2021-2022 Catalog 
    
    Dec 01, 2022  
2021-2022 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Political Science

  
  •  

    POLS 218 - American Foreign Policy

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This is an analytical view of American foreign policy, including its domestic sources, the process of formulating policy, the instruments of American diplomacy, the nature of U.S. relations with hostile powers, allies, emerging powers, and the United Nations, and the limitations and potential of American foreign policy. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 228 - Global Politics of Human Rights

    (3)
    FA. This course examines the emergence and institutionalization of human rights in the international arena. It analyzes the idea of human rights and examines the place of this idea in particular areas of concern, such as race, gender, religion, and the meeting of basic material needs. It questions the assertion and defense of human rights, by examining issues such as genocide, displaced persons, humanitarian intervention, and the role of international organizations.
  
  •  

    POLS 234 - The President and Congress

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. The course analyzes the powers and processes of these two institutions of American government and the changing relationship between them.
  
  •  

    POLS 237 - Parties and Interest Groups

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. The course investigates the nature and importance of political parties and interest groups for American politics. Topics include party development, interest group mobilization, and party organization. In election years, students enrolled in the course are encouraged to participate in the political campaign of the party or candidate of their choice at the local, state or federal level.
  
  •  

    POLS 238 - American Elections and Mass Media

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. The course provides a survey of the relationship between American politics and the mass communications media. The course covers the way the federal government, through its regulations and its dissemination of information, affects the operations of the media, campaigning and elections, and how the media influence the social and political values of Americans and the functioning of the political system. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 240 - Freedom, Justice, and Political Authority

    (3)
    SP. This course provides an introduction to the history of political thought. By examining such concepts as freedom, authority, and justice, as they are understood by representative modern and pre-modern political thinkers, the course attempts to uncover the major strands of historical development in Western political thinking.
  
  •  

    POLS 242 - Philosophy, Politics, and Law

    (3)
    FA. An investigation of such topics as the nature and types of law, sources of law, the bases of a legal system, the nature of legal and political authority, and the status of civil and human rights. Some consideration will also be given to the complex role lawyers and judges play in our society and to some of the ethical issues they may face as a result of this complexity, as well as to the ways in which a Christian perspective might affect the decisions a lawyer, judge, or citizen makes about the law and legal practice. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 253 - Quantitative Research Methods

    (3)
    FA, SU. An introduction to the use of advanced statistics to investigate economic, political, and business questions. Emphasis on evaluating the quality of available information, developing theory-directed models, conducting original research, and interpreting and critically evaluating the published work of others. Topics include the classical linear regression model, time series, heteroskedastic and autocorrelated disturbance models, and selection models. Prerequisite: STAT 143  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    POLS 255 - Qualitative Research Methods

    (3)
    SP. This course introduces students to methods of systematic, qualitative observation used in the social sciences, equipping them to collect and analyze data. Students will be exposed to examples of ethnolgraphy, historical compartive analysis, typologies, path dependence, process tracing, necessary and sufficient logic, and fuzzy sets. Topics include participant observation, field notes, focus groups, ethics, interviewing, coding, and analysis.
  
  •  

    POLS 276 - Latin American Politics

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. The course examines the government and politics of Latin American states with special emphasis on historical patterns, democratic transitions, economic development, and human rights. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 277 - Asian Politics

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. The course examines the governments and politics of Asian states with special emphasis on historical patterns, democratic transitions, economic development, and human rights. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 279 - African Politics

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course examines the politics and governments of African states. It questions why some states make better progress towards the goals of stability, democratization and socioeconomic development than others. Specific issues examined are military rule, corruption, ethnic and religious strife, poverty, human rights, and public health.
  
  •  

    POLS 295 - Special Topics in Political Science

    (3)
    FA, SP. Content for this course varies. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    POLS 304 - International Peace and Security

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. The course examines the theory and practice of international peace and security since the end of the Cold War, causes of war and war termination, military strategy, WMD proliferation, nonproliferation and counterproliferation, security institutions, and international order. Recommended: POLS 207 .
  
  •  

    POLS 306 - Christian Political Thought

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course introduces students to the two-thousand year tradition of Christian political thought. Students will learn about the contributions of the early church figures, Reformed, Catholic, Anabaptist, and Orthodox thinkers and representatives of various contemporary Christian traditions. In developing their own approach to what faithful citizenship means, students will draw from classical Christian figures as well as more contemporary voices such as Martin Luther King Jr., Dorothy Day, and Reinhold Niebuhr.
  
  •  

    POLS 307 - Civil War, Ethnic Conflict, and Terrorism

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course addresses how states use domestic policies to manage intrastate and transnational conflict in different forms. Topics include the causes and consequences of domestic conflict and the ways that conflict is perpetuated through the domestic institutions of states. Special attention is paid to the way that conflict within states can spillover into regional conflict and the ways that states differently respond to the interference of other states and international institutions in their domestic affairs. Recommended: POLS 214 .
  
