2020-2021 Catalog 
    
    Dec 01, 2022  
2020-2021 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), IN (interim), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Religion: Seminars

  
  •  

    REL 357 - Religion and Education Seminar

    (3)
    A seminar in perspectives, principles, and practices in the teaching of religion on the secondary level. This course addresses a wide range of pedagogical issues that confront the teacher of biblical, theological, and religious materials in secondary teaching and requires a major curriculum project. Prerequisite: EDUC 302/EDUC 303 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    REL 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, IN, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Religion department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Religion department. 

  
  •  

    REL 396 - Religion Seminar

    (3)
    SP. An advanced seminar for senior majors in religion and other qualified students. This course considers significant issues in biblical, theological, and religious studies and requires a major research paper. Prerequisites: senior status, and for non-majors, three electives in religion and permission of the instructor.

Science Education Studies

  
  •  

    SCES 120 - Scientific Models and Reasoning

    (4)
    FA. This course examines fundamental life, physical, and earth science models alongside the development of scientific reasoning. Major themes and topics include scientific modeling, the particulate nature of matter, scientific problem solving, the nature of science, and the relationship between science and the Christian faith. Students will also study scientific models for learning to inform and refine their study skills as they transition to college. This Natural World core course is seamlessly integrated with First-Year Seminar and is intended for first-year students only. Corequisite: IDIS 149 . Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    SCES 121 - The Content and Nature of Science for Elementary Teachers

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course uses an inquiry-based approach to integrate relevant life, physical, and earth & space science content and an examination of the nature of science for elementary teachers. The course goal is to provide prospective teachers with a portion of the content knowledge, inquiry skills, and understandings of the nature of science needed to effectively teach inquiry-based science in elementary school. Major themes and topics covered include scientific models, the particulate nature of matter, the cellular nature of living things, scientific problem solving, the nature of science, and the relationship between science and the Christian faith.
  
  •  

    SCES 122 - Science Content and Skills for Elementary Teachers

    (4)
    FA, SP. This course is the continuation of an inquiry-based investigation of relevant life, physical, and earth & space science content and scientific inquiry skills for elementary teachers. The course goal is to provide prospective teachers with a portion of the content knowledge and inquiry skills needed to effectively teach inquiry-based science from a Christian perspective. Major themes and topics covered include energy and systems, energy and interactions, changing earth and life forms, genetics, scientific testing and investigations, and the relationship between science and the Christian faith. Throughout the course a perspective of respect for God’s creation, Christian stewardship, and the structure of God’s creation is presented as the purpose and motivation for investigating nature and learning science. Prerequisites: SCES 120 or SCES 121 or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    SCES 214 - Communication and Learning in the Natural Sciences

    (3)
    IN. This course provides a systematic examination of communication and teaching strategies for natural science at the middle and high school level, including oral exposition, visual imagery, demonstrations, technology, and laboratory activities. Theoretical components include the underlying educational theories, scientific literacy, and the unifying themes and practices in science. Practical components include methodologies for assessment, lesson and unit development, laboratory safety, and student presentations and response. Prerequisite: At least three courses in natural science.
  
  •  

    SCES 312 - Teaching Science in Elementary and Middle School

    (3)
    IN, alternate years. A consideration of the methods, pedagogies, and strategies associated with teaching science in elementary and middle school. Curricular resources for teaching science, including the use of technology and written materials, are also examined with consideration of the criteria for their evaluation. Additional topics include assessment, benchmarks and standards, and lesson and unit development. The relationship of Christian faith to the teaching of science in the classroom is also examined. Field experiences during normal course hours are included. This course fulfills all the same requirements as SCES 313 but is intended for integrated science minors and majors. Prerequisites: EDUC 302  and at least four science courses or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    SCES 313 - Science Teaching in Elementary and Middle School

    (2)
    FA, SP. A consideration of the methods, pedagogies, and strategies associated with teaching science in elementary and middle school. Curricular resources for teaching science, including the use of technology and written materials, are also examined with consideration of the criteria for their evaluation. Additional topics include assessment, benchmarks and standards, and lesson and unit development. The relationship of Christian faith to the teaching of science in the classroom is also examined. Field experiences during normal course hours are included. Prerequisites: EDUC 302  and at least one science course.
  
  •  

    SCES 314 - Integration Methods and Pedagogies for Secondary Science Teachers

    (2)
    SP, alternate years. This course explores the integration of the natural science disciplines, issues related to the nature of science, and the methods and pedagogies used in secondary science teaching. Theoretical components include a study of the cross-disciplinary nature of science and relevant educational theories impacting the role of the teacher and students in diverse science classroom settings. Practical components include methodologies for lesson and teacher development and assessment, curriculum planning, laboratory development, and classroom management. Prerequisite: SCES 214. Prior completion of EDUC 302 -EDUC 303  is recommended.
  
