2020-2021 Catalog 
    
    Jan 18, 2021  
2020-2021 Catalog

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), IN (interim), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Kinesiology

  
  •  

    KIN 190 - Adapted Physical Education

    (1)
    FA, IN, SP. This course is available to students with special needs who cannot participate in other physical education/recreation classes. This course may be repeated to fulfill the health and fitness core requirements. See Kinesiology department chair for information.
  
  •  

    KIN 191 - Lifeguard Training

    (2)
    FA, IN, SP. Elective Course. The courses listed in this series are offered to meet the special interests of students. Students may select a course from this group based on interest or academic program. These courses will count toward the total graduation requirement, but will not count as core courses. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    KIN 199 - Independent Activity

    (1)
    FA, IN, SP. Elective Course. The courses listed in this series are offered to meet the special interests of students. Students may select a course from this group based on interest or academic program. These courses will count toward the total graduation requirement, but will not count as core courses.
  
  •  

    KIN 201 - Introduction to Kinesiology

    (3)
    FA, SP. An exploration of human movement in work, leisure, play, sport, fitness and similar settings. This study of personal development in, about, and through physical activity builds on a Christian understanding of the human body and the place of physical activity and personal development in the Christian life and includes biological, social and philosophical factors that affect health and wholeness in populations around the world. A gateway course designed to develop wonder and possibilities from and for professions and content areas in Kinesiology and related fields.
  
  •  

    KIN 204 - Curricular and Instructional Principles for Teaching Physical Education

    (2)
    FA, alternate years. An overview of curricular concepts, planning principles and management skills necessary for effective teaching and learning in physical education. This course is designed to give prospective teachers insights into the nature of physical education and effective instructional strategies. The course involves discussions, written assignments, research readings, observations, task teaching, and assessment applications. Prerequisite: KIN 201.
  
  •  

    KIN 212 - Anatomical Kinesiology

    (3)
    FA. A study of human motion based on structural foundations. Particular attention is given to bone, joint, muscle, connective and nerve structures, and the movement patterns specific to these structures. An analysis of efficient anatomical movement patterns for loco-motor, manipulative, and sport skills are studied in the course. Prerequisite: BIOL 205  (may be taken concurrently) or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    KIN 213 - Biomechanics

    (3)
    SP. A study of human movement based on the body’s anatomical structure and mechanical function. Includes a review of anatomical movement patterns with in-depth kinematic and kinetic analysis of loco-motor, manipulative, and sport skills. Students determine patterns of efficient movement for various sports skills based on physical and mechanical principles of human movement. Prerequisite: KIN 212 and either PHYS 221  or PHYS 223 , or permission of the instructor. The physics class may be taken concurrently with KIN 213.
  
  •  

    KIN 214 - Applied Kinesiology

    (3)
    FA. The course will study pragmatic and field based material related to human anatomy, kinesiology and biomechanics. Primary focus will be applied to the study of major muscle and joint groups as they are involved in the science of human movement. Students will be required to learn the basic neuro-anatomical structures and functions of the musculoskeletal system. Students will also learn the basic mechanical laws that govern movement and apply these principles to common movements in sport, exercise, dance, and other physical activities. Prerequisite: sophomore status and BIOL 115 .
  
  •  

    KIN 215 - Physical Education and Recreation for Persons with Disabilities

    (2)
    SP, alternate years. Philosophy and basic concepts relating to planning and conducting programs in educational and community settings for individuals with disabilities. Concepts and techniques in program planning, leadership, and adaptations of facilities, activities, equipment in physical education and recreation services for individuals with special needs are reviewed and discussed. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    KIN 216 - Medical Terminology

    (3)
    FA, SU. This fulfills the prerequisite for pre-physical therapy, pre-occupational therapy, physician’s assistant, and therapeutic recreation graduate programs. The course includes basic medical word structure, organization of the body, word parts (roots, suffixes, prefixes), medical specialties, and case reports. The course includes chapter quizzes, practice reading and writing medical records, a faith perspective paper, and a comprehensive final exam.
  
  •  

    KIN 218 - Administration of Athletics

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This survey course will introduce students to the profession of sport management and its relationship to the broader fields of physical education and recreation. The course will include an overview of the major aspects of sport management including sport facility design, sports marketing and fundraising, leadership and personnel management in sport, and sport law. Prerequisite: KIN 201.
  