  •  

    POLS 309 - International Organizations and Law

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. The course examines international organizations and international law, including their function and processes, their limits and possibilities, and their relationship to the international system. Recommended: POLS 207 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 310 - American Constitutional Foundations

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. The course is a comprehensive study of the role of the courts in the American political system, focusing on the Supreme Court’s role in constitutional interpretation. Recommended: POLS 202 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    POLS 319 - International Political Economy

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course examines how competing political philosophies and ideologies explain different economic practices of states, how political forces and institutions affect the operation of international markets, and how global economic institutions operate. The course investigates the political controversies that surround the actions of central global economic institutions as well as the domestic political issues that result from international economic forces. Recommended: POLS 207 , POLS 309 , ECON 222 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 321 - Religion and Politics

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course examines religion as an agent of political mobilization and change across different cultural contexts in terms of its historical development, cultural manifestation, and its effects on the political system. Recommended: POLS 214 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 322 - Global Democratization

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course examines the factors that have contributed to and hindered the recent emergence of democratic governance in Southern Europe, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Russia, and Africa. Attention is given to the relationship among democracy, development, and political culture. Recommended: POLS 214 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    POLS 380 - Internship in Politics and Government

    (2-6)
    FA, SP, SU. An internship in politics and government combines practical experience and academic reflection. While internships are invaluable as a means of professional networking and career advancement, the primary objective of a credit-bearing internship is for students to make connections between the discipline of political science and their own vocational calling. Student-interns work in a variety of national, state, and local executive and legislative offices, governmental and non-governmental agencies, political campaigns, party and interest group organizations, think tanks, court-related agencies, international organizations, and law firms. Prerequisites: sophomore, junior, or senior status, appropriate course background in political science or related fields, and permission of the Calvin instructor.
  
  •  

    POLS 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Department of Politics and Economics and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Department of Politics and Economics. 

  
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    POLS 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP, SU. Reading or directed projects for majors. Open with the permission of the chair and the instructor under whom the work will be done.
  
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    POLS 399 - Research Seminar in Political Science

    (3)
    FA. A study of the worldview foundations of political ideologies, political science theories, and research methods. Emphasis is on reading and discussion of significant texts within both the discipline and Reformed thought. The second half of the course allows students to engage in a major research project applying social scientific methods to addressing a well-defined research question in political science. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, completion of biblical or theological foundations, philosophical foundations, POLS 251, and two additional courses in the department.

Politics, Philosophy, and Economics

  
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    IDIS 395 - Politics, Philosophy, and Economics Capstone

    (3)
    SP. An advanced, integrative seminar on select themes and concepts using classic and contemporary works in philosophy, political science, and economics, with special attention to Christian thought and faith integration. The course culminates in a significant research project and presentation. Crosslisted as ECON 395. Prerequisites: senior standing or permission of the PPE Committee, and completion of the common foundations and intermediate courses in the PPE curriculum map.
  
  •  

    PHIL 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Philosophy department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Philosophy department. 


Psychology

  
  •  

    PSYC 151 - Introductory Psychology: Perspectives on the Self

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. This course provides an introduction to psychology’s study of the biological, affective, cognitive, and social dimensions of human identity and behavior. It includes the consideration of such issues as perception and consciousness, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, personality development and social interaction, stress and adjustment. Students are introduced to the methods of psychological research and to the role of psychology in scientific endeavor and human application. Through assigned reading and writing as well as classroom discussion, students learn to critically weigh alternative claims regarding human behavior and to appreciate a holistic approach to the study of persons.
  
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    PSYC 201 - Developmental Psychology: Lifespan

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. An overview of human psychological development from birth to death. The primary objective is to understand the behavior characteristic of each stage of development and the factors which influence that behavior. Open to non-majors and Psychology majors in the pre-health professions, or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken or plan to take PSYC 208 or PSYC 209. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or EDUC 202, or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PSYC 202 - Youth Faith Development and Spiritual Formation

    (3)
    SP. This course examines how faith is formed and developed by studying influential theories of faith formation (e.g., Fowler’s stages of faith, Object-Relations) and the general developmental theories on which these faith formation theories are based. Approximately two weeks are devoted to faith formation in children. The remainder of the course focuses on the development of religious identity and practices during adolescence and early adulthood. Contextual influences examined include family, peers, schools, religious congregations, historical traditions, organized rites of passage, and post-modern culture. Religious identity is viewed as intertwined with gender and ethnic identity. Not open to students who have taken or intend to take PSYC 209. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or EDUC 202, or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    PSYC 212 - Psychopathology

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of the wide range of abnormal behaviors. Emphasis is on causes, dynamics, and classification, with some attention to treatment approaches. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    PSYC 220 - Psychological Perspectives on Marriage and the Family

    (3)
    SP. This course focuses on psychological theory, research, and perspectives on family life. The course examines historical and current conceptualizations of the family as well as cross-cultural and alternative conceptualizations. Psychological perspectives on marriage preparation, marriage, divorce, infertility, child rearing, and single parenthood, as well as developmental changes in the family are addressed. The course also focuses on family dysfunction, treatment, and health. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    PSYC 222 - Human Sexuality and Gender