  •  

    SCES 359 - Seminar in Secondary Teaching of Integrated Science

    (3)
    FA. A course in perspectives on, principles of, and practice in the teaching of the natural sciences at the middle school and secondary level. Included are classroom management strategies, the role of the teacher, curriculum studies, readings in science education, and self-assessment strategies. This class is taken concurrently with EDUC 346 , allowing students the opportunity to reflect on science education while engaging in classroom practice.
  
  •  

    SCES 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, IN, SP, SU. This course provides the opportunity for a student to conduct research or independent work under the direction of a science education studies advisor. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the faculty member directing the project. The requirements for credit are determined by the supervising faculty member in collaboration with the student.
  
  •  

    SCES 525 - Alternative Frameworks and Conceptual Change in the Science Classroom

    (3)
    SU. This course examines the nature of alternative frameworks and their correct or incorrect categorization as misconceptions, the process of conceptual change, and teaching strategies conducive towards promoting conceptual change in the science classroom. Course readings and discussions expose students to the intricacies and influence of students’ prior conceptions on science learning and the process of conceptual change. Application of course content occurs as students develop lesson plans that address common science misconceptions. Prerequisites: At least one science methods course at the undergraduate or graduate level. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    SCES 526 - Teaching the Nature of Science

    (3)
    SU. This course presents historical, philosophical, sociological and psychological interpretations of the nature of science, its implications for scientific literacy, and methodologies related to implementation in the science classroom. Through discussions, readings, and scientific activities/investigations, students will experience and consider how teachers, textbooks, and science curricula both accurately and inaccurately portray science. Students will also modify and develop lesson plans in order to more accurately represent and teach the nature of science to students. Prerequisites: At least one science methods course at the undergraduate or graduate level. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    SCES 527 - Scientific Reasoning and Teaching Inquiry

    (3)
    SU. This course investigates the role of scientific reasoning and inquiry in science, the natural development of those skills and strategies in children, and effective teaching methodologies and considerations for developing scientific reasoning and inquiry skills in students. Students explore the connections between scientific reasoning and scientific content and the transference of reasoning and critical thinking skills across the content domains of science and everyday life. Students practice their own reasoning and inquiry skills in the context of K-12 science activities and also develop lessons to foster scientific reasoning and inquiry in their own students. Prerequisites: At least one science methods course at the undergraduate or graduate level. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    SCES 590 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, IN, SP, SU. This course provides the opportunity for a student to conduct research or independent work under the direction of a science education studies advisor. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the faculty member directing the project. The requirements for credit are determined by the supervising faculty member in collaboration with the student.

Social Work

  
  •  

    SOWK 240 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

    (3)
    FA, SP. Students will discover what it means to be a professional social worker in this course. With attention to the importance of diversity, history, and the experiences of at-risk populations, students will explore the range of social services and advocacy opportunities for work with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations. This will include an exploration of several areas of practice, such as poverty and inequality, housing and homelessness, family and child welfare, health and health care, disability, mental health, substance use, and criminal justice. Students will approach social issues from a strengths-based and systems-based view of persons in their environment.
  
  •  

    SOWK 250 - Diversity and Inequality in the United States

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course analyzes the social meanings of our various identities (i.e., race-ethnicity, class, and gender), how these identities affect our self-concepts, and the impact of these identities upon our social and societal relationships. The primary objectives of this course are to study the social definitions of gender, race, and class, to examine the impact of these social constructs on human behavior, identity, and interactions with other persons, to develop a sociological understanding of the nature of structured inequality, and patterns of discrimination, to become familiar with social-scientific methods appropriate for the studying of diversity and inequality, and to understand the promise and challenge of biblical reconciliation for seeing ourselves as image bearers of God and for easing the social tensions associated with diversity and inequality in the United States.
  
  •  

    SOWK 255 - Social Science Statistics

    (4)
    FA, SP. Students will be introduced to social statistics and statistical analysis software as a tool for social research. Throughout the course, students will learn theoretical statistical concepts as well as skills to perform data analysis. Students will analyze data and present findings to develop skills as a critical consumer of statistics, with an emphasis on developing virtuous practice in the ethical use of statistics. This course fulfills the Mathematics core category for social work majors. Corequisite: SOWK 255L.
  
  •  

    SOWK 260 - Global Issues and Perspectives

    (3)
    FA, SP. Students will understand the history and practice of global social work, with a particular focus on human rights and development. Using a framework of social exclusion, students will look critically at specific social justice issues facing the global community and the field of international social work such as international migration, human trafficking, international adoption, world poverty, and public health. Students will advance their understanding of global issues and their impact on practice and policy at all levels. This course fulfills the global and historical core.
  
  •  

    SOWK 350 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course involves a study of persons in their environment with a particular focus on human behavior and development. Persons are described as biological, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual beings who grow and develop throughout their lives. Theoretical frameworks enable students to assess, predict, and explain micro, meso, exo, and macro influences on human behavior and development. Prerequisites for social work majors only: BIOL 115 ; PSYC 151  or SOC 151 ; and SOWK 240 .
  
