2021-2022 Catalog 
    
    Jun 17, 2024  
2021-2022 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Chicago Semester Program

  
  • CSP 305 - Values and Vocation

    (3)
    FA, SP. Reflections on Work and the Common Good. This course explores from a variety of perspectives on the concept of vocation. Drawing on readings from religion, theology, and sociology, students will examine the ways in which we discern our calling in light of our responsibility to engage the common good. Students will also look at social structures that impact work and family life (gender, race, religion, and class) and how they might shape our understanding of vocation.
  
  • CSP 345 - Field Internship

    (9)
    FA, SP. Students enrolled in the Chicago Semester program have a large number of placements available to them. Students may select internships from a range of organizations, which include banks, businesses, hospitals, media, mental health clinics, churches, social agencies, public services, and civic institutions. The student interns are supervised on the job by Chicago semester staff members.
  
  • CSP 390 - Urban Planning, Development and the Sustainable City.

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course explores the evolution and development of the city, with particular emphasis on the built environment in Chicago. Students will explore the significance of the city’s architecture, sculpture, parks, community murals, and impacts of city design. Students will seek to understand and critique the city’s built environment through field trips, guest speakers, readings, and class discussions.

Chinese

  
  • CHIN 101 - Elementary Chinese I

    (4)
    FA. An introduction to Chinese language and culture, stressing both spoken and written Chinese. After one-semester students will be able to carry on simple conversations in (Mandarin) Chinese, read dialogues written in Chinese, and understand some fundamentals of Chinese social values and ways of thinking. Approximately 300 Chinese characters will be introduced.
  
  • CHIN 102 - Elementary Chinese II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of CHIN 101. Continued study of Chinese grammar, with equal emphasis on improving conversational proficiency and on reading and writing Chinese. Another 300 Chinese Characters will be introduced for reading and writing and as a medium for gaining insight into Chinese culture. Prerequisite: CHIN 101  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese I

    (4)
    FA. A continuation of CHIN 101. Continued study of Chinese grammar, with equal emphasis on improving conversational proficiency and on reading and writing Chinese. Another 300 Chinese Characters will be introduced for reading and writing and as a medium for gaining insight into Chinese culture. Prerequisite: CHIN 102  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of CHIN 201. Completion of the study of basic Chinese grammar and further study of the Chinese writing system, with continued emphasis on both speaking and reading. Two hundred more Characters are taught for reading comprehension and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: CHIN 201  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CHIN 301 - Advanced Chinese Language I

    (4)
    FA. This course is designed to develop advanced aural comprehension skills as well as advanced competence in spoken Chinese through exercises, drills, and conversation in class. Students will also continue their study of the written language by reading extended dialogues on various topics in class as well as doing a large number of written assignments, including short essays on aspects of daily life. Prerequisite: CHIN 202  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CHIN 302 - Advanced Chinese Language II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of the work in CHIN 301, students complete a systematic study of advanced grammar and composition. Students will learn many new Chinese characters as they improve their skills in written Chinese. Conversation practice will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: CHIN 301  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CHIN 311 - Readings on Chinese Society and Culture

    (3)
    FA. A continuation of advanced Chinese language study using selected readings in Chinese on Chinese history, society, and culture. Conversation practice in Chinese will continue to be emphasized. Prerequisite: CHIN 302  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CHIN 312 - Further Readings on Chinese Society and Culture

    (3)
    SP. This course builds on CHIN 311 and includes further language study and selected readings on Chinese history, society, and culture. Conversation practice in Chinese will continue to be emphasized. Prerequisite: CHIN 311  or permission of the instructor.
  
  • CHIN 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.   Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Chinese department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Chinese department. 

Classics

  
  • CLAS 211 - Classical Literature

    (3)
    SP. This is a study of the major works of Greek and Roman literature from Homer to Augustine. The course devotes attention to the origins and development of Greek epic, lyric, drama, and historiography, and to their transformation in the literature of Rome and the church fathers. Artistic and archaeological evidence supplements the study of the texts.
  
  • CLAS 221 - Classical Art and Architecture

    (3)
    SP. This is a study of the major arts of ancient Greek and Roman civilization from the Bronze Age to the late Empire. The course devotes attention to the origins and development of Greek sculpture, painting, and architecture, and to their transformation in the arts of Rome. Ancient literary sources supplement the study of material culture in this investigation of Greek and Roman culture.
  
