a proper solution and establish a suitable business model. The class utilizes a lean startup approach that provides the steps needed to build a successful startup. Students may work on for-profit, non-profit, and/or social ventures. Entrepreneurship minors are expected to take this course in their first or second year and early in the sequence of courses for the minor.
  
  •  

    ENTR 202 - Small Business

    (3)
    SP. An integrated study of the business management principles applicable to the challenges and opportunities unique to small business. Emphasizes strategic analysis of management, marketing and financial issues facing small firms primarily from an entrepreneurial perspective. Includes lectures, case studies, and development of a comprehensive business plan. Prerequisite: ACCT 203  
  
  •  

    ENTR 301 - Social Entrepreneurship

    (3)
    SP. Social entrepreneurship is about bringing constructive changes to social and environmental problem areas. Social entrepreneurs develop social enterprises, organizations that marshal resources and people to make changes that set the world on a more positive course. These can be either for-profit or not-for-profit organizations, but their primary missions are to address social or environmental needs in powerful and sustainable ways. Students build on ideas and tools learned in ENTR 201 and other curricular and co-curricular (e.g., pitch competitions) work to develop business model solutions that meet customer needs, address specific social or environmental issues, and follow an asset-based approach to development. Prerequisites: at least 15 credits in the entrepreneurship minor, including ENTR 201 .
  
  •  

    ENTR 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.   Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  •  

    ENTR 391 - Ethnography

    (3)
    FA. This course introduces students to a sociological perspective on everyday social settings by applying methods of systematic, qualitative observation. Training includes ethnographic research methodologies designed to equip students to collect and analyze data. Topics include issues of access, rapport, participant observation, field notes, ethics, interviewing, coding, and analysis. This course is cross-listed as SOC 265 ; students wishing to take ethnography for credit in a sociology degree will need to enroll in SOC 265 . Prerequisite: ENTR 201 .

Environmental Studies

  
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    ENST 210 - Human Impacts on the Environment

    (3)
    FA, SP. As population and affluence have increased and technology’s role has grown, human activities have transformed natural environments around the globe. This course surveys and examines how a wide variety of human enterprises such as agriculture, industry, recreation, and urbanization have had and continue to have far-reaching environmental consequences everywhere on Earth. These impacts are assessed by standards such as ecological well-being and sustainability, human habitability, and quality of life.
  
  •  

    ENST 285 - Environmental Practicum

    (2)
    FA, SP. This course examines the job market and graduate programs in environmental sciences. Topics include exploring environmental careers as part of a broader Christian vocation as well as career options and necessary qualifications. Students conduct personal evaluations, prepare a resume, and set career goals. This course also pairs students with environmental programs/organizations, primarily at Calvin University, where they apply the concepts, principles, and skills they are learning as part of the environmental science or environmental studies major (e.g., the Ecosystem Preserve, Plaster Creek Stewards, or Coastal Cleanup). The course is pass/fail and is intended for students in their second year.
  
  •  

    ENST 302 - Environment and Society

    (3)
    FA. The interactions among population, resources, technology, economics, and public policy are studied in order to understand and address the environmental issues and problems of our day. Attention is focused upon energy, material, and food resource issues as well as upon population and resource relationships. Not open to first-year students. Prerequisite: ENST 210  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENST 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.   Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  •  

    ENST 385 - Internship in Environmental Studies

    (0-3)
    FA, SP, SU. This course is an internship involving field application of the concepts and principles learned as part of the environmental studies major or minor or the environmental science major. A student works as an intern under the direct supervision of an employee of a governmental agency, a not-for-profit organization, or a business, as well as under the supervision of the instructor. Interns must maintain an internship journal and complete a written report summarizing their internship experience. The credit hours vary with the number of hours worked. Prerequisites: ENST 210, ENST 302, and permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ENST 395 - History and Philosophy of Environmental Thought

    (3)
    SP. This course aims to develop a Christian philosophy of the environment and environmental management. Issues, problems, and controversies in environmental ethics are explored. Environmental thought is explored historically, through the perspectives of contemporary environmental movements, and finally from a Reformed, Christian perspective. This course fulfills the  Prerequisites: ENST 210  and ENST 302  or permission of the instructor.

Engineering

Prerequisite to all courses numbered 300 or higher is formal admission to a BSE concentration.