    (3)
    SP. This course explores the ways that sexuality and gender have been studied as variables in psychological research and theory. Special attention will be given to recent theories of physiological and cultural influences on men’s and women’s development. Biblical and popular perspectives on sexuality and gender issues will be examined, and promises and problems in gender relations will also be studied. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    PSYC 255 - Statistics and Research Design

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course is an introduction to statistics and computer application in psychology. Concepts and procedures taught include levels of measurement, measures of central tendency, correlation techniques, probability theory, and hypothesis tests. Lab work includes the use of SPSS software. Psychology students typically take this course in their sophomore year. Prerequisites: An introductory course in one of the social sciences (e.g., PSYC 151) and meeting the Calvin admission requirement in mathematics.
  
  •  

    PSYC 256 - Fundamentals of Research and Practice

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course will provide hands-on, participatory research activities that build on the basic theories and applications of PSYC 255. Students will be conducting projects that allow the learning of fundamental practice skills in community or social science research, but also provide additional practice and theory building in statistics and basic research methods. Specific concepts will include basic perspectives in social science research, the fundamentals of measurement in social sciences, sampling techniques, survey design, application of statistical methods to real world situations, use of SPSS, ethical issues in research, and the critical evaluation of research methods and results. Prerequisites: An introductory course in one of the social sciences (e.g., PSYC 151 ) and PSYC 255 .
  
  •  

    PSYC 270 - Children at Risk

    (3)
    SP. This class focuses on social structures, life-experiences, and individual factors that put the developing child/teen at risk for developmental problems. Risk factors include poverty, ethnic minority status, abuse and neglect, orphanage experience, divorce and remarriage, immigration, sex-trafficking, and neurological disorders such as ADHD and Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Students spend one day per week in class and one day per week in a practicum placement (typically a low income preschool). Tag: Diversity and difference.
  
  •  

    PSYC 280 - The Helping Interview: Theory and Practice in Clinical Settings

    (2)
    This course focuses on psychological theory, research, and practice in regard to the helping interview. Emphasis is on historical and current conceptualizations of interviewing techniques and processes. Theory, issues, and techniques regarding the interview are applied to clinical settings. Prerequisite: PSYC 212 or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    PSYC 305 - The Psychology of Work

    (3)
    FA. A consideration of psychological concepts and research related to human action in work situations, particularly in organizations. The principles of industrial and organizational psychology and human resource management are applied to current topics including organizational identity, psychometrics for screening and selection, employee socialization, performance measurement and management, and employee attitudes and behaviors. The relationship of psychological theory and practice are analyzed through case studies of organizational experiences. Also listed as HRM 305. Prerequisites: BUS 201  or PSYC 151 , and STAT 143  or PSYC 255 .
  
  •  

    PSYC 306 - History and Systems of Psychology

    (3)
    This course explores the historical roots of some of the current directions and tensions in the field of psychology. Questions about human nature and the nature of mind and knowledge are addressed though the study of ancient, medieval and modern psychological theory. Prerequisites: two courses in psychology or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    PSYC 310 - Social Psychology

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Attention is given to such topics as persuasion and attitude change, conformity and obedience, group conflict and decision-making, stereotypes and illusions of social thought, attraction and prejudice, and altruism and aggression. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    PSYC 311 - Theories of Personality

    (3)
    FA. A study of the enduring human personality characteristics that often distinguish one person from another. Extensive consideration is given to biological, psychodynamic, social, cognitive, and trait-descriptive theories of personality structure and functioning. The course also introduces students to a variety of personality scales and inventories designed to identify important individual differences in personality. Prerequisites: PSYC 151 and PSYC 212 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    PSYC 312 - Clinical and Counseling Assessment

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to the theoretical and practical issues of psychological testing and measurement. Topics include: Test construction, reliability and validity of tests, evaluation of commonly used tests including measures of intelligence, personality, development, and emotion, exposure to measures used in multiple settings including neuropsychology, assessment in clinical and counseling psychology, school assessment, and industrial/organizational psychology, and the socio-cultural, educational, and legal issues involved in testing and measurement. Prerequisite: PSYC 255 or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    PSYC 314 - Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to counseling and psychotherapeutic methods for dealing with emotional disorders. The course includes an overview of major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy with an analysis of the theoretical aspects and techniques employed. An attempt is also made to integrate these various approaches and to view them from a Christian perspective. Prerequisites: PSYC 212 and PSYC 311 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    PSYC 322 - Perspectives in Psychology

    (2-4)
    This course explores the relationships of psychology to, or its involvement in, such areas as religion, literature, art, family, and culture. When offered, the particular topic area will be announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    PSYC 332 - Principles of Learning and Behavior Modifications

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to learning principles, derived from operant and classical conditioning, applied to changing human behavior in clinical settings and in everyday activities. Students will learn to use principles and procedures of behavior modification including reinforcement, extinction, punishment, stimulus control, discrimination, shaping, prompting, and chaining. In addition, students will learn research designs used in behavior modification including A-B, A-B-A-B, and multiple baseline designs. Students will also conduct a self-management project using various principles and procedures designed to modify their own behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or permission of the instructor. Recommended: junior or senior status. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  •  

    PSYC 334 - Cognitive Psychology

    (3)
    SP. A survey of research and theory in the study of human cognition. The course covers the acquisition, representation, and use of knowledge with emphasis on the processes of memory, language, and decision-making. Prerequisite: PSYC 151 or permission of the instructor. Recommended: junior or senior status.
  