  •  

    KIN 223 - Movement and Health Education in the Elementary Classroom

    (3)
    FA, SP. The course provides working knowledge of the fundamentals of health and physical education, emphasizing aspects that can be integrated into the elementary classroom. Particular attention is given to the rationale, curriculum, resource materials, and learning activities most important to elementary students. An overarching theme within the course is to examine God’s gifts of human movement and health and a Christian response to these gifts. The course is required for all elementary education students and will substitute for the physical education core requirement in the category of sport, dance, and society. Prerequisite: EDUC 102  (may be taken concurrently).
  
  •  

    KIN 240 - Cardio-respiratory Fitness Assessment, Prescription, and Leadership

    (2)
    FA. This class and lab-based course will introduce students to the methods and skills necessary for cardio-respiratory fitness (CRF) appraisal and prescription for healthy adults, as well as the principles of group and one-on-one aerobic exercise leadership. Topics include 1) risk factor identification and stratification, 2) relative contraindications to exercise testing, 3) informed consent and health questionnaires, and 4) submaximal and maximal aerobic exercise testing skills including blood pressure and heart rate. The benefits and risks of exercise testing and training, and the accepted modalities for exercise leadership will be discussed and practiced in the laboratory and both a fitness and aquatic center setting. Prerequisites: personal fitness core.
  
  •  

    KIN 241 - Muscular Fitness Assessment, Prescription, and Leadership

    (2)
    SP. This class and lab-based course will introduce students to the methods and skills necessary for muscular strength and flexibility (MSF) assessment and prescription for healthy adults, as well as the principles of strength training group leadership and individualized personal training. Topics include muscular strength, endurance, power, and flexibility assessment, 2) the benefits and risks associated with resistance training, 3) selection and prescription of appropriate resistance and flexibility training modalities based on fitness assessment, 4) common orthopedic considerations, and 5) ability to safely demonstrate and lead exercises. Students will learn to conduct a comprehensive workout to include evaluation, warm-up, training bout, cool-down, and flexibility modalities. Prerequisite: personal fitness core.
  
  •  

    KIN 243 - Sport Psychology

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This introductory course examines the ways in which psychological factors influence one’s sport performance. Research based topics include an examination of attentional styles and issues, causal attributions, motivational factors, somatic and cognitive competitive anxiety, and issues related to mood states, self-talk, self-concept and self-efficacy. This course also examines an array of research based psychological principles and skills which an individual can employ to enhance her/his motor performance. Such topics include the use of imagery, motivational strategies, goal setting, thought-stopping techniques, cognitive restructuring, methods to manage somatic and cognitive anxiety, attentional control skills, and strategies to enhance one’s self-concept and self-efficacy. Students are evaluated on in-class participation, a group or individual research project and presentation, homework assignments and written tests. Prerequisite: KIN 201.
  
  •  

    KIN 255 - Sports Medicine

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. The course covers physiological principles as they apply to physical conditioning and rehabilitation from injuries. Specific types of conditioning programs and general first aid techniques are studied. Laboratory topics include taping techniques. Prerequisite: BIOL 115 , KIN 212, or equivalent. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    KIN 302 - Sociology of Sport

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. A study of the social and social-psychological dynamics of sports in modern society. Areas receiving special attention are youth sports, interscholastic sports, and professional sports. Emphasis is put on describing and understanding sports participants, observers, and the relationship of sport as an institution to the rest of the social structure. Also offered as SOC 302 . Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    KIN 305 - Elementary Physical Activity and Development

    (3)
    FA. alternate years. A study of basic knowledge, skills, and strategies involved in the various educational activities appropriate for elementary school physical education programs. This course focuses on methods and resources for the elementary school curricula. Course includes lectures, discussions, demonstrations, laboratory teachings, student presentations, and resource material compilations. Prerequisites: KIN 204.
  
  •  

    KIN 306 - High School Physical Activity and Skill Acquisition

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course focuses on methods and resource materials appropriate for secondary school physical education programs. Coverage includes team sports, individual and dual sports, fitness building activities, recreational sports activities, and adaptive activities. The course includes lectures, discussions, demonstrations, laboratory teachings, student presentations, and compilation of resource materials. Prerequisites: KIN 204.
  