  
  •  

    ENGR 101 - Introduction to Engineering Design

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to the engineering design process and resource design tools by means of projects, lectures, homework, mentor visits, and team meetings. Team projects, including service learning, require application of creativity, engineering analysis, and computational tools. Readings, lectures, and discussions also examine the areas of technology in society, engineering ethics, and library research methods. Various computer software tools are introduced and used.
  
  •  

    ENGR 181 - Engineering Graphical Communication Lab

    (1)
    FA. This laboratory course focuses on techniques and computer software tools used for visualization and engineering communication. The course introduces graphical techniques for spatial analysis, including orthographic projection, free-hand sketching, pictorial representation, basic dimensioning, and 3-D modeling.
  
  •  

    ENGR 184 - Sustainability Challenges

    (1)
    FA. Sustainability involves meetings the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. This course examines the challenges to achieving sustainability in three arenas: economic, social, and environmental. Topics include global energy usage, personal carbon footprint, world population, and climate change. The trade-offs among biblical principles related to sustainability (stewardship, justice, and the cultural mandate) are examined.
  
  •  

    ENGR 202 - Statics and Dynamics

    (4)
    FA, SP. A study of fundamental principles of mechanics and their application to the problems of engineering. Vector algebra, forces, moments, couples, friction, virtual work, kinematics of a particle, kinematics of a rigid body, dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, impulse, momentum, work, and energy are presented in two and three dimensions. Prerequisites: PHYS 133 , MATH 172 .
  
  •  

    ENGR 204 - Circuits Analysis and Electronics

    (4)
    FA, SP. An introduction to the theory and application of electronic circuits and devices. The following topics are covered: basic linear circuits (including frequency and transient response), semiconductor devices (diodes, op-amps, comparators, etc.), electric power, electric safety, and DC machines. Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate the material covered in the lecture portion of the course. Students will measure voltage, current, resistance, power, transient response, resonant circuits, voltage regulators, operational amplifiers. Students will investigate digital logic circuits. Corequisite: PHYS 235 .
  
  •  

    ENGR 205 - Principles of Materials Science

    (3)
    SP. An introductory course in the science of engineering materials. Engineering properties of materials—mechanical, electrical, and chemical—are closely linked to the underlying solid state and molecular structure. Issues of stewardship and resources are addressed. Laboratory. Prerequisites: CHEM 101  and MATH 171 .
  
  •  

    ENGR 209 - Introduction to Conservation Laws and Fluid Mechanics

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course introduces several foundational engineering topics, including engineering problem-solving techniques, process data and calculations, single- and multi-component process material and energy balances (conservation laws), and fluid statics and dynamics. Issues of stewardship of materials and resources are addressed. Prerequisites: MATH 172 , either CHEM 101  or CHEM 103 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ENGR 220 - Introduction to Computer Architecture

    (4)
    FA. A study of computer organization (including memory hierarchy, I/O, bus-based systems, distributed systems, and parallel systems), and computer architecture (including CPU control, pipelining, and instruction set architecture). Laboratory exercises emphasize principles. Prerequisite: a programming-language course, normally CS 104  or CS 106  or CS 108 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ENGR 250 - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

    (3)
    SP. This course introduces students to the field of biomedical engineering, from the molecular and cellular level to the design and manufacturing of engineering systems used in healthcare. Topics include Biomolecular Principles, Cellular Principles, Respiration, Circulation, Biomechanics, Bioinstrumentation, Bioimaging, and Biomaterials. Content will also include discussion of biomedical engineering companies/products, government regulation, and new technologies. Prerequisite: A 200-level or higher ENGR course or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    ENGR 294 - Engineering Seminar

    (0)
    FA, SP. A seminar devoted to an exploration of topics in engineering. Seminars will cover areas such as the practice of engineering design, non-technical issues in engineering practice, engineering graduate studies, and aspects of engineering analysis. Students will receive transcript recognition for ENGR 294 if they attend eight (8) seminars before being admitted to a BSE concentration and will receive transcript recognition for ENGR 394 if they attend eight (8) seminars after being admitted to a BSE concentration. Plant tours and technical society meetings may be substituted for seminars upon approval.
  
