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Calvin College    
 
    
 
  Oct 20, 2017
 
2017-2018 Catalog

Courses


Description of courses offered by the various departments

The symbols FA (fall), I (interim), SP (spring), and SU (summer) indicate when each course is offered. The credit (semester hours) for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course name. Interim course descriptions are made available during the fall semester and are published online.

 

 

Philosophy: Advanced Historical Courses

All advanced courses presuppose two or more philosophy courses, or one philosophy course plus junior or senior standing.

   •  PHIL 312 - Plato and Aristotle
   •  PHIL 322 - Aquinas
   •  PHIL 331 - Kant
   •  PHIL 333 - Kierkegaard
   •  PHIL 334 - Marx and Marxism
   •  PHIL 336 - Studies in Modern Philosophy
   •  PHIL 340 - Contemporary Continental Philosophy
   •  PHIL 341 - Contemporary Anglo-American Philosophy

Philosophy: Advanced Systematic Courses

   •  PHIL 318 - Minds, Brains, and Persons
   •  PHIL 365 - Ethical Theory
   •  PHIL 371 - Epistemology
   •  PHIL 375 - Philosophical Anthropology
   •  PHIL 378 - Philosophy of Language and Interpretation
   •  PHIL 390 - A Readings and Research
   •  PHIL 395 - Philosophy Topics: Problems in Systematic Philosophy
   •  PHIL 396 - Philosophy Topics: Figures and Themes in the History of Philosophy

Physical Education and Recreation: Personal Fitness

A course in this area is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and activity requirements to maintain active lives. This course is to be used as a gateway course before students complete their two additional requirements, one from leisure and lifetime activities and one from sport, dance and society core categories. (Students take one course from the personal fitness series then one course each from the leisure and lifetime series and from the sport, dance and society series.) The emphasis in each course is on fitness development and maintenance. Students are expected to train 3 times per week—2 times in class and 1 time outside of class. All courses involve the participation in conditioning activities, lectures, discussions, papers, and tests. Elementary education students take Physical Education 222 for their personal fitness course. Conceptual topics related to wellness included in all personal fitness courses are these: (1) principles for the development of an active lifestyle, (2) issues in nutrition, and (3) body image.

   •  PER 101 - Jogging and Road Racing
   •  PER 102 - Nordic Walking
   •  PER 103 - Road Cycling
   •  PER 104 - Core Strength Training and Balance
   •  PER 105 - Aerobic Dance
   •  PER 106 - Cardio Cross Training
   •  PER 107 - Strength and Conditioning
   •  PER 108 - Aquatic Fitness
   •  PER 110 - Water Aerobics
   •  PER 112 - Special Topics in Personal Fitness

Physical Education and Recreation: Leisure and Lifetime Activities

A course in this area is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge to acquire and develop selected motor skills for a lifetime of leisure. Each course emphasizes the following: 1) personal development in a specific activity, and 2) acquisition of basic skills needed for a lifetime of healthy leisure activity. Lectures, readings, and activity (golf I, bowling, sacred dance, etc.) are used to educate the student on the values of skill instruction, practice, and participation in a lifetime activity. Students are provided with a general introduction to current issues such as these: skill building, Christian stewardship, and stress management.

   •  PER 120 - Scuba
   •  PER 124 - Swim I
   •  PER 125 - Swim II
   •  PER 126 - Cross Country Skiing
   •  PER 127 - Downhill Skiing
   •  PER 128 - Ice Skating
   •  PER 129 - Karate
   •  PER 130 - Women's Self Defense
   •  PER 132 - Golf Level I
   •  PER 133 - Golf Level II
   •  PER 137 - Bowling
   •  PER 138 - Wilderness Pursuits
   •  PER 141 - Rock Climbing I
   •  PER 142 - Rock Climbing II
   •  PER 143 - Canoeing
   •  PER 144 - Frisbee
   •  PER 145 - Fly Fishing
   •  PER 150 - Educational Dance
   •  PER 151 - Tap Dance I
   •  PER 152 - Jazz Dance I
   •  PER 153 - Modern Dance I
   •  PER 154 - Sacred Dance
   •  PER 155 - Ballet Dance I
   •  PER 156 - Creative Dance
   •  PER 157 - Rhythm in Dance
   •  PER 158 - Social Dance
   •  PER 159 - Square and Folk Dance

Physical Education and Recreation: Sport, Dance and Society

Sport, Dance and Society (1). F, S. A course in this area is designed to help students develop a faith-informed perspective, understanding of and appreciation for the impact of highly-skilled human movement through play, and sport, with a particular focus on the enhancement of selected motor skills. Lectures, readings, and group activity are used to educate the student on the values of skill instruction, practice, and participation in a lifetime activity.

   •  PER 161 - Tap Dance II
   •  PER 162 - Jazz Dance II
   •  PER 163 - Modern Dance II
   •  PER 165 - Ballet Dance II
   •  PER 167 - Period Styles of Dance
   •  PER 168 - Visual Design in Dance
   •  PER 171 - Racquetball
   •  PER 172 - Water Polo
   •  PER 173 - Basketball
   •  PER 174 - Volleyball Level I
   •  PER 175 - Volleyball Level II
   •  PER 176 - Cooperative World Games
   •  PER 177 - Slow Pitch Softball
   •  PER 180 - Badminton Level I
   •  PER 181 - Badminton Level II
   •  PER 182 - Tennis Level I
   •  PER 183 - Tennis Level II
   •  PER 185 - Soccer

Physics: Advanced Laboratory Courses

   •  PHYS 339 - Advanced Classical Mechanics Laboratory
   •  PHYS 349 - Advanced Electromagnetism and Optics Laboratory
   •  PHYS 379 - Advanced Quantum Physics Laboratory
   •  PHYS 395 - Physics Research, Writing, and Presentation

Physics: Advanced Theory Courses

   •  PHYS 306 - Introduction to Quantum Physics
   •  PHYS 335 - Classical Mechanics
   •  PHYS 345 - Electromagnetism
   •  PHYS 346 - Advanced Optics
   •  PHYS 347 - Relativistic Electrodynamics
   •  PHYS 365 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics
   •  PHYS 375 - Quantum Mechanics
   •  PHYS 376 - Quantum Mechanics
   •  PHYS 390 - Independent Study in Physics

Physics: Introductory Courses

   •  PHYS 132 - Matter, Light, and Energy
   •  PHYS 133 - Introductory Physics: Mechanics and Gravity
   •  PHYS 195 - Physics and Astronomy Student Seminar
   •  PHYS 212 - Inquiry-Based Physics
   •  PHYS 221 - General Physics
   •  PHYS 222 - General Physics
   •  PHYS 223 - Physics for the Health Sciences
   •  PHYS 235 - Introductory Physics: Electricity and Magnetism
   •  PHYS 237 - Einstein's Theory of Relativity
   •  PHYS 246 - Waves, Optics, and Optical Technology
   •  PHYS 295 - Seminar in Physics, Technology and Society
   •  PHYS 296 - Studies in Physics, Technology and Society

Political Science

See the Political Science Department for a description of courses and programs of concentration in international relations.

   •  POLS 101 - Ideas and Institutions in American Politics
   •  POLS 110 - Persons in Political Community
   •  POLS 202 - Democracy in America: State and Federal Government
   •  POLS 207 - International Cooperation and Conflict
 

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