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    PSYC 335 - Health Psychology

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course considers the psychosocial and physiological processes that underlie wellness. The role of stress in cardiovascular disease, cancer, drug addiction, sleep disorders and eating disorders is considered. The centrality of immune and cardiovascular system functioning in health and illness is emphasized. Attention is given to the effectiveness of a wide variety of coping strategies including pain control, physical exercise, and religious practice. Across topics, the course will emphasize current treatment procedures and research issues in the field. Laboratory experiences will permit students the opportunity to learn and practice skills associated with the health psychology profession and research. Prerequisites: PSYC 151 and one from BIOL 115 , BIOL 205 , BIOL 206 , BIOL 230 , BIOL 323 , or BIOL 331 , or permission of the instructor. Recommended: junior or senior status.
  
  •  

    PSYC 343 - Behavioral Neuroscience

    (3)
    SP. This course explores the rapidly expanding knowledge of genetics, bodily function, and brain function that is having a major impact on the way we understand behavior and the essence of our human nature. The course focuses on basic nerve cell function, neuroanatomy, and how “lower level” brain systems function in our everyday behavior. Specific topics include the relationship of brain function to basic visual and other sensory processes (e.g., hearing, touch, and pain), sleep, sexuality, basic motivations such as hunger and thirst, basic emotional functions, and basic memory and learning processes. The course also examines the biological basis for drug action and dependency, the biological basis for nervous system diseases (e.g., Parkinson’s disease), as well as the response of the nervous system to damage or disease. Finally, several class discussions and readings focus on our understanding of persons in light of current brain-behavior research. Prerequisites: PSYC 151  and biology core or permission of the instructor. Recommended: junior or senior status.
  
  •  

    PSYC 343L - Behavioral Neuroscience Lab

    (1)
    SP. This course is a lab course designed to strengthen knowledge of neuroscience information as well as the variety of research methods and tools used to explore brain function. Lab activities include brain dissection, electrophysiological measurements, emotional responses (i.e., skin conductance and heart rate), and brain activity (i.e., electroencephalography, or EEG). In addition, there will be presentations that provide an overview of many of the tools used to study neural tissue, neuroanatomy, and neural functioning that cannot be done through class activities. Finally, students will conduct a data-gathering project that will explore original questions in the field of neuroscience or neuropsychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 151 , and biology core or permission of instructor. Corequisite: PSYC 343 .
  
  •  

    PSYC 344 - Neuropsychology

    (3)
    FA. This course explores the rapidly expanding knowledge of “higher level” brain function and clinical applications of this knowledge. Specific topics include the relationship of higher cortical function to attention mechanisms, complex visual experience, amnesia syndromes, language and reading disorders, hemisphere specialization, decision making and “executive function,” problem solving, consciousness, anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and other bio-behavioral disorders (e.g., Tourette’s syndrome). Class discussions and readings also focus on our understanding of consciousness and personal responsibility in light of this research. The course includes an introduction to the work of clinical neuropsychologists and cognitive neuroscientists, as well as the latest in brain scanning technology by way of clinical case studies and possibly through off-campus experiences. There is no separate laboratory for this course. Prerequisites: PSYC 151  and biology core or permission of the instructor. Recommended: junior or senior status.
  
  •  

    PSYC 356 - Experimental Psychology

    (4)
    FA. This course explores experimental designs and the statistical techniques related to them. Students will have hands-on experience with experimental control techniques, factorial designs and interaction effects, and the use of the analysis of variance. In addition, students will design their own experimental research, implement their studies and analyze the resulting data. This course is a preparation for graduate-level research. Prerequisites: PSYC 255 and PSYC 256 and departmental approval of student application.
  
  •  

    PSYC 380 - Internship in Psychology

    (4)
    FA, SP, SU. Students are placed in a field experience related to a specialized area of psychological practice or research (e.g., school psychology, industrial-organizational psychology, or counseling-rehabilitation psychology). Students work eight hours per week under the direction of an on-site supervisor and participate in regular seminar meetings conducted by the university instructor. These experiences will introduce students to service in professional psychology, as it is related to issues of psychological theory, research, client characteristics and needs, professional standards, and Christian discipleship. Each student will author a project that communicates learning throughout the internship. Prerequisites: junior or senior psychology major, completion of course sequences related to the internship specialization (information available from the Psychology Department), and departmental approval of student application.
  
  •  

    PSYC 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Psychology department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Psychology department. 

  
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    PSYC 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair.
  