  •  

    ENGR 295 - Internship Workshop

    (0)
    FA. A five session workshop intended to prepare freshman/sophomore level engineering students to successfully obtain a summer internship and to be a responsible employee. The workshop topics include: Calvin’s engineering internship program, finding an internship, writing a resume, interviewing, and on-the-job behavior. Completion of the workshop is a requirement for admission to a concentration in the engineering program.
  
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    ENGR 302 - Engineering Electromagnetics

    (4)
    SP. A study of the laws and engineering applications of electric and magnetic fields in various conductive, dielectric, and magnetic materials and under various boundary conditions. Emphasis is on the analysis and design aspects of transmission line circuits. Prerequisites: MATH 231  and PHYS 235 .
  
  •  

    ENGR 303 - Chemical Engineering Principles and Thermodynamics

    (3)
    FA. This course continues the study of chemical engineering principles begun in ENGR 209. Included are material and energy balances with reaction and introduction to vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibrium including the concepts of dew and bubble points and the flash process. Process simulators (UNISIM) are introduced. Principles are reinforced with an in-depth team design project of a commercial process. Basic concepts of thermodynamics, i.e., equilibrium, reversibility, system are presented. This material provides the foundation for the in-depth study of thermodynamics in ENGR 312. Laboratory Prerequisites: ENGR 209  and concurrent registration in CHEM 351 .
  
  •  

    ENGR 304 - Fundamentals of Digital Systems

    (4)
    SP. An introduction to the fundamental principles of logic design in digital systems. Topics include: Boolean algebra, analysis and synthesis of combinational and sequential networks, register transfer language, micro-operational description and applications to computer design, computer organization and assembly language programming, and asynchronous logic. The student is introduced to digital logic families and programmable logic devices, digital logic CAD tools, logic synthesis and hardware description languages (VHDL). Laboratory work will include logic design and assembly language programming. Prerequisites: ENGR 204  and a programming language course (normally CS 104  or CS 106  or CS 108 ).
  
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    ENGR 305 - Mechanics of Materials

    (4)
    FA. Application of principles of mechanics to the solution of problems in stress and strain of engineering materials, including resistance to force, bending, torque, shear, eccentric load, deflection of beams, buckling of columns, compounding of simple stresses, introduction to theory of failure, and energy methods. Prerequisites: ENGR 205  and ENGR 202 . Corequisite: MATH 231 .
  
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    ENGR 306 - Principles of Environmental Engineering

    (4)
    FA. A study of environmental engineering and science principles relevant to engineered and natural systems. Topics considered in this course include an overview of the domains of environmental engineering, relevant units of measurement, population dynamics, contaminant types, sources and presence, chemical stoichiometry, equilibria, and kinetics, mass and energy balances, mass/particle transport processes, microbial ecosystem structure and function, biogeochemical cycling, and oxygen demand. Prerequisite: ENGR 209  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGR 307 - Electrical Signals and Systems

    (4)
    FA. Advanced techniques for the analysis of analog electrical systems. Topics include: frequency domain analysis, Laplace transforms, Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and continuous versus discrete signal analysis. Frequency response is analyzed using transfer functions, Bode plots, and spectral plots. Digital Signal Processing (DSP) is introduced. Prerequisites: ENGR 204 , MATH 231 .
  
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    ENGR 308 - Environmental Engineering Design

    (4)
    SP. Application of environmental engineering and science principles to the design of environmental control measures and engineered systems. Problems considered in this course will include design of water supply and treatment processes, wastewater treatment processes, processes for air pollution control, groundwater remediation, and solid and hazardous waste management. Prerequisite: ENGR 306  or permission of the instructor.
  
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    ENGR 311 - Electronic Devices and Circuits

    (4)
    FA. A study of the characteristics and qualitative internal action of commonly used micro-electronic devices for discrete and integrated circuits, such as diodes, metal-oxide semi-conductors FETs (MOSFETS), and bipolar junction transistors (BJTs). Application of these devices in basic amplifier circuits is explored. Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate concepts. Prerequisites: ENGR 204  and MATH 231 .
  
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    ENGR 312 - Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

    (4)
    SP. Thermodynamic topics important in Chemical Engineering are addressed, including the properties of real fluids and equations of state, properties of mixtures, phase equilibrium, and chemical equilibrium. Prerequisites: ENGR 303  and CHEM 351 .
  