  • CLAS 231 - Classical Mythology

    (3)
    FA. This is a study of the major themes in classical mythology via the literature and art of Greece and Rome. The course includes a study of major literary sources in translation and major art works of both cultures, with special attention to various interpretations of the myths and the works of art they have influenced in the development of Western culture.
  
  • CLAS 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum may be counted toward graduation  requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.           Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department.  Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.

     

     


Communication

  
  • COMM 101 - Oral Rhetoric

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. Students examine the principles of oral and visual rhetoric in this course, with an emphasis on guided practice in the development of effective speeches. The course leads students to understand the role of rhetoric in society, to think critically about rhetorical situations and practices, and to gain proficiency in the art of rhetoric.
  
  • COMM 141 - Visual Rhetoric

    (3)
    SU. This course is a study of the rhetoric of images, how images create meaning, and how images are used to persuade. It leads students to understand the relationship between the rhetoric of images, the various audiences for those images, and their social contexts. Students learn to critique the construction of images, the ethical use of images, and the various meanings of images.
  
  • COMM 145 - Introduction to Film and Media

    (4)
    FA, SP. A study of film and other moving image media as art forms and cultural phenomena, including dramatic, visual, and sonic elements, theme and focus, acting, and directorial style. Topics covered include the materials and methods of media production, the major styles and genres of moving image media, and the relationship of film and television to American and world culture. Course work includes a mandatory weekly screening (lab) and readings in the history, theory, and criticism of film and television.
  
  • COMM 180 - Communicating with Digital Media

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introduction to the principles and practice of communicating a message to an audience through digital images (still pictures, moving pictures, and graphics) and digital sound (voice, music, ambient sound, and sound effects). Students will learn the fundamental techniques of preproduction planning, camera use, lighting, sound, and editing in order to communicate their ideas effectively, artistically, and ethically. Students also will learn to communicate their messages through digital channels, especially the Internet. The course will enable students interested in social media, public relations, advertising, journalism, corporate training, sales, e-learning, publishing, worship, and the arts to realize ideas through sound and image. Students intending to take advanced Media Production courses must take COMM 190.
  
  • COMM 190 - Media Production I

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introductory course in film-style production. Instruction includes pre-production planning, scriptwriting, image capture, sound, lighting and editing. Students will produce a series of exercises and a short finished video. Equipment is provided. Prerequisite for 200- and 300-level Digital Filmmaking courses.
  
  • COMM 200 - Advanced Oral Rhetoric

    (3)
    SP. Composition and presentation of types of speeches, participation in various types of speeches, participation in various types of discussion, readings in rhetorical theory, and criticism of selected contemporary speeches. Prerequisite: COMM 101  or equivalent.
  
  • COMM 201 - New Media

    (3)
    SP. New Media offers students an advanced understanding of new media technologies, especially the ways in which new media have influenced human communication practices. Students will investigate cultural and rhetorical elements of online communities, virtual environments, new media technologies, digital communication strategies, and a variety of contemporary issues in the computerization of communication in work, home, church, and public discourse. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 214 - Creating Communication Arts in the Classroom

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course addresses how the communication arts, such as creative drama, reader’s theater, and puppetry facilitate learning in educational settings. Students learn to analyze verbal and non-verbal communication, they engage in the strategies of rhetoric (such as organization, invention, and style) appropriate to the learning process, and they apply these skills and knowledge in school settings.
  
  • COMM 222 - Calvin Media Company

    (1)
    FA, SP. Students will participate in film, radio, and television productions. Students may participate more than one semester, but no more than four semester hours may be applied toward major or graduation requirements. Permission of instructor required.
  
  • COMM 231 - Intercultural Communication

    (3)
    FA, SP. An examination of the anthropological principles relating to cross-cultural communication. This examination requires an extensive comparison of the components of cultural systems and the nature of cultural dynamics. The areas of application include government, business, Peace Corps, development, and mission work, with special emphasis on the last two. Special topics include developing an appropriate attitude regarding indigenous cultures and the management of culture shock. Also listed as SOC 231.
  