  •  

    KIN 320 - Sports Marketing and Public Relations

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course explores the breadth of the sports marketing industry and its consumer and communication realities. Students study market selection and how to plan, create, and assess sports marketing communication programs that include advertising, marketing, public relations, and new media. Prerequisites: KIN 218 or permission of instructor. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    KIN 325 - Physiology of Physical Activity

    (4)
    SP. A study of physical efficiency and physiological principles involved in human exercise. Emphasis will be placed on the responses of the respiratory, cardiovascular, and muscular systems. The course includes the physiology of factors affecting performance such as the environment and the use of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. The laboratory will help students apply principles and techniques used in assessment of physiological responses to exercise. Prerequisite: BIOL 115 , BIOL 141 , or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    KIN 328 - Advanced Practices in Exercise Science

    (3)
    FA. An in-depth survey of clinical exercise physiology, disease and disability, and practical application of prescriptive exercise throughout the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on advanced health and fitness appraisal and exercise prescription for specific populations (youth, adults, pregnancy, elderly) and disease modalities (cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular, orthopedic, immunologic). Exercise counseling and behavior strategies, as well as legal, professional, and management topics will be discussed. The course includes critique and design of research in exercise science and a personal training practicum. Prerequisites: junior standing, KIN 213  and KIN 325 , or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    KIN 332 - Philosophy of Physical Education and Sport

    (3)
    FA. Core capstone course. This course provides students with a survey of philosophical inquiry about sport and physical education. Topics include the nature of play and sport, sport as meaningful experiences, ethics in sport and physical activity, and contemporary issues such as drugs, violence, and gender. Throughout the course, students are confronted with issues from a Christian and Reformed perspective in order to develop their own Christian perspectives. Prerequisites: biblical foundations I or theological foundations I, developing a Christian mind, and philosophical foundations.
  
  •  

    KIN 346 - Field Internship

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. An internship or field experience at an approved agency, institution, or service as specified by a student’s major and advisor in kinesiology. Where applicable, the seminar focuses on the problems and issues involved in relating theory to professional practice. Prerequisite: Recreation majors must first complete all courses in the recreation program. Other kinesiology majors must have junior or senior standing. All students must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of C (2.0) and the approval of the department advisor.
  
  •  

    KIN 359 - Student Teaching Seminar

    (3)
    FA. The seminar deals with perspectives and methods of teaching physical education. This course should be taken concurrently with EDUC 346  and will provide a forum for discussion of problems and issues that develop during student teaching. Before taking this course, students must be admitted into directed teaching by the education and Kinesiology Departments. Students must complete the physical education major prior to student teaching.
  
  •  

    KIN 380 - Individual Competencies

    (1)
    FA, SP. This course assists students in the development of a portfolio documenting essential skills and experiences needed to prepare them for professional practice in the disciplines of health, physical education, recreation, and dance. Students will document their skill competence in a variety of fitness, movement/dance and sport activities, as well as document proficiency in teaching, administrative, and professional competencies.
  
  •  

    KIN 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, IN, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.
  
  •  

    KIN 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, IN, SP.
  
  •  

    KIN 391 - Honors Project and Presentation

    (1-4)
    FA, IN, SP.

Korean

  
  •  

    KOR 101 - Elementary Korean I

    (4)
    FA. An introductory course in which basic conversational and grammatical skills are taught. The course is based on a communicative approach, aiming for students to be able to communicate in Korean at a basic level and also to have a structural awareness of the language. Major cultural aspects of Korea are also studied in a Christian context. No prerequisites.
  
  •  

    KOR 102 - Elementary Korean II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of KOR 101 , the course continues to focus on basic conversational and grammatical skills. The course is based on a communicative approach, aiming for students to be able to communicate in Korean at more than a basic level and also to have a functional structural awareness of the language. Major cultural aspects of Korea are also incorporated in a Christian context throughout the course. Prerequisite: KOR 101  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    KOR 201 - Intermediate Korean I

    (4)
    FA. A continuation of KOR 102 . Continued study of Korean grammar, with equal emphasis on improving conversational proficiency and on reading and writing Korean, as well as the language as a medium for gaining insight into Korean culture. Prerequisite: KOR 102  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    KOR 202 - Intermediate Korean II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of KOR 201 . Completion of the study of basic grammar and further study of the Korean writing system, with continued emphasis on both speaking and reading. Course goals include conversational and reading comprehension and cultural understanding. Prerequisite: KOR 201  or permission of instructor.

Latin

  
  •  

    LATN 101 - Elementary Latin I

    (4)
    FA. For students who have had only one year of high school Latin or no Latin at all. The course emphasizes the essentials of grammar and a basic vocabulary with constant comparison to English. Sententiae from the principal Latin authors will be read.
  