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    ENGR 314 - Vibration Analysis

    (4)
    SP. Analysis of mechanical vibration in both transient and steady state regimes is introduced, employing analytical and computer techniques for solution. Linear and non-linear problems are investigated with original inquiry suggested and encouraged. Prerequisites: ENGR 202  and MATH 231 .
  
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    ENGR 315 - Control Systems

    (4)
    FA. An introduction to linear feedback control theory, including transient and frequency response, stability, systems performance, control modes, and compensation methods. Hydraulic, electrical, pneumatic, and inertial components and systems are investigated and employed. Students will not normally receive credit for both this course and ENGR 342. Prerequisites: ENGR 204  and MATH 231 .
  
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    ENGR 318 - Soil Mechanics and Foundation Design

    (4)
    SP, alternate years. Soils studied as engineering materials whose behavior is dependent upon soil types, index properties, and soil moisture conditions. The scope of the course includes soil structures, index properties, soil classification, permeability, compressibility and consolidation, soil testing, soil stresses, and foundation design. Laboratory experiments are used to emphasize principles. Prerequisite: ENGR 305 .
  
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    ENGR 319 - Introduction to Thermal Sciences

    (4)
    FA. An introduction to the engineering thermal sciences including elements of thermodynamics and heat transfer. Thermodynamics concepts include state properties, the first and second laws, and common cycles. Heat transfer concepts include steady state and transient conduction, forced and natural convection, radiation, and heat exchangers. Laboratory and design exercises are used to illustrate concepts. Prerequisites: ENGR 202  and ENGR 209 , MATH 231 .
  
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    ENGR 320 - Hydraulic Engineering

    (4)
    FA. Application of the basic principles of fluid mechanics to practical problems in hydraulic and hydrologic analysis. Topics include fluid statics, hydrology, open channel flow, closed conduit flow, and centrifugal pumps. Computer techniques and laboratory exercises are used to emphasize principles. Prerequisite: ENGR 209 .
  
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    ENGR 321 - Hydraulic Engineering Design

    (4)
    SP. Application of principles of hydraulics and hydrology to the design of hydraulic systems. Problems considered in this course will include design of pipe networks for water distribution, design of sewage collection systems, design of pumping facilities, design of groundwater remediation systems, and design of flood control structures. Computer techniques will be frequently employed. Prerequisite: ENGR 320 .
  
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    ENGR 322 - Machine Design with Finite Element Analysis

    (4)
    SP. Application of engineering mechanics, materials, and failure theories to the analysis and design of mechanical elements and systems. Computer techniques are used as aids to analysis and design. Prerequisite: ENGR 305 .
  
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    ENGR 324 - Materials and Processes in Manufacturing

    (4)
    SP. This course introduces students to the various mechanical and management issues involved in the fabrication of manufactured goods. Scientific and engineering principles are applied to fabricating processes such as casting, forming, and machining so as to determine the relation of process to material properties, economics, dimensional accuracy, and energy requirements. Topics such as computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), numerical control (NC), statistical quality control (SQC), and quality management are also explored. Field trips and laboratories are used to support the lecture material. Prerequisites: ENGR 205  and ENGR 305 .
  
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    ENGR 325 - Computer Architecture and Digital Systems Design

    (4)
    FA. Design of advanced digital systems using programmable logic, Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), and microprocessors. Microprocessor architecture including pipelining, memory hierarchy, cache, instruction set architecture, CPU control, bus standards, I/O, superscalar, and Very Long Instructive Word (VLIW) approaches. Interfacing and communication techniques, including data error detection and correction codes. Introduction to parallel processing. Laboratory exercises emphasize the design of microprocessor-based digital systems. Prerequisite: ENGR 304 .
  
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    ENGR 326 - Structural Analysis

    (4)
    SP. A study of beams, two-dimensional trusses, and rigid frames. Course work includes calculation of shear forces and bending moments due to fixed and moving loads, calculation of deflection, analysis of moving loads using influence lines, and the analysis of statically indeterminate structures. The course also includes an introduction to matrix methods in structural analysis. Prerequisite: ENGR 305 .
  
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    ENGR 327 - Structural Design

    (4)
    FA. Application of principles of mechanics of solids and structural analysis to the design of structural members made of steel or reinforced concrete. Load and factored resistance design procedures are studied along with the current steel specification for the design, fabrication, and erection of structural steel for buildings and the building code requirements for reinforced concrete. Computer techniques are used as aids to analysis and design. Prerequisite: ENGR 181  and ENGR 326 .
  