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    PSYC 399 - Psychology and Religion

    (3)
    FA, SP. This capstone course examines relationships between psychology and religion. It includes discussions of how several major psychologists have attempted to explain religious faith and practice. The course examines frameworks that have been proposed for relating Christian beliefs about persons and psychological explanations. Consideration is given to how these frameworks have influenced recent investigations of areas related to our experiences of Christian faith (e.g., perception, moral development, and emotion). Prerequisites: PSYC 151 and three additional psychology courses or permission of the instructor. See financial aid for a description of the Templeton Award.

Public Health

  
  •  

    PUBH 101 - Introduction to Public Health

    (3)
    FA. This course introduces students to the broad interdisciplinary field and history of public health in both the U.S. and globally. The course explores the social, political, and environmental determinants of health and disease, with special attention to how individual factors (such as education, occupation, race, and age) and structural factors (such as war, poverty, and health care systems) shape health outcomes. Students are introduced to both U.S. and global public health infrastructures that focus on improving and monitoring the public’s health. Several topical areas with priority interest to public health are considered such as maternal and child health, disaster management, terrorism, control of infectious disease, food production, and population growth. Students are also introduced to global health care institutions that develop, finance, and respond to global health care initiatives. Throughout the course, students are challenged to consider a variety of ethical issues integral to public health as they consider this field from a Christian perspective. Faculty employ multiple teaching methods including lecture, discussion, case studies, guest lectures, and field trips.
  
  •  

    PUBH 248 - Epidemiology

    (4)
    SP. Epidemiology is built upon the premise that poor health outcomes are not randomly distributed in a population. By comparing the sick or injured to the well we can begin to identify the underlying causes of disease and injury. This course provides an epidemiologic approach to the study of incidence, prevalence, and patterns of disease and injury in populations and the application of this study to the control of public health problems. Students will describe the study designs used in epidemiology, learn to calculate basic epidemiologic measures, identify threats to study validity, identify public health surveillance and screening programs, and learn to draw appropriate inferences from epidemiologic data and reports. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: PUBH 101 (or permission of instructor) and one from STAT 143 , PSYC 255 , or SOC 255 /SOWK 255 .
  
  •  

    PUBH 295 - Public Health Seminar

    (0)
    FA, SP. Various topics related to public health are presented by visiting speakers, faculty, students, video and simulcast seminar. Public health majors must register for at least two semesters of Public Health 295, ideally during their junior and senior year.
  
  •  

    PUBH 380 - Internship in Public Health

    (3, 4)
    FA, SP. This course links students to internship opportunities in public health settings where they are assigned specific public health-related responsibilities. Students work 10-12 hours (3 semester hours) or 13-15 (4 semester hours) per week under the supervision of approved agency supervisors and faculty coordinators. Students will meet with their faculty coordinators bi-weekly, write reflective journals based on assigned readings and internship experiences, and submit final written papers evaluating their internship learning. Students will also be evaluated by their agency supervisors based on achievement of learning contract goals established at the outset. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing; permission of the instructor; and completion of at least five courses in the major.
  
  •  

    PUBH 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Public Health department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Public Health department. 

  
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    PUBH 385 - The Impact of Clean Water: Honduras

    (4)
    SU. Rural communities in Honduras must rely on localized systems for clean water, usually point-of-use filtration. Students in this course will address the lack of sustainable systems by helping to implement new filter systems on site and surveying communities to quantify the impact of clean water on health. Students will learn how the availability of clean water relates to nutrition, poverty, life expectancy, education, employment, and income of the local community. Students will discern the nature of the problem regarding clean water availability on a local, national, and global level; and also wrestle with potential solutions to this pervasive and complex problem. Students will discuss the role of clean water in promoting equity, and access to clean water as a basic human right. Students will integrate various disciplines together to propose sustainable solutions that are culturally appropriate. Travel costs will be paid for through a grant for the Clean Water Institute of Calvin University. This course satisfies the core tag for Environmental Sustainability.
  
  •  

    PUBH 395 - Integrative Seminar in Public Health

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This seminar revisits the major’s learning goals through advanced study of public health’s foundation areas of inquiry (biostatistics, epidemiology, health behavior, health care policy, and global/environmental health). Students are involved in seminar presentations and the preparation of a major integrative research paper and/or project. Prerequisite: senior standing or instructor permission; six major courses (excluding PUBH 295) must be completed or in progress.
  
  •  

    PUBH 500 - Foundations of Public Health

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Public health is a multidisciplinary and vast field that seeks to protect, improve, and promote health and well-being among individuals, communities, and populations. Foundations of public health provides an opportunity to explore the profession—including its history, values and ethics, core functions, practice areas and services. This course will prepare you for subsequent courses in the public health curriculum, providing you with a foundational understanding of how public health interacts with population health.
  
  •  

    PUBH 502 - Epidemiology

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in different human populations and the application of methods to improve disease outcomes. This course will introduce you to studies of the history and basic principles of epidemiology including measures of disease frequency, epidemiologic study design, bias, confounding, screening, and causality. You will also examine common ethical issues in epidemiologic research and practice.
  