  •  

    SOWK 355 - Social Research

    (3)
    FA, SP. Students develop an understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods in the social sciences. In collaboration with community partners, students conduct a research project by describing a social issue and developing research questions, conducting a literature review, selecting appropriate methods, collecting and analyzing data, and communicating results to a vested community audience. Students consider implications of social research findings for practice and policy. Through the course, students develop an awareness of the importance of social science research as a means to understand ourselves and the world around us. Prerequisite: SOC 255  or SOWK 255 .
  
  •  

    SOWK 360 - Social Welfare Policy Analysis

    (3)
    FA, SP. A value-critical analysis and evaluation of social welfare policies and programs as responses to defined social problems in their historical, political, and economic contexts. Students examine the role of the direct provider of social services as a policy practitioner. Prerequisites for social work majors and minors only: PSYC 151  or SOC 151 ; SOWK 240 .
  
  •  

    SOWK 370 - The Helping Interview

    (3)
    FA, SP. Through experiential work in a laboratory setting, students will learn the skills to conduct a solutions-focused helping interview. Students will conduct several types of recorded interviews, participate as role-players, and provide constructive feedback to peers. Students will also engage contextual material about ethical issues, a Christian view of relationship, and the importance of diversity and difference. Prerequisites for social work majors and minors only: PSYC 151  or SOC 151 ; and SOWK 240 .
  
  •  

    SOWK 371 - Generalist Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups

    (4)
    FA. Students will develop competencies in advanced generalist social work practice with individuals. Students develop skills in engagement, assessment, intervention, evaluation and termination within a problem-solving context. Special attention is given to integrating issues of diversity and inclusion into practice, and to competent and ethical documentation. Prerequisite: SOWK 370 .
  
  •  

    SOWK 372 - Generalist Practice with Organizations and Communities

    (3)
    FA, SP. Students will develop competencies in advanced generalist practice with organizations and communities, with an emphasis on how social workers engage, assess, plan, implement, and evaluate change at the macro level.  Students will examine the historical roots of social work in macro practice and the social gospel. Students will deepen their understanding of the profession’s ethical commitments to economic, social, and environmental justice, and to anti-oppressive models of trauma-informed community practice that build off individual strengths and community assets. Prerequisites for social work majors and minors only: PSYC 151  or SOC 151 ; and SOWK 240 .
  
  •  

    SOWK 373 - Generalist Practice with Groups and Families

    (3)
    SP. Students will develop competencies in advanced generalist practice with groups and families. Students will learn skills to effectively lead a group, paying attention to group dynamics and necessary leadership skills. Students will practice engagement, assessment, intervention, evaluation and termination with groups and families. The course highlights the need to understand and respect groups with diverse backgrounds including (but not limited to) race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental ability, age, and national origin. Prerequisite: SOWK 370 . Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    SOWK 380 - Social Work Field Education

    (5, 10)
    FA, IN, SP. Students will integrate academic learning into social work practice through the completion of a 400-hour social work field education experience paired with a weekly professional seminar. The professional seminar will allow students to process their field experiences. Students will apply areas of social work content to experiences in the field, including professionalism, the planned change process, social policy, human diversity, and professional ethics. Within the field setting, students will interact with client systems at the individual, family, group, community, and organizational levels, and will process these interactions with their peers in the professional seminar. Prerequisite: admission to the BSW program and field education.
  
  •  

    SOWK 381 - Social Work Capstone

    (4)
    Students will integrate the content of their courses in the social work major and a Christian worldview. Students draw on core values and principles from the profession and from the Christian faith as they discuss issues associated with professional role and identity. Prerequisite for social work majors and minors only: SOWK 240 .
  
  •  

    SOWK 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, IN, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.

      Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Social Work department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Social Work department. 

  
  •  

    SOWK 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)

Sociology

  
  •  

    SOC 130 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    (3)
    FA. This course involves the study of cultural diversity around the globe, both historically and geographically. The course introduces the foundational elements of cultural anthropology including topics of field work, cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, participant observation, ethnography, ethnology as well as major anthropological theories. The course addresses the diversity, as well as commonality of cultural systems, both in time and space, through studying major components of cultural systems, such as kinship, religion, politics, and economics. Students are exposed to an awareness of their place within a particular cultural context, as well as their culture’s place within a global and historical context.
  
  •  

    SOC 151 - Sociological Principles and Perspectives

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course is an introductory study of human social activity. The primary objectives of the course are: 1) to introduce students to origins, basic concepts, theories, and research methods of sociology, 2) to provide students with an overview of the structure, effects, promise, and limitations of our most basic social institutions, 3) to provide students with an overview of the nature of social organization, 4) to encourage students to think analytically and critically about the society in which they live, and 5) to introduce students to the traditions of Christian reflection on social life.
  
  •  

    SOC 201 - The Family

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. An intensive culturally comparative and historical analysis of the family as an institution. The contemporary courtship, marriage, and divorce patterns of the American family are also discussed.
  