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    ENGR 328 - Intermediate Thermal/Fluid Sciences and Design

    (4)
    SP. An intermediate treatment of heat transfer and thermodynamics including analysis and design related to steady and unsteady conduction with an emphasis on two and three dimensions, free and forced convection, radiation modes of heat transfer, power and refrigeration cycles, air conditioning processes, chemical equilibrium, and combustion. Laboratory, design, and computer exercises are utilized to emphasize principles. Prerequisite: ENGR 319 .
  
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    ENGR 330 - Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer

    (4)
    SP. Applications of fluid flow and heat transfer fundamentals to Chemical Engineering problems including heat exchanger design and designs for the transportation and metering of fluids. Unit operations of filtration and evaporation are covered. Prerequisites: ENGR 209  and ENGR 303 .
  
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    ENGR 331 - Kinetics/Reactor Design

    (4)
    FA. An introduction to chemical kinetics and reactor design. Principles of kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions with differential and integral analysis of kinetic data are included. Ideal reactor design concepts, non-isothermal reactor design, and design of catalyzed fluid-solid reactors are presented. Mass transfer, as it impacts multiphase reactor design, is introduced. One open-ended team design project and one kinetics lab project will be done to reinforce concepts presented in class. Prerequisites: ENGR 312 , ENGR 330 , and CHEM 351 .
  
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    ENGR 332 - Analog Circuits and Systems Design

    (4)
    SP. Feedback principles and electronic circuit theory and device theory applied to multistage transistor amplifiers. Detailed study of operational amplifier specs, non-idealities, and compensation. Introduction to filter theory and practical realizations. Power supply design: Rectifier circuits, linear, and switching regulators. Nonlinear circuits: Comparators, multipliers, Schmitt trigger, S/H circuits, multi-vibrators, and oscillators. Introduction to noise analysis and low noise design. Emphasis on realization of designs using commercially available IC’s. Design experience emphasized in projects and the laboratory. Prerequisites: ENGR 307  and ENGR 311 .
  
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    ENGR 333 - Thermal Systems Design

    (4)
    FA. Advanced heat transfer, thermodynamic, and fluid flow topics important for the design of thermal systems are presented. Sustainability and creation care topics are covered as they pertain to energy generation and fossil fuel resource depletion. Availability (exergy) analysis and methods for the optimization of system components are discussed. Selection and design of fluid flow and heat transfer equipment used in energy conversion systems are emphasized. Economic evaluation is studied. A co-generation system is studied throughout the semester to emphasize basic principles of analysis and design. A design project focused on sustainable energy generation or energy conservation is required. Prerequisite: ENGR 328 .
  
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    ENGR 334 - Dynamics of Machinery

    (3)
    SP. This course investigates various dynamic aspects of machinery. An in-depth study is made of mechanisms such as the four-bar linkage. Cams and gears are studied in the context of their use in machines. Vibration concerns are addressed including methods of balancing rotating machinery. Kinematics and kinetics are studied in a three-dimensional space with an emphasis on application in the area of robotics. Computer simulation of mechanisms is used to reinforce basic concepts. Prerequisite: ENGR 202 .
  
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    ENGR 335 - Mass Transfer and Staging Operations

    (4)
    FA. Mass transport fundamentals are applied to Chemical Engineering design problems. Principles of equilibrium mass transport operations are applied to distillation, gas absorption, extraction, and humidification design. Prerequisite: ENGR 312  and ENGR 330 .
  
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    ENGR 337 - Chemical Engineering Laboratory

    (2)
    SP. Principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, stage-operations, and chemical kinetics are studied using small-scale equipment. Evaluation and analysis of experimental observations, project proposals, and report writing is emphasized. Prerequisites: ENGR 331 , ENGR 335 , and CHEM 351 .
  
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    ENGR 338 - Introduction to Traffic Engineering and Highway Design

    (4)
    SP, alternate years. Introduction to the basic concepts of traffic engineering and highway design. The traffic-engineering portion introduces basic concepts including how the motorist, vehicle, road, and pedestrian interact, roadway capacity and Level-of-Service, traffic flow and queue theory, and traffic signal timing. Software applications are introduced regarding traffic simulation and capacity analysis. The highway design portion of the course focuses on the basics of horizontal and vertical alignment of roadways, design vehicle, design speed, superelevation, sight distance, and other design considerations. Prerequisite: admission to the Civil and Environmental Engineering concentration or permission of the Instructor.
  