  • COMM 240 - Group Communication

    (3)
    FA. Small group communication theory and practice. Students participate in group projects leading to class presentations. Topics include leadership, discussion, roles, consensus, organization, decision making, leadership, and persuasion. Standards for ethical conduct are considered throughout the course.
  
  • COMM 248 - Writing for the Media

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to the content, styles, and formats of media scripts. The course emphasizes the differences in media writing compared with more familiar forms of writing, the role of the script as text in producing media programs, the styles of writing used (journalistic, dramatic, polemical, and emotive), and the technical requirements for scripts used to focus the work of directors, actors, camera, and sound technicians, editors and mixers in creating a media product. Topics: playwriting and scriptwriting. Prerequisite: COMM 190 .
  
  • COMM 249 - Digital Audio Production

    (3)
    SP. A course in the ethical, aesthetic, technical, and organizational principles that govern the recording and post-production of dialogue, music, and effects. Prerequisite: COMM 190 .
  
  • COMM 250 - Multi-Camera Production

    (3)
    An introduction to the theory and practice of studio-based video production. Various program formats are discussed and evaluated in light of particular communication principles and needs. Students gain experience with stationary video cameras, recorders, switchers, and related technologies. Performance for the camera, studio lighting, audio recording, and mixing principles are analyzed and demonstrated. Prerequisite: COMM 190 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 254 - Screen Storytelling: Theory and Criticism

    (3)
    FA. The theory and criticism of film and television storytelling, both fiction and nonfiction. Students critically engage with academic writing and criticism published in magazines, newspapers, and other media outlets with a focus on the relation and practice of theory and criticism.
  
  • COMM 255 - Documentary Film and Television

    (4)
    SP. An examination of the history, aesthetics, ethics, and cultural and institutional functions of documentary film and television. Course includes a mandatory weekly screening (lab).
  
  • COMM 260 - Interpersonal Communication

    (3)
    The interpersonal communication opportunities and problems faced by Christians as they seek to live the life of faith in contemporary society. The course focuses on the theories and the practice of interpersonal communication. Topics include the elements of dyadic communication, shyness, gender, conflict management, and relational enrichment. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 263 - Communication and Conflict Resolution

    (3)
    An introduction to the theory and practice of communication and conflict resolution. Students will investigate the dynamics of conflict, theories of communication relevant to conflict resolution, conflict resolution processes and strategies, and how to make an inevitable part of human existence productive rather than destructive. Students will learn to analyze, interpret, and evaluate conflict and how to resolve conflict through a theoretically informed understanding of human communication. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 264 - Communication and Ministry Leadership

    (3)
    A significant aspect of every Christian’s vocation is service to the Church. In this course, students will explore how communication can be used in this Christian vocation as members of a congregation and/or ministry leaders. Students will develop their ability to communicate in order to help the Church lead people in prayer and the reading of Scripture, share the good news of Jesus Christ, and defend the Christian faith. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 265 - Leadership Communication for Organizations

    (3)
    This course examines the role that communication plays in effective leadership in various organizational contexts such as business, nonprofit, and churches. The course introduces students to various ways of conceptualizing leadership communication and helps students apply that knowledge to understand and analyze the role of communication competence in the practice of leadership. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 270 - Communication and Gender

    (3)
    Study and Christian evaluation of the relations between communication and gender, especially in interpersonal relationships, family, business, religious organizations, and educational institutions and religious settings. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 285 - Public Relations and Communication Practice

    (3)
    FA. In this course students will examine how and why organizations use public relations to communicate with various publics. The course covers the historical development of public relations, the profession’s ethical obligations, the intersection between communication theory and public relations practice, and the necessary skills in adapting messages to specific audiences.
  
  • COMM 286 - Advertising and Communication Strategies

    (3)
    SP. This course introduces students to the theory and application of advertising and develops their skills in strategic, creative communication. The course covers the history of advertising, the application of communication theory in the advertising process, the planning and creation of advertising messages for multiple media platforms, ethics, and the role of creativity in advertising.
  
  • COMM 290 - Media Production II

    (4)
    FA. An intermediate-level course in video production. Course includes further development of technical and creative skills, with special emphasis on the planning and production of documentaries, narrative, and art films. Prerequisite: COMM 190 .
  