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    PUBH 504 - Biostatistics

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Understanding and interpreting data is a necessary skill for understanding health metrics and making good public health decisions. You will learn statistical methods and principles necessary for understanding, calculating, and interpreting data used in public health and policy evaluation and formation. Topics include descriptive statistics, graphical data summary, sampling, probability and distributions, statistical comparison of groups, correlation, and regression. Crosslisted as KIN 504.
  
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    PUBH 506 - Environmental Health and Justice

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Our environment influences our health and well-being in profound ways. In this course you will explore the basic principles, practices, and major issues in environmental health. We will also examine justice issues related to our environment and explore the environmental justice movement. You will investigate strategies for applying and evaluating environmental health and justice principles and strategies to address looming environmental health challenges such as global climate change, managing hazardous waste, etc.
  
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    PUBH 508 - Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health

    (3)
    Offered as needed. We live in an era when advances in medical technology and treatment rush at us so fast and furiously that it is easy to lose sight of the critical role of our own behavior in our health and longevity. Health behaviors, attitudes, and overall well-being are also influenced by our gender, age, personality, ethnic and cultural background. This course will promote your understanding of, and respect for, the differences among groups of people; it will increase your awareness of the special challenges and problems faced by various groups. Some of the challenges are, of course, beyond our control, but many are not. We will use research evidence to structure our understanding of social and behavioral aspects of health. We will evaluate appropriate outcomes of behavioral modifications related to health and well-being. Crosslisted as KIN 508.  
  
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    PUBH 510 - Religion, Spirituality, and Health

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Religion has long been known to influence our behavior and spiritual health. Only in the past two decades have we researched and learned that religious participation can impact an individual’s physical and mental health. The next logical step would be, if religion and spirituality can affect an individual’s physical and mental health, then it could also affect public health. This course will examine psychological concepts of human behavior, apply these concepts, and thereby understand human behavior in the context of religion, individual health, and public health. We will use the framework of the Biblical nature of humans as our guide through this course. In this course we will ask questions like: Under what conditions does religion promote health, under what conditions can religion harm well-being, what psychological concepts contribute to spiritual, physical, and mental health, and how does the biopsychosocial-spiritual aspect of individual health influence public health? 
  
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    PUBH 521 - Foundations of Global Health

    (3)
    Offered as needed. The world continues to become more interconnected, providing opportunities for both the spread of disease but also collective problem solving. This course sets the foundation for understanding how globalization affects population health across the world, introduces how we quantify the global burden of disease, identifies the global actors responsible for setting health policies and their roles, and provides a context for health and human rights. Students will identify key global health issues and needs, such as infant and maternal health, infectious diseases, and nutrition, as well as determinants of health in these areas.
  
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    PUBH 522 - Designing and Evaluating Global Public Health Interventions

    (3)
    Offered as needed. The development and evaluation of culturally appropriate public health interventions is critical in global public health efforts. Using case studies and examples from across the world, students will be introduced to ways in which interventions succeeded and failed due to the level of engagement with and understanding of local populations. Community-based strategies and frameworks will be discussed and assessed. There will be particular emphasis on how thoughtful public health interventions and evaluations can promote health equity and reduce the global burden of disease. Students will identify challenges to implementing and evaluating programs and policies, and will seek solutions to these challenges.
  
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    PUBH 523 - Global Health Management and Policy

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Political decision-making and leadership heavily influence population health. Students will identify the links between global health governance, policy, and system reform to global health inequalities. Students will evaluate the roles of key global actors and stakeholders in effecting health outcomes. We will identify best practices in implementing health policy management in effective, ethical, and culturally-appropriate ways. Students will gain preliminary experience in several public health administrative skills such as budgeting, grant writing, and effective leadership. Case studies and examples will be utilized to demonstrate how policy and administrative decisions are made and how they influence population health.
  
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    PUBH 524 - Health and Human Rights

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Health and the right to health are intertwined with many other rights, freedoms, and entitlements including food, housing, and employment. Students will explore these connections with a focus on vulnerable populations and intersectionality. Students will engage with and analyze core ethical principles, significant documents, and the efforts of key stakeholders as they relate to health and human rights. The course will introduce human-rights based approaches as means to addressing these inequities that disproportionately affect marginalized populations.
  
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    PUBH 525 - Special Topics in Global Health

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course will provide opportunities for in-depth review and discussions of selected global health issues. The issues will be related to contemporary global health challenges as well as other relevant topics to strengthen or complement the existing topics in the other courses in the masters in public health program. The topics will include consideration of determinants of health associated with these topics/conditions, prevention strategies, and the important factors such as cultural, economic, behavioral, social, environmental, ethical and political factors that must be considered when addressing these global health issues. Collaborative and partnership factors important for promoting global health will also be considered. The topics will be preselected by the instructor and may vary each term. Examples of some of the topics include partnership development including grant writing and seeking funds for global health programs. Other topics include maternal and infant health; emerging infectious diseases; intentional and unintentional injuries including accidents; chronic diseases such as cardiovascular problems, diabetes, cancer and mental illness; selected tropical diseases; and environmental health and sustainability. Teaching strategies will include lectures and discussions, guest speakers, student presentations.
  