  •  

    LATN 102 - Elementary Latin II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of LATN 101. The course emphasizes grammar and the reading of longer selections of authentic Latin dealing with Roman history and culture. Prerequisite: LATN 101 or its equivalent.
  
  •  

    LATN 201 - Intermediate Latin

    (3)
    FA. A thorough review of the essentials of grammar will accompany the reading of selected Latin prose and/or poetry. Prerequisite: two years of high school Latin or two courses of college Latin. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    LATN 205 - Latin Prose

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. Readings in a selected Roman prose author, with special emphasis on gaining reading proficiency in Latin prose. Completion of this course fulfills the core requirement in foreign language. Prerequisite: LATN 201, three years of high school Latin, or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit, depending on course content and permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    LATN 206 - Latin Poetry

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. Readings in a selected Roman poet, with special emphasis on gaining reading proficiency in Latin poetry. Completion of this course fulfills the core requirement in foreign language. Prerequisite: LATN 201, three years of high school Latin, or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit, depending on course content and permission of the instructor. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    LATN 300 - Readings in Latin Literature

    (3)
    SP. Readings from a Latin prose author and/or poet, with special emphasis on literary qualities, as illumined by critical scholarship. Completion of this course fulfills the core requirement in foreign language. May be repeated for credit, depending on course content and permission of the instructor.

Marketing

  
  •  

    MKTG 301 - Marketing

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of the principles and strategies for planning and controlling marketing programs, including the market research, product development, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, services, experiences, and values that attempts to satisfy individual and organizational needs and objectives. Includes real-world learning projects. For entry into this 300-level marketing course, students must have achieved at least a C in BUS 101 , BUS 201 , and ACCT 203 . Prerequisite: ECON 221 .
  
  •  

    MKTG 302 - Consumer Behavior

    (3)
    FA, SP. An in-depth look at the processes involved when consumers purchase and use products, study of internal and external influences for purchase, and implications for marketing research and marketing strategy. Includes real-world learning research projects. Prerequisites: MKTG 301  and STAT 143  or equivalent.
  
  •  

    MKTG 303 - Professional Selling

    (3)
    SP. This class uses a relationship selling model that builds value and benefits both the buying and selling parties. Students will learn communications skills useful in making informative and persuasive presentations. Course topics include prospecting, how to make positive first impressions, presentation skills, managing objections, negotiating, reaching win-win decisions, time management, team-selling, sales force management, and serving customers. Prerequisite: MKTG 301 .
  
  •  

    MKTG 310 - Special Topics in Marketing

    (3)
    FA, SP. A study of marketing theory, strategy, and tactics. This course is research based and includes real-world learning projects. Prerequisites: STAT 143  and MKTG 301 .
  
  •  

    MKTG 383 - External Practicum

    (1)
    FA, IN, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online. Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the department.

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MATH 071 - Calculus I Supplemental Instruction

    (1)
    FA. This course introduces students to learning theories and practices used to be successful as college learners of Calculus. Students will regularly apply theories and practices to a paired Calculus I course (MATH 171 ) to aid student learning. Many of the strategies learned will have application across content areas, but the primary focus will be on calculus and its prerequisites. Corequisite: MATH 171 .
  
  •  

    MATH 072 - Calculus II Supplemental Instruction

    (1)
    SP. This course introduces students to learning theories and practices used to be successful as college learners of Calculus. Students will regularly apply theories and practices to a paired Calculus II course (MATH 172 ) to aid student learning. Many of the strategies learned will have application across content areas, but the primary focus will be on calculus and its prerequisites. Corequisite: MATH 172 .
  
  •  

    MATH 100 - Mathematics in the Contemporary World

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introduction to the nature and variety of mathematics results and methods, mathematical models and their applications, and to the interaction between mathematics and culture. Not open to mathematics and natural science majors. Fulfills the mathematics core requirement.
  
  •  

    MATH 132 - Calculus for Management, Life, and Social Sciences

    (4)
    SP. Functions, limits, and derivatives. Applications of derivatives to maximum-minimum problems, exponential and logarithmic functions, integrals, and functions of several variables. Not open to those who have completed MATH 171 .
  