  •  

    SOC 202 - Urban Sociology

    (3)
    SP. This course is an introduction to the purposes, problems, and prospects of cities in the United States and in other parts of the world. The theoretical portion of the course will introduce basic concepts of urban ecology and urban political economy. In the applied portion, functionalism and conflict theory will be addressed to help students to understand the interaction of social factors that produce change in cities and suburbs. The transformational theology of Abraham Kuyper will be used to focus a Christian perspective.
  
  •  

    SOC 203 - Sociology of Deviance

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. An analysis of deviant behavior: its causes, manifestations, prevention, and programs of control. Special attention is given to the role of social norms in generating as well as controlling deviance. Emphasis is put on ways in which social structures generate and label deviance. Implications are drawn for various institutions, particularly the school and the church.
  
  •  

    SOC 231 - Intercultural Communication

    (3)
    FA. An examination of the anthropological principles relating to cross-cultural communication. This examination requires an extensive comparison of the components of cultural systems and the nature of cultural dynamics. The areas of application include government, business, Peace Corps, development, and mission work, with special emphasis on the last two. Special topics include developing an appropriate attitude regarding indigenous cultures and the management of culture shock. Also cross-listed as COMM 231  .
  
  •  

    SOC 250 - Diversity and Inequality in the United States

    (3)
    FA, SP. This course analyzes the social meanings of our various identities (i.e., race-ethnicity, class, and gender), how these identities affect our self-concepts, and the impact of these identities upon our social and societal relationships. The primary objectives of this course are to study the social definitions of gender, race, and class, to examine the impact of these social constructs on human behavior, identity, and interactions with other persons, to develop a sociological understanding of the nature of structured inequality, and patterns of discrimination, to become familiar with social-scientific methods appropriate for the studying of diversity and inequality, and to understand the promise and challenge of biblical reconciliation for seeing ourselves as image bearers of God and for easing the social tensions associated with diversity and inequality in the United States.
  
  •  

    SOC 255 - Social Science Statistics

    (4)
    FA, SP. Students will be introduced to social statistics and statistical analysis software as a tool for social research. Throughout the course, students will learn theoretical statistical concepts as well as skills to perform data analysis. Students will analyze data and present findings to develop skills as a critical consumer of statistics, with an emphasis on developing virtuous practice in the ethical use of statistics. This course fulfills the Mathematics core category for social work majors. Corequisite: SOC 255L.
  
  •  

    SOC 301 - Gender and Sexuality in the United States

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. This course provides a sociological understanding of the concepts of gender and sexuality by focusing on how their socially constructed nature provides insight into gender and sexuality identities, roles, expression, and experiences. Students will critically and analytically consider how structural forces, cultures, and major social institutions (e.g., media, work) produce, govern, mediate, shape, and perpetuate inequalities among people based on gender and sexuality in the U.S.
  
  •  

    SOC 302 - Sociology of Sport

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. A study of the social and social-psychological dynamics of sports in modern society. Areas receiving special attention are youth sports, interscholastic sports, and professional sports. Emphasis is put on describing and understanding sports participants and observers and the relationship of sport as an institution to the rest of social structure. Also offered as KIN 302 .
  
  •  

    SOC 303 - Criminology

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course uses sociological theories, frameworks, and methods to understand criminal behavior. It explores how crime is defined, enforced, and measured, as well as motivational and demographic trends in criminal behavior. Students will use this information to critically and analytically consider ethics, policy, and research implications and issues.
  
  •  

    SOC 304 - Religion and Society

    (3)
    FA, alternate years. The course will focus on recognizing the social aspects of religion and thinking critically about what influences the ways in which people practice their faith and what role faith plays in shaping human behavior. Particular attention is paid to the North American experience of Christianity. This course will examine beliefs, practices, organizations, and cultures from a sociological perspective, looking as well at the historical and philosophical underpinnings of the perspective and what that means for our study of religion.
  
  •  

    SOC 305 - Special Topics

    (3)
    FA, SP. Advanced study of selected topics of current interest in sociology or anthropology. Topics vary and may be substantive, theoretical, or methodological. Consult instructor for course information. This course may be repeated for credit; the topic may not be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    SOC 330 - Anthropology of Religion

    (3)
    SP, alternate years. This course takes a comparative approach to the study of religion - focusing on the universal characteristics of religious beliefs such as myth, ritual, and the sacred. Students will develop a critical understanding of the approach anthropology takes to the study of religion and will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of that approach particularly from a faith perspective. Emphasis will also be given to grappling with the reality of personal faith in a global context of religious diversity, including the diversity in expression of Christianity.
  
  •  

    SOC 351 - Sociological Theory

    (3)
    FA. An assessment of sociological theory in terms of its historical development and current role in understanding human behavior. Particular attention is given to the function of theory in the research process. Direction is given to the student in the formulation of sociological hypotheses from data. Prerequisite: SOC 151 .
  