  • COMM 296 - Film as a Narrative Art

    (3)
    In-depth examination of the art of narrative film, focusing each semester on one or more directors, genres, or styles of filmmaking. The course pays particular attention to narration and narrative structure, characterization, conflict, setting, and point of view and also acquaints students with literary adaptation and with the contribution of film image and sound to narrative development. The course emphasizes the development of student skills in writing about film. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 305 - Persuasion and Propaganda

    (3)
    FA. The theory and practice of persuasive communication. Topics include theory and research of persuasion, improving personal persuasive abilities, recognizing and resisting persuasive strategies, and the role of propaganda in modern society. Examples for analysis are taken from advertising, religion, sales, political campaigns, and democratic and totalitarian propaganda.
  
  • COMM 311 - Argumentation and Advocacy

    (3)
    SP. A study and application of basic principles of argumentation and advocacy. This course focuses on the dynamics of oral argument-ethical dimensions, use of language, informal logic, use of evidence and appeals, structure, and interactions with other arguments. Through analysis and practice, students will learn not only how to argue within academic contexts but also how to apply argumentative reasoning to everyday communication.
  
  • COMM 316 - Directing for Stage and Screen

    (4)
    An introduction to the practice and theory of directing. Through readings, critical analysis of scripts, discussions, performance exercises, and critique of live and filmed performance, students develop an understanding of the directing process from the inception of the script to the final product. Students create a full directorial analysis of a script and produce several finished scenes, applying rehearsal techniques, working with actors and learning to enhance their own productions through careful criticism and thoughtful assessment of the art of directing. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 322 - Advanced Calvin Media Company

    (1)
    FA, SP. Students participate in select aspects of advanced media-production projects. Prequisite: permission of instructor.
  
  • COMM 330 - Media and Society

    (3)
    SP. A study of the role of diverse forms of media in society and an examination of critical and cultural perspectives on media. The course examines the media as a source of influential narratives, and offers an understanding of the relationship of media to democracy, capitalism, technology, audiences, media institutions, and economics. This course is cross listed with COMM 530 Media and Society  . 
  
  • COMM 346 - Internship in Communication

    (3)
    FA. In this weekly seminar course, students reflect on how to work, relate, and communicate effectively in professional settings. Academic work includes weekly seminar participation, readings, journals, a presentation, and a professional portfolio.  Grading is based on these requirements as well as the internship supervisor’s evaluation. Students must intern in a professional setting (for-profit or non-profit) a minimum of 10 hours each week throughout the semester they are enrolled in the course. Before the semester begins, students should find an internship that fits with their professional interests and will provide them with opportunities for new learning under the supervision of an expert. In order to engage the various levels of learning that an internship affords, we require students to intern off-campus and prefer that they work on-site at an organization rather than telecommuting. Prerequisites: junior or senior status, and 2.5 GPA.
  
  • COMM 351 - Media Production III

    (3)
    FA, SP. The intensive study and production of video in a particular style or genre. The course focus, designated by a subtitle, will alternate among various genres of style, content, and form. Thorough investigation of creative, ethical, and technical requirements will culminate in student-produced projects. Prerequisite: COMM 290 .
  
  • COMM 358 - Advanced Project in Media Production

    (2)
    FA, SP. Teams of students will complete department-approved media production projects over the course of two semesters. This culminating experience will give students the opportunity to apply concepts and techniques acquired in prerequisite courses by developing and producing an independent media project. Student teams may include students from COMM 322 in one or both semesters. Students will demonstrate progress in regular meetings with a supervising faculty member, submit a report on the project’s status for evaluation at the end of the first semester, and submit the final project for evaluation at the end of the second semester. (Note: This course must be taken in consecutive semesters.) Prerequisites: COMM 351  and permission of instructor.
  
  • COMM 361 - Health Communication Theory and Practice

    (3)
    SP. This course introduces students to the broad and complex field of health communication through the study of multi-disciplinary research, theory, and health communication practice in interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass-mediated contexts. Through analyzing crucial contemporary health issues, ethical dilemmas, case studies, and creating a health intervention campaign, students explore the centrality of communication for increasing health literacy, decreasing unhealthy behavior, and closing the health care inequity gap.
  