  •  

    MATH 171 - Calculus I

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course serves as an introduction to calculus. Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, applications of derivatives, and integrals. Historical and philosophical aspects of calculus are integrated with the development of the mathematical ideas, providing a sense of the context in which calculus was developed. Prerequisite: four years of college preparatory mathematics or the equivalent. A calculus readiness test is administered by the department during orientation. Fulfills the mathematics core requirement.
  
  •  

    MATH 172 - Calculus II

    (4)
    FA, SP. Techniques of integration, applications of integration, infinite sequences and series, parametric equations and polar coordinates, vectors and the geometry of space. Prerequisite: a C- or better in MATH 171 . First-year students with advanced placement credit for MATH 171  should normally enroll in section AP.
  
  •  

    MATH 190 - First-Year Seminar in Mathematics

    (1)
    FA. An introduction in seminar format to several different topics in mathematics not otherwise part of the undergraduate program. Topics vary by semester, but will include both classical and recent results and both theoretical and applied topics. The goals of the course are to acquaint students with the breadth of mathematics and to provide opportunity for students interested in mathematics to study these topics together. All first-year students interested in mathematics (regardless of prospective major program) are welcome to register. This course will be graded on a credit/no-credit basis.
  
  •  

    MATH 221 - The Real Number System and Methods for Elementary School Teachers

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course provides prospective elementary school teachers with background needed for teaching elementary mathematics. Both content and methodology relevant to school mathematics are considered. Topics covered include the real number system and its sub-systems. Pedagogical issues addressed include the nature of mathematics and of mathematics learning and the role of problem solving and the impact of technology in the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Prerequisite: EDUC 102 , may be taken concurrently. Fulfills the mathematics core requirement.
  
  •  

    MATH 222 - Geometry, Probability, Statistics, and Methods for Elementary School Teachers

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course is a continuation of MATH 221 . Both content and methodology relevant to teaching geometry, probability, and statistics in elementary school are considered. Topics covered include basic geometric concepts in two and three dimensions, transformational geometry, measurement, probability, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Pedagogical issues addressed include the place of geometry, probability, and statistics in the elementary school curriculum, use of computers in mathematics, and the development of geometric and probabilistic thinking. Prerequisite: MATH 221  or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MATH 231 - Differential Equations with Linear Algebra

    (4)
    FA, SP. An introduction to solutions and applications of first and second-order ordinary differential equations including Laplace transforms, elementary linear algebra, systems of linear differential equations, numerical methods and non-linear equations. Prerequisites: a C- or better in MATH 172 .
  
  •  

    MATH 251 - Discrete Mathematics

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to a number of topics in discrete mathematics including propositional and predicate logic, functions and sets, induction and other proof techniques, recurrences, and modular arithmetic. Prerequisites: CS 106  or CS 108  and MATH 132  or MATH 171 .
  
  •  

    MATH 252 - Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to a number of topics in discrete mathematics that are particularly useful for work in computer science including trees and graphs, counting techniques, discrete probability, and models of computation. Prerequisites: CS 106  or CS 108  and MATH 132  or MATH 171 .
  
  •  

    MATH 255 - Introductory Linear Algebra

    (4)
    FA. An introduction to mathematical reasoning and linear algebra, including applications. Prerequisites: MATH 171 .
  
  •  

    MATH 270 - An Introduction to Multivariable Calculus

    (3)
    FA. Partial derivatives, multiple integrals and vector calculus. This course consists of the first 39 class periods of MATH 271  and is intended only for engineers who cannot fit the four-hour MATH 271  into their program. Prerequisite: a C- or better in MATH 172 .
  
  •  

    MATH 271 - Multivariable Calculus

    (4)
    FA, SP. Partial derivatives, multiple integrals and vector calculus. Prerequisite: a C- or better in MATH 172 .
  
  •  

    MATH 301 - Foundations of Geometry

    (4)
    SP, even years. A study of Euclidean and hyperbolic geometries from an axiomatic viewpoint. Additional topics include transformations, geometric constructions (facilitated through software), and the construction of models for geometries. Prerequisite: MATH 255  or permission of the instructor. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    MATH 305 - The Geometry and Topology of Manifolds

    (4)
    FA, odd years. An introduction to the study of manifolds, including both the geometric topology and the differential geometry of manifolds. The emphasis is on low-dimensional manifolds, especially curves and surfaces. Topics include the topology of subsets of Euclidean space, curves and surfaces in Euclidean space, the topological classification of compact connected surfaces, smooth curves and surfaces, curvature, geodesics, the Gauss-Bonnet Theorem and the geometry of space. Prerequisites: MATH 270  or MATH 271  and MATH 231 , MATH 255  or MATH 355 . Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    MATH 312 - Logic, Computability, and Complexity

    (4)
    FA, even years. An introduction to first-order logic, computability and computational complexity. Topics covered include soundness and completeness of a formal proof system, computability and non-computability, and computational complexity with an emphasis on NP-completeness. Also listed as CS 312 . Prerequisite: either MATH 255  or both MATH 251  and MATH 252 .
  