  •  

    SOC 355 - Social Research

    (3)
    FA, SP. Students develop an understanding of quantitative and qualitative research methods in the social sciences. In collaboration with community partners, students conduct a research project by describing a social issue and developing research questions, conducting a literature review, selecting appropriate methods, collecting and analyzing data, and communicating results to a vested community audience. Students consider implications of social research findings for practice and policy. Through the course, students develop an awareness of the importance of social science research as a means to understand ourselves and the world around us. Prerequisite: SOC 255  or SOWK 255 
  
  •  

    SOC 380 - Internship in Sociology

    (3)
    SP. Students are placed in an internship setting related to an area of sociological practice or research. Students work eight hours per week under the direction of an on-site supervisor and participate in regular seminar meetings conducted by the university instructor. Internship experiences will assist students in integrating previously acquired sociological knowledge and research skills in a particular setting. Each student will author a project that communicates learning throughout the internship. Prerequisites: Senior sociology major, completion of SOC 151 , SOC 255 , and completion of or concurrent registration in SOC 351  and SOC 355 .
  
  •  

    SOC 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, IN, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.

       

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in Sociology department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Sociology department. 

  
  •  

    SOC 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
  
  •  

    SOC 391 - Ethnography

    (3)
    FA. This course introduces students to a sociological perspective on everyday social settings by applying methods of systematic, qualitative observation. Training includes ethnographic research methodologies designed to equip students to collect and analyze data. Topics include issues of access, rapport, participant observation, field notes, ethics, interviewing, coding, and analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 355 .
  
  •  

    SOC 395 - Sociology Integrative Seminar

    (3)
    SP. This course provides students with an opportunity to re-visit, at a more advanced level, the basic assumptions and concepts of the discipline of sociology, to explore the bearing of Christian faith, in particular a Reformed perspective, on the shaping of scholarly research, to consider what it means to practice sociology, and, in addition, students are challenged to synthesize, integrate, and assess what they have learned in sociology and to reflect on the role and contributions of the discipline in understanding current social issues in American culture. Prerequisites: biblical foundations I or theological foundations I, developing a Christian mind, philosophical foundations, SOC 151 , SOC 255 , and SOC 351 .

Spanish: Core Language Courses

  
  •  

    SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

    (4)
    FA. An introductory course in oral and written Spanish.
  
  •  

    SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

    (4)
    SP. A continuation of SPAN 101.
  
  •  

    SPAN 121 - Intermediate Spanish

    (4)
    FA. A two-course sequence (SPAN 121-122) during the fall semester and January interim designed for students who have had two years of Spanish in high school, but who are not sufficiently prepared for SPAN 201. These students take SPAN 202 in the spring to finish the foreign language core requirement.
  
  •  

    SPAN 122 - Intermediate Spanish

    (3)
    IN. A two-course sequence (SPAN 121-122) during the fall semester and January interim designed for students who have had two years of Spanish in high school, but who are not sufficiently prepared for SPAN 201. These students take SPAN 202 in the spring to finish the foreign language core requirement.
  
  •  

    SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I

    (4)
    FA, SU. Review of essential grammatical structures and further training in spoken and written Spanish. Cultural and literary readings. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or equivalent.
  
  •  

    SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II

    (4)
    SP, SU. This final core class is a continuation of SPAN 201 or SPAN 121-SPAN 122.
  
  •  

    SPAN 203 - Accelerated Intermediate Spanish

    (4)
    FA. This is a final core course in Spanish and is preparation for courses in the Spanish major or minor. It is intended specifically for students who have successfully completed at least three years of high school Spanish. The course includes an accelerated review of essential structures and vocabulary, and also features aspects of culture, and classroom and community opportunities to use spoken Spanish. Students explore relevant biblical themes and see examples of faith practice in the Hispanic World.

Spanish: Language and Linguistics Courses

  
  •  

    SPAN 301 - Advanced Grammar, Composition and Conversation I

    (3)
    FA, SP. This introduction and gateway to the major or minor concentration focuses on the improvement of speaking and writing skills through vocabulary acquisition and the honing of grammatical accuracy. Extensive practice in oral and written communication. A minimum grade of C (2.0) in Spanish 301 is required as a prerequisite for any concentration in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202, SPAN 203 or equivalent.
  
  •  

    SPAN 302 - Advanced Grammar, Composition and Conversation II

    (3)
    FA, SP. A continuation of SPAN 301.
  
  •  

    SPAN 340 - Spanish Phonology and Dialectology

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to Spanish linguistics, concentrating on the sounds of Spanish (phonetics and phonology), with appropriate pronunciation practice and contrasts with English pronunciation. Included are units on the history of the Spanish language and the major dialects spoken today. Prerequisite: SPAN 301.
  
  •  

    SPAN 341 - Spanish Syntax and Sociolinguistics

    (3)
    SP. An examination of the differences and similarities between English and Spanish morphology, syntax, and semantics, in order to improve students’ communication skills and to generate a deeper understanding of the complex nature of the human language system. Specific connections will be made to first and second language acquisition, bilingualism, Spanish/English dialects, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. Prerequisite: SPAN 302.