  • COMM 362 - Organizational Communication

    (3)
    This course will instruct students in the theories, principles and practices of business communication. Subject matter will include organizational culture, communication ethics, conflict negotiation, public presentations, appropriate uses of visual aids, listening, interviewing, and business writing. Prerequisite: COMM 101  or COMM 141 , and ENGL 101 . Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 381 - Topics in Film and Media History

    (4)
    SP. In-depth study of a major period, movement, national cinema, development, genre, director, or producer in film and media history. An exploration of film and media as a complex phenomenon, an art form, and technology-based medium of communication in the context of culture, technology, society, and economics. A weekly screening lab is mandatory. This course may be repeated as long as the topic is unique. 
  
  • COMM 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  • COMM 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP, SU. Independent study of topics of interest to particular students, under the supervision of a member of the department. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.
  
  • COMM 395 - Special Topics in Communication

    (3)
    Topic, readings, and assignments will be announced prior to the year offered. Designed for students from various majors. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • COMM 399 - Advanced Communication Study

    (3)
    FA, SP. A focused study of selected topics in a discipline of communication (film, media, rhetoric, or theatre) that builds upon previous communication coursework, methods, and theories. Coursework involves lecture, discussion, seminar presentations, and the preparation of a major research paper or project. Prerequisites: Two advanced courses within the department and junior or senior status.
  
  • COMM 500 - Basics of Media Production

    (1)
    FA, SP. This one-week intensive workshop will train students in the basic skills of audiovisual media design. Students will work hands-on with the essential technology and software to begin building the necessary skillsets to become fluent and engaging multimedia content producers.
  
  • COMM 510 - Storytelling across Media Platforms

    (4)
    FA, SP. A study of the principles of storytelling integrating theory, critique, and hands-on experience as a way of learning best practices and understanding what makes for effective multimedia storytelling. Students will learn to become intentional about leveraging the strengths of different media to communicate synergistically in ways that single-medium stories cannot and to grasp the crucial role of perspectives in storytelling and audience reception.
  
  • COMM 511 - Audience Research and Analytics

    (3)
    FA, SP. Audience research is significant for media organizations to find target consumers and formulate their communication strategies. This course intends to provide useful knowledge of audience research. It covers the current audience research methodologies and theories, the ratings industry and analysis processes. The major subjects of this course include sampling methods, data collection methods, quantitative methods, qualitative methods, the theories of audience behaviors, gross measures, cumulative measures, online audience research, and global audiences.
  
  • COMM 512 - Communication Ethics and Law

    (3)
    FA. Students will learn about their legal rights, legal obligations, and ethical responsibilities as communicators. They also will investigate the principles on which those rights, obligations, and responsibilities are based—including social and cultural values, Christian virtues, and professional standards. In addition, they will learn to exercise legal and moral reasoning when confronted with challenging situations in their vocation. Finally, they will learn about the temptations and consequences of violating legal and ethical directives—and will commit to communicating in a legal and ethical way.
  
  • COMM 520 - Advanced Public Relations

    (3)
    SP. This course introduces students to the strategic planning process, communication strategies, and message creation involved in public relations. Students will learn how to develop, implement and evaluate public relations campaigns by examining case studies and creating an actual campaign. This course also focuses on the use of social media and other new media channels, examining how they can be employed to better serve the organization’s communication and relationship building needs. Students must enroll in COMM 520 Media Lab to create the class multimedia project.
  
  • COMM 520L - Media Lab

    (1)
    SP. Multimedia skills are necessary for today’s applied communication careers. Required media labs will be offered in conjunction with COMM 520, COMM 521, and COMM 522. In each lab, students will develop multimedia assignments using the concepts, theories, and strategies from the corresponding class along with the multimedia tools and technology introduced in the Basics of Media Production intensive week.
  
  • COMM 521 - Advanced Advertising

    (3)
    SP. This course explores advertising as an institution in society and as a communication process. Designed as a comprehensive view of the subject, the course includes such topics as advertising history, regulation, communication theory and practice, the role of advertising in the marketing mix, the organization of the advertising agency, marketing/advertising research, and the creative uses of various advertising media. Students will assess strategy, and participate in the formulation of an advertising campaign. Students must enroll in COMM 521 Media Lab to create the class multimedia campaign.
  