  •  

    MATH 323 - Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary and Middle School

    (2)
    FA, SP. A discussion of the methods, pedagogy, and strategies for teaching mathematics in the elementary/middle school. Curricular issues, including discussion of various materials and the use of technology, will be tied to criteria for evaluation of such. Topics of assessment, state and national standards, and lesson development will be examined. The relationship of mathematics teaching and the Christian worldview will be discussed. Field experiences will allow students the opportunity to see the issues raised in the course in the setting of a school. Prerequisites: MATH 221 , MATH 222 , EDUC 302 .
  
  •  

    MATH 327 - Mathematics Content and Teaching Methods for Middle Grades

    (3)
    SP. This course examines best practices in the teaching and learning of mathematics for the middle grades. Relevant mathematics concepts for these grade levels will be explored. This course is generally taken during the junior year and is required for education majors seeking middle and/or high school licensure to teach mathematics. Prerequisites: EDUC 302  or EDUC 303  and a 200-level math course.
  
  •  

    MATH 331 - Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

    (4)
    FA, odd years. Qualitative study of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations and discrete time maps including stability analysis, bifurcations, fractal structures and chaos; applications to biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 231  or permission of instructor. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    MATH 333 - Partial Differential Equations

    (4)
    FA, even years. An Introduction to partial differential equations and their applications. Topics Include mathematical modeling with partial differential equations, nondimensionalization, orthogonal expansions, solution methods for linear Initial and boundary-value problems, asymptotic expansions, and numerical solution of partial differential equations. Prerequisites: MATH 231  and MATH 270  or MATH 271 .
  
  •  

    MATH 335 - Numerical Analysis

    (4)
    Offered occasionally. Theory and practice of computational procedures Including principles of error analysis and scientific computation, root-finding, polynomial Interpolation, splines, numerical Integration, applications to ordinary differential equations, computational matrix algebra, orthogonal polynomials, least square approximations, and other applications. Prerequisites: CS 104 , CS 106  or CS 108  and MATH 255 . Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    MATH 351 - Abstract Algebra

    (4)
    SP. An Introduction to abstract algebraic systems, including groups, rings, and fields, and their applications. Prerequisite: MATH 361 .
  
  •  

    MATH 355 - Advanced Linear Algebra

    (4)
    SP. Vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, inner product spaces, spectral theory, singular values and pseudoinverses, canonical forms, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 255 , or both MATH 231  and MATH 270  or MATH 271 .
  
  •  

    MATH 359 - Seminar in Secondary Teaching of Mathematics

    (3)
    FA. A course in perspectives on, principles of, and practices in the teaching of mathematics on the secondary level. This course must be taken concurrently with EDUC 346 . The seminar provides a forum for the discussion of concerns that develop during directed teaching.
  
  •  

    MATH 361 - Real Analysis I

    (4)
    FA. The real number system, sets and cardinality, the topology of the real numbers, numerical sequences and series, real functions, continuity, differentiation, and Riemann Integration. Prerequisites: two mathematics courses numbered 231 or above.
  
  •  

    MATH 362 - Real Analysis II

    (4)
    SP, alternate years. A continuation of MATH 361 . Topics from sequences and series of functions, measure theory, and Lebesgue integration. Prerequisite: MATH 361 . Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    MATH 365 - Complex Variables

    (4)
    SP. Complex numbers, complex functions, integration and the Cauchy integral formula, power series, residues and poles, and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MATH 270  or MATH 271 .
  
  •  

    MATH 380 - Perspectives on Modern Mathematics

    (3)
    SP, odd years. This course explores the historical development of some of the basic concepts of modern mathematics. It includes an examination of significant issues and controversies, philosophical perspectives, and problems on which mathematicians have focused throughout history. Prerequisites: MATH 361 , biblical foundations I or theological foundations I, developing a Christian mind and philosophical foundations.
  