Spanish: Culture and Literature Courses

  
  •  

    SPAN 300 - Introduction to College-Level Spanish Studies

    (3)
    FA. In this course, dual-enrolled Spanish immersion students learn about pan-Latino identity and globalization and develop the skills needed to succeed in college-level studies, with an emphasis on the development of their academic writing skills. This course gives special attention given to the effects of globalization on Spanish speakers from Central and South America and Spain. Prerequisites: Students must be a junior or senior high school student in an approved Spanish immersion program. Students must also have achieved a score of 3 or better on the Spanish Language and Culture AP exam. Corequisite: Students must be enrolled in an approved high school Spanish immersion program.
  
  •  

    SPAN 308 - Introduction to the Hispanic World I

    (3)
    FA. This course introduces students to major developments of the Hispanic World from antiquity through the Enlightenment. Discussions center on the relationship of major literary and artistic works to economic, political, religious, and social developments in the Iberian Peninsula and the Castilian colonies in the Americas. This course, normally the first in a sequence of two, prepares students for advanced-topics courses. An oral presentation and a research paper are required. Prerequisite: SPAN 301. (Global and Historical Studies core)
  
  •  

    SPAN 309 - Introduction to the Hispanic World II

    (3)
    SP. This course introduces students to major developments of the Hispanic World from the independence of the Spanish American colonies to the present day. Discussions center on the relationship of major literary and artistic works to economic, political, religious, and social developments in Spain and Spanish America. In addition, students develop their skills in reading and evaluating literature in a second language through representative texts, and they sharpen their skills in critical writing and analysis. This course, normally the second course in a sequence of two, prepares students for advanced-level culture and literature courses. Oral presentations and research paper are required. Prerequisite: SPAN 308, or permission of the instructor. (Literature core)
  
  •  

    SPAN 310 - Hispanic Culture in the United States

    (3)
    SP. A study of the history and culture of Hispanic groups in the United States, their political, social, and religious institutions, and their value systems. The course is designed to assist students in understanding the cultural contributions of Hispanics within the broader U.S. culture. Reading materials include literary and non-literary sources. This course has the option of fulfilling cross-cultural engagement (CCE) core with additional course work and permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: SPAN 301.
  
  •  

    SPAN 370 - Advanced Topics

    (3)
    FA, SP. Through varied disciplinary emphases and diverse media such as film, music, art, written text, and community contact, this course fosters a deeper understanding of a specific theme relevant to the Hispanic World. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 308 or SPAN 309. Students may repeat this course if the topic is different.
  
  •  

    SPAN 390 - Independent Study

    (1-4)
    FA, IN, SP, SU. Prerequisite: Permission of the department chair.
  
  •  

    SPAN 395 - Palabra y mundo: The Word and the World

    (3)
    FA, SP. As the capstone in the Spanish departmental major, this integrative studies course provides an opportunity for students to revisit, at a more advanced level, the literature, cultures, history, and language studied during their time at Calvin and to explore ways in which their education has prepared them to engage with contemporary international culture. Students examine and critically reflect on the ethical, religious, and vocational implications of what they have learned. Prerequisites: DCM, Philosophical Foundations, Biblical or Theological Foundations I, SPAN 308 and SPAN 309, and at least junior standing.

Spanish: Spanish for the Professions

  
  •  

    SPAN 320 - Business Spanish

    (3)
    IN. An introduction to the terminology and standard forms of oral and written communication in Spanish relating to the fields of business and economics. This course also considers the cultural and economic context of business practices in the Hispanic world. Prerequisite: SPAN 301. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    SPAN 383 - External Practicum

    (1)


    FA, IN, SP, SU. Students work at least 60 hours in a position that must be related to their major. May be repeated multiple times for credit. No more than 12 credit hours of internship and/or practicum can be counted toward graduation requirements. International students enrolled in this course may apply for CPT authorization. Online.  

    Prerequisites: Not open to first-year students. Must be a major in the Spanish department and have received approval from the department. Applications are initiated through the Career Center. Students find their own position, which must be approved by the Career Center and the Spanish department. 


Spanish: Education Courses

  
  •  

    IDIS 301 - Introduction to Bilingual and ESL Education

    (3)
    FA. This course focuses on methods, pedagogies, and strategies for bilingual and ESL education, including linguistic, cognitive, affective, and social factors that influence the acquisition of a second language. Additional topics include policies, program models, culture, teaching in content areas, curricular design, and special populations. Students will identify ways in which Christian faith relates to understanding the role and value of languages and multilingualism and the impact of that understanding in an educational setting. Field experience required.
  
  •  

    IDIS 311 - Assessment for ESL and Bilingual Education

    (3)
    This course focuses on the design, implementation and analysis of assessment measures for English Learners and students in bilingual education. Students will understand various types of assessments and how features of assessment measures and evaluative tools used for English Learners can foster justice or injustice. In addition, the course will address questions about assessing language difficulties versus learning disabilities. Required for ESL and Bilingual Spanish minors. Prerequisite: IDIS 301  or approval of instructor.
  