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    ENGR 339 - Senior Design Project

    (2)
    FA. This is the first course in the senior design project sequence. Emphasis is placed on design team formation, project identification, and production of a feasibility study. Students focus on the development of task specifications in light of the norms for design and preliminary validation of the design by means of basic analysis and appropriate prototyping. Lectures focus on integration of the design process with a reformed Christian worldview, team building, and state-of-the-art technical aspects of design. Interdisciplinary projects are encouraged. Prerequisites: admission to an engineering concentration, Developing a Christian Mind, at least concurrent registration in PHIL 153  and REL 121 /REL 131  or permission of the instructors. This course (together with ENGR 340 ) fulfills the integrative studies core category.
  
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    ENGR 340 - Senior Design Project

    (4)
    SP. This is the second course in the senior design project sequence. Emphasis is placed on the completion of a major design project initiated in ENGR 339. This project should entail task specifications in light of the norms for design by means of engineering analysis and an appropriate prototype focused on primary functionality. A final presentation is given at the May senior design project program. Lectures continue to focus on integration of the design process with a reformed Christian worldview, team activity, and state-of-the-art technical aspects of design. Prerequisites: Admission to an engineering concentration, ENGR 339  (taken the semester immediately prior). This course (together with ENGR 339 ) fulfills the integrative studies core category.
  
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    ENGR 342 - Process Dynamics, Modeling, and Control

    (4)
    SP. Introduction to the analysis of process dynamics, and to the design and analysis of process control systems. Covers transient and frequency response, transfer functions, stability, performance, linearization, decoupling, and multivariable control. Students will not normally receive credit for both this course and ENGR 315. Prerequisites: ENGR 209  and MATH 231 .
  
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    ENGR 350 - Special Topics in Engineering

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course involves study of selected special topics of current interest in engineering. Topics vary by year and may be focused on interdisciplinary problem-solving or design, advanced theoretical or experimental analysis, and/or explorations of disciplinary breadth. Consult the department website for specific sections and topics that will be offered. This course may be repeated for credit if the title and associated content differs. Prerequisite: Varies by course section.
  
  •  

    ENGR 351 - Process Safety

    (1)
    FA. This course involves the study of chemical process safety as it is applied in the various process industries which include chemical, oil and gas, and pharmaceutical production. Topics to be covered include the following: toxicology, industrial hygiene, fire and explosion prevention, introduction to relief valves, and hazards identification assessment (HAZID). Case Studies will be used to illustrate process safety analysis and improvement methods. Prerequisites: ENGR 331 and ENGR 335, or departmental approval.
  
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    ENGR 382 - Engineering Instrumentation Laboratory

    (1)
    SP. Laboratory course, which serves as an introduction to the characteristics and uses of transducers to measure displacement, strain, pressure, temperature, velocity, acceleration, and other physical quantities. Emphasis is on the usefulness, accuracy, and reliability of measurement systems in actual applications. Electronic signal conditioning techniques are covered. A design project using LabVIEW software and FilePoint data acquisition hardware is required. Written reports required. Prerequisites: ENGR 204 .
  
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    ENGR 384 - Analysis of Sustainability Engineering Systems

    (1)
    SP. Sustainability engineering seeks to serve the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. This course analyzes the effectiveness of proposed sustainability engineering systems and methods to obtaining that goal in three arenas: economic, social, and environmental. It also discusses analysis approaches for sustainability. Topics include global energy usage, personal carbon footprint, world population, and climate change. The trade-offs among biblical principles related to sustainability (stewardship, justice, and the cultural mandate) are examined. Prerequisites: ENGR 184  and admission to an engineering concentration.
  
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    ENGR 385 - Engineering Internship

    (0-3)
    FA, SP, SU. Engineering students who complete engineering-related internship or research work may receive transcript credit for the experience. Completion of the internship course requires a minimum of 140 hours of experiential learning, consisting of engineering professional work or academic research that emphasizes application of the knowledge and skills gained in engineering coursework. Internship projects must be guided by engineering practitioners and will be evaluated by the engineering department internship coordinator. Students must submit an internship plan, reflect on the internship experience, submit a brief written report of their activities under the signature of their supervisor, and summarize their work in a poster presentation. Questions regarding the appropriateness of specific experiential learning activities for internship credit should be directed to the engineering internship coordinator. Prerequisite: Completion of at least one year (>30 semester hours) of engineering program coursework.
  