  •  

    MATH 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, IN, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Math department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Math department. 

  
  •  

    MATH 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, IN, SP. Independent study of topics of interest to particular students under supervision of a member of the department staff. Open to qualified students with permission of the department chair.
  
  •  

    MATH 391 - Colloquium

    (0)
    FA, SP. Meets weekly for an hour for the presentation of various topics in Mathematics, computer science, and related disciplines by students, faculty, and visiting speakers. Prerequisites: two 200-level courses in mathematics.
  
  •  

    MATH 395 - Senior Thesis in Mathematics

    (1-4)
    FA, IN, SP. The course requirements include an expository or research paper and an oral presentation on a selected topic in mathematics. Open to qualified students with the permission of the chair.

Ministry Leadership (Handlon Campus)

  
  •  

    ML 101 - Old Testament Survey

    (3)
    This course prepares leaders in the church to be faithful and effective stewards of the Word by acquainting them with the basic content and principal theme of each book of the Old Testament; the historical, geographical, and cultural backgrounds to the Old Testament; its introductory hermeneutical principles; and its continuing relevance. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 102 - New Testament Survey

    (3)
    This course prepares leaders in the church to be faithful and effective stewards of the Word by acquainting them with the basic content and principal theme of each book of the New Testament; the historical, geographical, and cultural backgrounds to the New Testament; its introductory hermeneutical principles; and its continuing relevance. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 111 - Church in Historical Context I

    (3)
    An introduction to the historical context of Christianity from 100-1300 A.D. The emphasis of this history course will be the social, cultural, political, and religious contexts of Christianity and the ways in which the thought, practices, and institutions of Christians were shaped by and responded to various contexts. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 112 - Church in Historical Context II

    (3)
    An introduction to Christianity in its historical context from the late Middle Ages to the present, with special attention to developments in Europe and North America. The course focuses on the global expansion of Christianity during the last 700 years and on the question of how the church’s institutions, thought, and practice were shaped by and responded to their various contexts. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 121 - Christian Formation

    (3)
    The process of spiritual formation is intentionally engaged so that habits developed throughout students’ theological education will form them for ministry. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 122 - Practice of Discipleship

    (3)
    Jesus commands his followers to make disciples. In this course, learners will explore how to assess ministry contexts and how to use Christian practices and various forms of teaching to make 21st-century disciples. The course will include opportunities to practice these skills. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 202 - Old Testament Narrative Literature

    (3)

    This course explores the form and content of Old Testament narrative literature in the books of Genesis through Kings, Chronicles, Ezra-Nehemiah, and Esther. Particular attention will be paid to the literary artistry, theological themes, and canonical shaping/context of each book and select passages from each book with a goal to developing the skills and knowledge required for faithful interpretation and proclamation of Old Testament narrative texts. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101

  
  •  

    ML 203 - Psalms and Wisdom Literature

    (3)
    This course explores the form and content of Psalms and Wisdom literature in the books of Proverbs, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, and Job. Particular attention will be paid to the literary artistry, theological themes, and canonical shaping/context of each book and select passages from each book with a goal to developing the skills and knowledge required for faithful interpretation and proclamation of Old Testament psalms and wisdom literature. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101
  
  •  

    ML 205 - New Testament Narratives

    (3)


    A study of the Gospels and Acts. Students develop an exegetical method through an

    analysis and critique of the various approaches to the gospels, they sharpen their exegetical skills through the study of specific periscopes, and they learn to teach and

    proclaim the meaning of New Testament narratives today. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 102

  
  •  

    ML 206 - New Testament Letters

    (3)
    A review of the basic principles of interpreting the biblical text (i.e., hermeneutics) as they apply to the New Testament letters. Special attention is given to the grammar, historical context, social setting, epistolary structure, and theological themes of the New Testament letters as well as their message for the church today. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 102
  
  •  

    ML 207 - New Testament I

    (4)
    An introduction to the basic elements of New Testament Greek, with an emphasis on the mastery of forms, basic vocabulary and syntax. Lecture
  
  •  

    ML 211 - Theology of the Holy Spirit

    (3)
    An overview of the ongoing work and ministry of the Holy Spirit in the church for the advancement of God’s Kingdom. Students will explore the work of the Holy Spirit in both the Old and New Testaments, giving special attention to the Spirit’s work of equipping believers for fruitful witness and effective fulfillment of Jesus’ great commission. This practical theology course will look closely at the various means of grace made available to prepare for spiritual battle and equip the church for ministry, with an emphasis on personal preparation for spiritual leadership in prison. Lecture Prerequisites: REL 131, ML 101, and ML 102 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 221 - Foundations for Pastoral Care