  •  

    IDIS 356 - Introduction to Elementary World-Languages Pedagogy

    (3)
    FA. Theory and practice of teaching world languages in the elementary school. Study of methodologies, curricula, and programs. Off-campus field experience and observations required. Should be taken in the junior or senior year, prior to the student teacher internship. Required for Elementary or K-12 certification in world languages including ESL minors. Prerequisite:EDUC 302 -EDUC 303 .
  
  •  

    IDIS 357 - Introduction to Secondary World-Languages Pedagogy

    (3)
    FA. An introduction to the major principles and practices of teaching world languages, offering a study of various methodologies and the major controversies associated with them. The course explores how a Christian approach to education affects second-language pedagogy and how this pedagogy interacts with the language learner’s personal growth. It also introduces the prospective educator to the teaching of the basic skills, to issues in evaluation and assessment, and to the use of technologies in the language classroom. This course should be taken in the junior or senior year, prior to the student teacher internship. Required for secondary or K-12 certification in world languages including the ESL secondary minor. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent registration in EDUC 302 -EDUC 303 .
  
  •  

    IDIS 358 - Practicum for Bilingual or ESL Education

    (2)
    A field experience in ESL or bilingual education at the elementary, middle, secondary or adult level depending on the candidate’s program. This course is required in the ESL and Bilingual Spanish minors. In addition to the field experience, interns will meet weekly on campus with the university supervisor to discuss approaches and challenges encountered in the field experience placement. Prerequisites: IDIS 301 , IDIS 311  (or concurrent enrollment), and IDIS 357  or IDIS 357 .
  
  •  

    IDIS 359 - Seminar in Secondary World-Languages Pedagogy

    (3)
    SP. A seminar reinforcing the major principles and practices of world-languages pedagogy on the secondary level for students during their student teacher internship (EDUC 346 ). This course provides opportunities for collaborative work on putting theoretical and pedagogical matters of immediate concern into a practical framework. Prerequisites: EDUC 302 -EDUC 303  and successful completion of departmental proficiency exams.
  
  •  

    SPAN 358 - Aiding in the Spanish Language Classroom

    (3)
    IN. Students plan and facilitate small group sessions for SPAN 122. Morning activities include meeting with other aides and the professor, observing master teachers, and aiding master teachers in teaching. Afternoon activities include leading sessions with SPAN 122 students and planning lessons, materials, and activities under the supervision of the professor. Students will be evaluated based on their competency in the Spanish language, professional evaluations of teaching sessions and lesson plans/materials, participation in class discussions, daily journals, and an oral presentation. Prerequisite: SPAN 302 with a grade of B+ or better and permission of the instructor. Not offered 2020-2021.

Spanish Studies in Honduras

  
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    SPHO 205 - Poverty and Development

    (3)
    Analysis of development theories and major issues such as population, the environment, and globalization, as well as the role Christian values play in shaping responses to them. Includes several field trips. Fulfills Global and Historical Studies core. Not offered 2020-2021.
  
  •  

    SPHO 302 - Advanced Grammar, Conversation, and Composition II

    (3)
    FA, SP. A continuation of SPAN 301.
  
  •  

    SPHO 308 - Introduction to the Hispanic World I

    (4)
    SP. This course introduces students to major developments of the Hispanic World from antiquity through the Enlightenment. Discussions center on the relationship of major literary and artistic works to economic, political, religious, and social developments in the Iberian Peninsula and the Castilian colonies in the Americas. This course, normally the first in a sequence of two, prepares students for advanced-topics courses. An oral presentation and a research paper are required. Prerequisite: SPAN 301. (Global and Historical Studies core)
  
  •  

    SPHO 309 - Introduction to the Hispanic World II

    (4)
    SP. This course introduces students to major developments of the Hispanic World from the independence of the Spanish American colonies to the present day. Discussions center on the relationship of major literary and artistic works to economic, political, religious, and social developments in Spain and Spanish America. In addition, students develop their skills in reading and evaluating literature in a second language through representative texts, and they sharpen their skills in critical writing and analysis. This course, normally the second course in a sequence of two, prepares students for advanced-level culture and literature courses. Oral presentations and research paper are required. Prerequisite: SPAN 308, or permission of the instructor. (Literature core)
  
  •  

    SPHO 315 - Engaging Honduran Culture

    (3)
    FA. A weekly seminar in which students compare and reflect on what they have learned from readings, interviews, and daily experiences. Includes speakers and excursions. This course is taught in Spanish by the Calvin director and is required of all students. This course satisfies Cross-Cultural Engagement (CCE) core.
  
  •  

    SPHO 340 - Spanish Phonology and Dialectology

    (3)
    SP. An introduction to Spanish linguistics, concentrating on the sounds of Spanish (phonetics and phonology), with appropriate pronunciation practice and contrasts with English pronunciation. Included are units on the history of the Spanish language and the major dialects spoken today. Prerequisite: SPAN 301.
  
  •  

    SPHO 393 - Independent Ethnographic Study

    (2)
    SP. See the Spanish Department for more information.