  • COMM 521L - Media Lab

    (1)
    SP. Multimedia skills are necessary for today’s applied communication careers. Required media labs will be offered in conjunction with COMM 520, COMM 521, and COMM 522. In each lab, students will develop multimedia assignments using the concepts, theories, and strategies from the corresponding class along with the multimedia tools and technology introduced in the Basics of Media Production intensive week.
  
  • COMM 522 - Multimedia Journalism

    (4)
    SP. Multimedia journalism skills are critical in today’s newsrooms as well as in journalism-adjacent settings such as public relations and advocacy. This course will provide instruction and application in the tools and techniques of journalism production across non-text platforms. Using audio, video, web development, photography and more, this course will cover journalistic fundamentals such as story development, reporting techniques, and editing.
  
  • COMM 522L - Media Lab

    (1)
    SP. Multimedia skills are necessary for today’s applied communication careers. Required media labs will be offered in conjunction with COMM 520, COMM 521, and COMM 522. In each lab, students will develop multimedia assignments using the concepts, theories, and strategies from the corresponding class along with the multimedia tools and technology introduced in the Basics of Media Production intensive week.
  
  • COMM 530 - Media and Society

    (3)
    SP. A study of the role of diverse forms of media in society and an examination of critical and cultural perspectives on media. The course examines the media as a source of influential narratives, and offers an understanding of the relationship of media to democracy, capitalism, technology, audiences, media institutions, and economics. This course is also offered as COMM 330. 
  
  • COMM 539 - Master’s Project Proposal

    (1)
    FA, SP. This course is a culmination of program learning that focuses on the creation, development, and completion of an independent final project for inclusion in their e-portfolio. Each student works with a faculty adviser throughout the process to gain further expertise and demonstrate professional competence in
    strategic communication and multimedia content design.
  
  • COMM 540 - Master’s Project

    (1, 3)
    FA, SP, SU. This course is a culmination of program learning that focuses on the creation, development, and completion of an independent final project for
    inclusion in their e-portfolio. Each student works with a faculty adviser throughout the process to gain further expertise and demonstrate
    professional competence in strategic communication and multimedia content design.
  
  • COMM 550 - Creative Media Agency

    (3)
    FA, SU. Provides students with applied agency experience in public relations, advertising, and/or multimedia journalism, using a variety of media and platforms.

Computer Science

  
  • CS 100 - Creating Interactive Web Media

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to the creation of interactive media for the World Wide Web. Coverage includes markup language, stylesheets, page layout and design principles, scripting, animation, multimedia and their representations, World Wide Web history and structure, social and ethical issues. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 104 - Applied Computing

    (2)
    FA. An introduction to problem solving and program design for engineering students. Coverage includes algorithmic thinking, problem decomposition, types and expressions, functions and parameter passing, control structures, I/O, simple data structures, and classes (including the use of inheritance). Laboratory. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 106 - Introduction to Scientific Computation and Modeling

    (4)
    FA. An introduction to computing as a tool for science, emphasizing programming as a methodology for problem solving, quantitative data analysis, and simulation in science and mathematics. This includes in silico modeling of natural phenomena, precise specification of a problem, design of its algorithmic solution, testing, debugging, and maintaining software, using scripting to increase scientific productivity, and the use of existing scientific software libraries. A secondary emphasis is the discussion of breadth topics, including historical, theoretical, ethical and biblical perspectives on computing as a discipline. This course provides an alternative to CS 108, providing an introduction to computing focusing on scientific examples and applications. Laboratory. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 108 - Introduction to Computing

    (4)
    FA, SP. An introduction to computing as a problem-solving discipline. A primary emphasis is on programming as a methodology for problem solving, including: the precise specification of a problem, the design of its solution, the encoding of that solution, and the testing, debugging and maintenance of programs. A secondary emphasis is the discussion of topics from the breadth of computing including historical, theoretical, ethical and biblical perspectives on computing as a discipline. Laboratory. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 112 - Introduction to Data Structures

    (4)
    FA, SP. A continuation of CS 108, CS 106, or CS 104, using C++ classes to introduce and implement the elementary data structures including lists, stacks, queues and trees. Advanced programming techniques such as indirection, inheritance, and templates are introduced, along with an emphasis on algorithm analysis, efficiency, and good programming style. Laboratory. Prerequisite: CS 104 , CS 106 , CS 108 , or permission of the instructor. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 195 - Introductory Computing Seminar

    (0)
    FA, SP. This seminar explores a range of current topics in computing, including topics in research and practice. Students intending to major in a computing-related field must take this course three times in their freshman and sophomore years. Prerequisite: freshman or sophomore standing.
  