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    ENGR 387 - International Engineering Internship

    (0-3)
    Engineering students who complete engineering-related internship or research work in a country other than the United States or Canada may receive transcript credit for the experience. Completion of the international internship course requires a minimum of 140 hours of experiential learning, consisting of engineering professional work or academic research that emphasizes application of the knowledge and skills gained in engineering coursework. Internship projects must be guided by engineering practitioners and will be evaluated by the engineering department internship coordinator. Students must submit an internship plan, reflect on the internship experience, submit a brief written report of their activities under the signature of their supervisor, and summarize their work in a poster presentation. Questions regarding the appropriateness of specific experiential learning activities for international internship credit should be directed to the engineering internship coordinator. Prerequisite: Completion of at least one year (>30 semester hours) of engineering program coursework.
  
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    ENGR 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP. Independent readings and research. Prerequisite: permission of the chair.
  
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    ENGR 394 - Engineering Seminar

    (0)
    FA, SP. A seminar devoted to an exploration of topics in engineering. Seminars will cover areas such as the practice of engineering design, non-technical issues in engineering practice, engineering graduate studies, and aspects of engineering analysis. Students will receive transcript recognition for ENGR 294 if they attend eight (8) seminars before being admitted to a BSE concentration and will receive transcript recognition for ENGR 394 if they attend eight (8) seminars after being admitted to a BSE concentration. Plant tours and technical society meetings may be substituted for seminars upon approval.

Finance: Undergraduate

  
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    FIN 201 - Personal Finance

    (3)
    SP. Personal finance is a specialized area of study focusing on individual and household financial decisions: How much should I save? How much should I spend? How much should I give?…decisions that impact our future economic well-being. Financial planning is a process of setting financial goals and organizing assets and making decisions to achieve these goals, in an environment of risk. This class will consider financial goals for Christians and will provide information and techniques to help students be good stewards of what God entrusts to them. Topics covered will include: financial planning tools, goal setting and budgeting, tax planning, cash management, consumption and lifestyle choices, credit strategies, charitable giving, automobile and housing decisions, insurance needs, concepts of investing, estate planning and retirement planning. Class sessions will include lectures, presentations by various professionals in these disciplines, video, and group exercises and discussion.
  
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    FIN 301 - Corporate Finance

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of the principles and problems of the financial management of the firm, including such topics as stock and bond valuation, working capital management, cost of capital and capital budgeting, capital structure, and dividend policy. For entry into this 300-level finance course, students must have achieved at least a C in BUS 101, BUS 201, ACCT 203, and ACCT 204. Prerequisites: ACCT 204 ECON 221 STAT 143 , and DATA 175 .
  
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    FIN 302 - Investments

    (3)
    FA. An application of finance theory to investment instruments, including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, options, and futures as well as the related investment theory including risk, return, valuation and asset allocation. The course also examines the financial markets and institutions through which these instruments trade, including investment companies, funds, exchanges and clearing houses. Prerequisite: FIN 301 .
  
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    FIN 310 - Special Topics in Finance

    (3)
    SP. This course will cover special topics in finance which will allow students more advanced study in specific areas of interest. Topics could include mergers and acquisitions, derivatives, capital markets, pensions, insurance, corporate valuation, credit analysis, real estate, capital budgeting, international finance, structured products, private investing, risk management, corporate social responsibility, financial planning, estate planning, retirement planning, and insurance planning and employee benefits. The topics may differ from year to year; if so, the course can be taken more than once. Prerequisite: FIN 301 .
  
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    FIN 311 - Fundamentals of Financial Planning and Insurance

    (3)
    Students learn the fundamentals of financial planning, including the legal, ethical and regulatory environment. In addition, students engage the primary concepts of risk and insurance from the perspective of a financial advisory professional. The common types of risks and insurance of covered include health, life, disability, long-term care, and property and liability.  Throughout, students will develop a biblical perspective of financial planning, risk and insurance. For entry into this 300-level finance course, students must have achieved at least a C in BUS 101, BUS 201, ACCT 203, and ACCT 204. Not offered 2021-2022.
 

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