Speech Pathology and Audiology

  
  •  

    SPAUD 101 - Introduction to Speech Pathology and Audiology

    (3)
    FA, SP, SU. A general introduction to speech-language pathology and audiology. These rapidly growing interdisciplinary professions are devoted to helping individuals manage or overcome communication challenges. Communication is a God-given gift that allows us to be social beings. When people have difficulty communicating, it affects almost all aspects of their lives. Students will gain a general understanding of prevention, evaluation, and rehabilitation issues for persons with speech, language, and hearing disorders in clinical and educational settings.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 210 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech, Hearing, and Language Mechanisms

    (4)
    FA, SP. A study of the anatomic and physiologic bases for the development and use of speech, language, and hearing. The course focuses on the central and peripheral auditory mechanisms of the human body, and on the respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory mechanisms required for speech production. The course includes a laboratory section.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 216 - Phonetics

    (4)
    FA. A study of phonetic theories and the use of International Phonetic Alphabet symbols in analyzing, categorizing, and transcribing the sounds of the world’s languages, focusing on American English. The course emphasizes understanding the processes involved in the production of specific phonemes. The laboratory section of the course focuses on developing students’ skills in broad and narrow transcription.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 217 - Speech Science

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introduction to speech physiology and the instrumentation used to measure physiologic aspects of speech. Topics include a basic understanding of the acoustic theories of speech production, experience in acoustic instrumentation, recording, and analysis equipment and procedures, an overview speech perception, and clinical applications of the speech science theories, instrumentation, and procedures.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 218 - Hearing Science

    (3)
    FA, SP. An introduction to hearing and hearing science. Topics include the physics of sound, the anatomy and physiology of the human auditory system, and the psychophysics of human hearing.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 311 - Child Language Development

    (3)
    FA, SP. An examination of early language development research in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Theories of language acquisition and implications for practice are examined. Particular attention is given to the role of adults in language development and to the relationship between language development and cognitive development.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 343 - Principles of Communication Neuroscience

    (3)
    IN. This course provides a thorough understanding of nervous system anatomy and physiology as it relates to speech, language, and hearing. Principles of molecular biology, systems theory, neuromuscular control, somatosensory processing and complex cognitive function are included. Select communication disorders are discussed to highlight the effects of breakdowns in nervous system function during speech, language, and hearing processes.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 344 - Audiology

    (3)
    FA. The study of the classification of hearing disorders and the behavioral and electrophysiological measurement of hearing, including subjective and objective testing procedures. Prerequisites: SPAUD 210
  
  •  

    SPAUD 345 - Aural Rehabilitation

    (3)
    SP. The study of the fundamental aspects of auditory rehabilitation, including individual and group amplification systems, auditory training, speech reading, and counseling with children and adults. Prerequisites: SPAUD 210
  
  •  

    SPAUD 370 - Introduction to Clinical Practicum: Observation

    (3)
    FA. This course provides a supervised clinical experience in which the student clinician observes individuals who have various speech, language, or hearing impairments under the supervision of a speech-language pathologist or audiologist. This course is required as the initial field experience for speech pathology and audiology majors and is designed to introduce students to general therapy and assessment procedures across the disciplines. Prerequisites: SPAUD 101, SPAUD 210, SPAUD 216, SPAUD 217, and SPAUD 218.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 384 - Speech Sound Disorders across the Lifespan

    (3)
    FA. Students learn about the nature, assessment and treatment of speech sound disorders in children and adults. Students review the developmental, anatomical and physiological aspects of speech sound production, learn the causes of speech sound disorders, and differentiate the characteristics of developmental, sensory, motor and neurological speech sound disorders. Prerequisites: SPAUD 210, SPAUD 216, SPAUD 217, SPAUD 218. It is a highly recommended course for the SPAUD BA-MA program and a required course for SPAUD BA program.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 385 - Language Disorders across the Lifespan

    (3)
    SP. This course on language disorders focuses on a basic understanding of pediatric and adult language differences, delays and disorders related to language-learning disabilities, attention-deficit disorders, aphasias, dementia, and traumatic brain injury. It is a highly recommended course for the SPAUD BA-MA program and a required course for SPAUD BA program. Prerequisites: SPAUD 210, SPAUD 216, SPAUD 217, SPAUD 218. Course is required for SPAUD BA program and highly recommended for the SPAUD BA-MA program.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 503 - Language Disorders I: Infants, Toddlers and Preschool Children

    (3)
    FA. A study of the nature, assessment and treatment of language disorders in infants, toddlers, and preschool children. Students learn language assessment practices and treatment strategies that are developmentally appropriate for young children that concentrate on improving communication between young children and their communication partners. Strategies for working with families with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are addressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: acceptance into the SPAUD MA program.
  
  •  

    SPAUD 504 - Language Disorders II: School-Age

    (3)
    SP. A study of the nature, assessment and treatment of language disorders in elementary, middle, and high school students. Students learn language assessment practices and treatment strategies for the school-aged population. Strength-based assessments and evidence-based practice models will be highlighted in the course along with models for collaborating with teachers and other school-based professionals. Prerequisite: acceptance into the SPAUD MA program.
 

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