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    PUBH 531 - Principles of Infectious Disease

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course will introduce students to infectious agents important for public health, including the major viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic agents in global and local health and disease for humans. Topics will include transmission of disease, host-pathogen interactions, mechanisms of disease, host immune response to pathogens, and available vaccines and drugs. Students will also be introduced to infectious disease ecology, including environmental aspects that affect disease transmission and patterns of disease.
  
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    PUBH 532 - Infectious Disease Epidemiology

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course will focus on the application of epidemiology methods to the investigation of infectious diseases. Students will expand knowledge and understanding of the interactions of infectious agents and their hosts, vectors, and environments by examining epidemiology design, measurement, analysis, and intervention issues associated with the infectious diseases.
  
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    PUBH 533 - Public Health Immunology

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course will cover the fundamentals of immunology and specific immune responses to pathogenic disease. Students will examine the different arms of the immune system (adaptive and innate), specific cells types and responses to bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Topics will include host-pathogen interactions, immune system failures, therapeutics, and vaccines.
  
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    PUBH 534 - Current Issues in Infectious Disease

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course will focus on current topics and challenges that relate to infectious diseases. Some potential areas of focus include climate change and vector-borne disease, antimicrobial resistance, emerging pathogens, outbreak and pandemic response, globalization and infectious disease, and mass vaccination. Current challenges to public health will be investigated from biological, social, economic, and political perspectives in this interdisciplinary course.
  
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    PUBH 535 - Public Health Surveillance and Monitoring

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course will introduce concepts, implementation, and evaluation of surveillance systems to monitor the health of human populations. Topics covered in this course include the history of public health surveillance, systematic collection techniques, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data. This course will also examine the ethical and legal implications of public health surveillance systems.
  
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    PUBH 536 - Molecular Biology of Pathogens

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course will cover pathogen regulation of gene expression, genetics, the action of anti-pathogen agents at the molecular level, and the relevance of this knowledge to understanding microbial pathogenesis and the host response. In addition, prokaryotic and eukaryotic model systems of gene regulation will be compared to emphasize the conceptual aspects and application of molecular biology to infectious disease. Current molecular techniques will be explored as they apply to research, diagnostics, and treatment of infectious diseases.
  
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    PUBH 580 - Public Health Internship

    (3)
    Offered as needed. Public health is a professional degree and thus, practical experience is paramount to the MPH program. This course allows you to apply public health skills and knowledge to an agency or field setting. The internship is paired with a professional seminar to provide intentional opportunities for you to connect course content with their practice in the field. You are required to complete at least 130 hours in the field setting along with a weekly course. Prerequisites: All foundational public health courses must be complete prior to enrolling in the practicum course and be in good standing within the public health program.
  
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    PUBH 595 - Leadership in Public Health

    (3)
    Offered as needed. This course provides you with the opportunity to demonstrate advanced understanding of public health and the ability to integrate your learning experience. Using a seminar-based learning approach, we will process and apply our understanding of public health as experienced throughout the curriculum. We will seek to identify and address ethical issues in our respective fields of practice, throughout integrating a Reformed Christian lens to our understanding. Prerequisites: PUBH 500, PUBH 502, PUBH 504, PUBH 506, PUBH 508, and PUBH 510.

Recreation

  
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    RECR 203 - Leadership in Recreation Programs

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course is designed to conduct an in depth investigation of basic leadership skills related to the delivery of recreation programs and related human services within a Christian worldview. An overview of the leadership theories, concepts, and strategies related to the delivery of human services will be provided. A leadership lab will be used to develop and practice team building skills, group facilitation, and leadership techniques, as well as problem solving skills that will be useful in leading recreation programs.
  
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    RECR 205 - Therapeutic Recreation and Diagnostic Groups

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A general orientation to therapeutic recreation and its role in serving the needs of persons with varying abilities. The etiology, characteristics, and considerations for treatment of persons with a wide range of common diseases and disorders are reviewed and discussed. Practical application and adaptations for serving the recreation and leisure needs of persons with disabilities will be made.
  
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    RECR 304 - Management of Leisure Services

    (3)
    A study of principles, policies, theories, and procedures involved in the organization and administration of leisure services in a variety of settings. Students will develop a professional portfolio and explore career opportunities in their discipline. Topics Include: staffing and human resources, organizational culture and structure, and legal aspects and employer relations. Prerequisite: KIN 201 or RECR 203. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    RECR 305 - Program Planning and Development

    (3)
    SP. A study of the principles and techniques of recreation, sport, and health program development. The application of a program development model, which is used in the organization and planning of recreation programs, is emphasized. Students will design a program from the bottom up, including: needs assessment, mission and goals, staffing, risk management, promotion, and evaluation. This course is a requirement for Recreation, Sports Management, and Exercise Science majors and will be offered once each academic year. Prerequisite: Sophomore status.
  