  • CS 212 - Data Structures and Algorithms

    (3)
    FA. A systematic study of algorithms and their application to data structures, including arrays, lists, trees, heaps, hash tables, and graphs. Algorithms and data structures are analyzed in their use of both time and space, and the choice of data structure in problem solving is studied. Theoretical issues, such as optimality, best and worst-case performance, and limitations of algorithms are studied, as well as implementation issues. Prerequisite: CS 112 . MATH 251 , which may be taken concurrently, is recommended. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 214 - Programming Language Concepts

    (3)
    SP. Design principles and implementation issues of contemporary programming languages. Topics covered include programming paradigms, the syntax and semantics of programming language constructs, translation of high level languages to machine language, and formal languages. Several different languages are introduced and examined to illustrate these topics. Laboratory. Prerequisite: CS 112 . Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 216 - Programming Challenges

    (1)
    FA. A hands-on laboratory forum to use the data structures and mathematics of other courses on a variety of problems, ranging in difficulty. The course consists of working on a variety of problems and examining techniques used in their solution. Students may take this course multiple times, the course does not count toward the major. Grading is pass/fail. Prerequisites: CS 212  and MATH 251 , which may be taken concurrently. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • CS 232 - Operating Systems and Networking

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to the major concepts modern operating systems must address. Topics include operating system structure, processes and threads, inter-process communication and synchronization, scheduling, main and secondary memory management, file systems, networking, client-server systems, distributed systems. Prerequisite: CS 112  and either ENGR 220  or ENGR 304 , which may be taken concurrently. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 262 - Software Engineering

    (3)
    FA. A survey of software engineering principles including software project management, system and requirements analysis, the design and implementation of software, design patterns, software quality assurance and testing, software maintenance, and the use of CASE tools. Prerequisite: CS 112  and at least junior standing. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 295 - Computing Seminar

    (0)
    FA, SP. This seminar explores a range of current topics in computing, including topics in research and practice. It is a continuation of CS 195. Department majors must take this course three times during their junior and senior years. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.
  
  • CS 300 - Special Topics in Computer Science

    (3)
    FA, SP, selected years. Advanced study of selected topics of current interest in computer science. Topics vary by year. Consult the instructor or the department website for the specific topic the current offering. This course may be repeated for credit if the special topics differ. Prerequisite: varying; see department website. Lab fee: $15. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • CS 312 - Logic, Computability, and Complexity

    (4)
    FA, alternate years. Topics from the theory of computation including finite state concepts, formal languages and grammars, computability, computational complexity. Also listed as MATH 312. Prerequisite: MATH 255 .
  
  • CS 320 - Advanced Computer Architecture

    (3)
    SP, selected years. Principles of computer design, instruction set design principles, instruction-level parallelism, cache principles, and multiprocessor systems. Lab fee: $15. Not offered 2021-2022.
  
  • CS 326 - Embedded Systems and the Internet of Things

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. An introduction to topics in embedded systems and the Internet of Things (IoT) including hardware and software considerations for special-purpose computing applications that interact with the physical world. Hardware topics include microcontrollers, I/O interfacing, sensors, and actuators. Software topics include scheduling and real-time considerations, IoT network protocols, the Web of things, and embedded programming. Additional topics include discussions of related social and ethical issues such as security, privacy, reliability, and the impact of automation. Lectures will be combined with hands-on lab exercises and a final project. Prerequisites: CS 112 (may be taken concurrently) and ENGR 204 or 220, or permission of the instructor. Lab fee: $125.
  