    (3)
    This course will aid students in constructing a biblical, theological, and practical framework for understanding and implementing pastoral care. Students will begin to formulate and embrace their own pastoral identity and to create a foundational corpus of skills and competencies that address various modes of pastoral care. The pastoral skills and competencies that are addressed in this course will assist students in developing contextual perspective, understanding the complexities of human experience, and appropriating theological and biblical perspectives, all in the service of providing effective pastoral care within a relational paradigm. Lecture Prerequisites: REL 131, ML 101, ML 102, ML 121, and ML 122 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 222 - Forgiveness and Reconciliation

    (3)
    Forgiveness and reconciliation are key elements in a Christian’s relationships with God and other people. This course addresses not only the relationship between God’s forgiving us and our forgiving others, but also ways in which forgiveness and reconciliation are related to repentance, confession, restitution, and justice. Lecture Prerequisites: REL 131, ML 101, ML 102 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 307 - New Testament Greek II

    (4)
    This course continues the study of the basics of Biblical Greek. The teaching includes an introduction to Greek grammar, vocabulary, and syntax and then introduces the student to the reading of the Greek New Testament. Emphasis is given to the use of Bible software as well as the exegetical application of Greek tenses and moods, adverbial participles, and conditional sentences to exegesis. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 207
  
  •  

    ML 311 - Apologetics

    (3)
    The course is an introduction to Christian apologetics as an aspect of ministry. It first considers the relation of revelation, faith, and rationality. It then responds to major challenges to the existence and nature of God, the place of evil in God’s providence and redemption, God’s supernatural action in nature and history, the credibility of Scripture’s witness to Jesus Christ, and salvation through Christ alone. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102 and REL 131 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 312 - Theologizing Violence

    (3)
    Violence is a problem of profound significance in the world today and it presents a unique challenge to the Christian Church in its mission to proclaim and live the gospel. Through engaging selected readings and films, this theology seminar examines various types of violence (i.e. racialized, military, domestic, etc.) to gain insight into how violence shapes and threatens individuals, communities and the world around us. One primary goal of the course is to better understand the kinds of theological claims that Christians can and should make in response to a world that continues to be plagued by violence. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102, REL 131, and CMS 151 or permission of program director
  
  •  

    ML 321 - Forming Worshiping Communities

    (3)
    An introduction to the principles and practices of vital and faithful worship leadership. The course explores biblical and historical perspectives on worship practices and gives students practice at several basic worship planning and leading skills. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102, and REL 131 or permission of the program director.
  
  •  

    ML 322 - Pastoral Disciplines for Counseling

    (3)
    This course prepares students for the identity of pastoral counselor and task of pastoral counseling within the context of the faith community. Special attention will be given to various concrete human experiences that the pastor may encounter in the counseling function, how the personhood of the pastor influences the counseling encounter, appropriate boundaries, and how the counseling ministry is conceived in relation to the broader community and other secular entities outside of the church context. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 221
  
  •  

    ML 323 - Leadership in Ministry

    (3)
    Equips students to provide effective pastoral leadership in forming communities of disciples, and integrates a biblical theology of leadership with personal reflection, discernment of contexts, and practical leadership skills. Lecture Prerequisites: Final year in one’s program or permission of the program director.
  
  •  

    ML 324 - Missional Ministry and Evangelism

    (3)
    This course will examine how the mission of the church relates to all ministry practices. Students will learn how to talk effectively and pastorally about the faith and how to teach others to do the same. Students will learn practical skills for building relationships with people and presenting the gospel in culturally appropriate ways, conducting evangelistic Bible studies, and discipling new believers. Lecture Prerequisites: ML 101, ML 102, REL 131 and ML 122 or permission of the program director
  
  •  

    ML 325 - Preaching Theory and Method

    (3)
    This class will introduce the student to the practice of preaching through a series of lectures, discussions, readings, and preparatory exercises. The student will be taught an approach to preaching that will provide both a grammar for talking about sermons, and a rudimentary method for sermon construction. Lecture Prerequisites: : ML 101, ML 102, REL 131 and ML 122 or permission of the program director
 

Page: 1 <- 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13