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    RECR 308 - Recreation Program and Facility Management

    (3)
    This course will review the principles and procedures related to the operation and care of private and public recreation resources, areas, and facilities. Topics will include: Establishment of legal authority for operations, developing policies and guidelines, interagency coordination and/or competition, safety and security, and systems evaluation. Prerequisite: RECR 305 or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    RECR 310 - Theory and Philosophy of Therapeutic Recreation

    (3)
    FA. Capstone course. This seminar course reviews the theories and philosophies of work, play, and leisure and their influence on contemporary culture. Discussions on selected readings help develop an understanding of the political, sociological, psychological, economic, and theological aspects of work, play, and leisure in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on the development of a Reformed Christian perspective and its implications for personal life and professional practice. Prerequisites: biblical foundations I or theological foundations I, developing a Christian mind, and philosophical foundations.
  
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    RECR 312 - Special Topics in Recreation and Leisure Studies

    (3)
    This course will provide a format to investigate relevant topics that are not sufficiently covered in the core recreation curriculum. Given the broad range of topics within the recreation profession, a rotating curriculum enables students to study various issues in greater detail. Topics may include: 1) Alternative (i.e. volunteer, community-based) travel & tourism, 2) Wilderness & Adventure Education and 3) Social Entrepreneurship. Topics will rotate and the course will be offered every other year. This course is a requirement for Recreation majors. Prerequisite: Sophomore status. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    RECR 314 - Programming Principles of Therapeutic Recreation

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. An introduction to the history, philosophy, and concepts of therapeutic recreation. An orientation to the role and function of therapeutic recreation personnel in the treatment of persons with psychological impairments, physical impairments, developmental impairments, pediatric illnesses, and the problems of aging are presented. Prerequisite: KIN 201 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    RECR 324 - Therapeutic Recreation Clinical Practice

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. An introduction to the basic methods and techniques used in the delivery of therapeutic recreation services. Skills in interpersonal and helping relationships are reviewed and practiced in the context of their application to specific treatment approaches including leisure counseling, play therapy, physical confidence classes, stress challenge, and physical fitness programs. Prerequisites: KIN 201 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    RECR 326 - Intervention Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. Therapeutic recreation (TR) programs contain a theoretically sound and effective set of treatment protocols. It is important for practitioners to be able to identify client needs and select appropriate interventions to meet those needs. This course will provide students with clinical skills related to diverse treatment modalities and facilitation techniques through intentional observations of the programs delivered by master clinicians and hands-on experience of diverse treatment interventions. Prerequisite: KIN 201 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    RECR 345 - Field Seminar in Therapeutic Recreation

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. Therapeutic recreation students work with field and university supervisors to develop an understanding of the assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation process in therapeutic recreation settings. Case studies from the agency and from selected publications provide the framework for these learning outcomes that are developed in a weekly seminar. Prerequisite: KIN 201 
  
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    RECR 346 - Field Internship in Recreation/Therapeutic Recreation

    (3, 12)
    SP, SU. An internship or field experience at an approved agency, institution, or service as specified by a student’s major and advisor in recreation. Where applicable, the seminar focuses on the problems and issues involved in relating theory to professional practice. Prerequisite: Therapeutic Recreation majors must first complete all courses in the recreation program. All students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of C (2.0) and the approval of the department advisor.
  
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    RECR 380 - Individual Competencies

    (1)
    FA, SP. This course assists students in the development of a portfolio documenting essential skills and experiences needed to prepare them for professional practice in the disciplines of health, physical education, recreation, and dance. Students will document their skill competence in a variety of fitness, movement/dance and sport activities, as well as document proficiency in teaching, administrative, and professional competencies. This course is cross-listed with KIN 380.
  
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    RECR 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Kinesiology department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Kinesiology department. 

  
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    RECR 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP.

Religion: Basic Courses

  
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    REL 121 - Biblical Literature and Theology

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. This course is a study of the Bible within its literary, historical, cultural, and canonical context in order to understand its central theological teachings.
  
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    REL 131 - Christian Theology

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of Christian theology in light of its historical development and ongoing significance, this course surveys the central teachings of the Christian Church as rooted in the Bible, formulated by key theologians, and summarized in the ecumenical creeds and Reformed confessions.

Religion: Intermediate Biblical Studies Courses

  
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    REL 211 - Pentateuch

    (3)
    SP. A study of the first five books of the Bible. This course examines the accounts of creation, the fall, Israel’s ancestors, the exodus, and the giving of the Law. Theological issues explored include the nature of God, human beings, and the world, our covenantal relationship with God, and the presence of God in historical events. Prerequisite: REL 121 or REL 131. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
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    REL 212 - Old Testament Historical Books

    (3)
    SP. This course explores the Old Testament books of Joshua through 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah in terms of their literary features, historical settings, and theological themes. Particular attention is devoted to the prophetic character of these works, which provide a theological interpretation of Israel’s history. Prerequisite: REL 121 or REL 131.
 

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