  • CS 332 - Advanced Computer Networks

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course introduces the student to the field of computer networking. Students will develop an understanding of the general principles of computer communication as they are worked out in an appropriate protocol suite. Specific attention will be paid to principles of architecture, layering, multiplexing, addressing and address mapping, routing and naming. Problems considered include the writing of network software, the physical construction of networks, the Internet and its future development, and network security. Prerequisite: CS 112 . Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 336 - Web Development

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. An introduction to software development for websites using common platforms and frameworks. In addition to development, topics include common vulnerabilities and means of defending against them, web user interfaces and usability, and practical, legal, and ethical issues associated with building and administering websites. Prerequisite: CS 112 . Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 338 - Computer System Administration

    (4)
    SP. This course provides a holistic introduction to the support of organizational information technology infrastructure. It covers deploying hardware and software, designing and maintaining networks, and performing basic security configuration. Students work with open source and commercial platforms. Students apply these skills through multiple system implementation labs and team projects. Prerequisite: CS 112 . Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 342 - Database Management Systems

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to the structures necessary to implement a database management system. Topics include data models (including hierarchical, network and relational data models), normal forms for data relations, data description languages, query facilities. An introduction to existing database management systems is given. Prerequisite: CS 262  or DATA 202 . Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 344 - Artificial Intelligence

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to artificial intelligence. Topics include problem solving, knowledge representation, planning, machine learning, natural language processing, and robotics. Students will be introduced to programming techniques from AI such as heuristic search, expert systems, and neural networks, as well as to AI’s philosophical, psychological, and religious context. Prerequisite: CS 212 . Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 352 - Computer Graphics

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. An introduction to interactive 2D and 3D computer graphics techniques such as transformations, lighting, shading and hidden surface removal, photorealistic rendering including ray tracing and image processing. Programming projects with graphics libraries such as Qt and OpenGL. Prerequisite: CS 212  or CS 214 . Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 364 - Computer Security

    (4)
    SP. An introduction to the principles of computing security. Topics include encryption, protocols, security models, trusted systems, program security, network security, legal and ethical issues. Laboratory. Prerequisite: junior standing and at least one of CS 232  or CS 332 , which may be taken concurrently. Lab fee: $135.
  
  • CS 374 - High Performance Computing

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A study of architectures, algorithms and programming techniques that help minimize the execution times of computer programs that solve particular problems. Topics include high performance computer architectures, parallel programming techniques for distributed and shared-memory multiprocessors, code optimization and hands-on experience using the Calvin University supercomputer. Laboratory. Prerequisite: CS 112  and junior standing, or permission of instructor. Lab fee: $15.
  
  • CS 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  • CS 384 - Perspectives on Computing

    (3)
    SP. This course addresses social, ethical, legal and professional issues that arise in computer science from a reformed, Christian perspective. Social issues concerning the computerization of society include privacy, security, the digital divide and changes in the way people receive information and relate with others. Ethical discussion starts with a survey of ethical theories and covers professional, ethical and legal issues in areas including intellectual property, privacy, liability and professional codes of conduct. In addition, some foundational issues are covered, including materialist vs. Christian view of what it means to be a person. Prerequisite: last year of a computing-related program. Meets the integrative studies requirement.
  
  • CS 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, SP. Independent study of topics of interest to particular students under supervision of a member of the department staff. Open to qualified students with permission of the department chair.
  
  • CS 394 - Senior Internship in Computing

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. Interns will work 10-20 hours per week in a local business or non-profit organization under the supervision of a computing professional. The internship experience will give students the opportunity to apply skills and concepts acquired in the classroom to a supervised real-world setting. The intern will be expected to maintain a reflective journal and complete a summary paper. Interested students must contact the instructor before registering for the course. Prerequisites: CS 262  and junior standing.
  
  • CS 396 - Senior Project in Computing

    (2)
    FA. This is the first course of a two-semester sequence, in which the student will complete a department-approved computing project. This capstone experience will give students the opportunity to apply concepts and techniques learned in the classroom by developing a significant computing application. The first semester will typically focus on any necessary library research, design and prototyping, implementation and wiring should normally be done in the second semester. The student will submit regular progress reports to a supervising faculty member and submit a preliminary report on the project’s status for evaluation by a departmental committee. Prerequisite: senior class standing.
  
  • CS 398 - Senior Project in Computing II

    (2)
    SP. A continuation of CS 396. The student will submit regular progress reports to a supervising faculty member and submit a final report for evaluation by a departmental committee. Prerequisite: CS 396 .
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11Forward 10 -> 14